Home
Search results “Written text analysis essay”
How To Write An Analytical Essay: What Is It?
 
05:24
This video, part of a series on analytical essay writing, takes you through exactly what it means to analyse a text in an English essay. What does an analytical essay look like? What is it about? What kinds of questions will I be asked in an exam? View the video for more...
Views: 55072 Aimee Shattock
How to write a Text Response | Essay structure | Lisa Tran
 
10:22
A long awaited video! Here's how to write a Text Response essay, breaking down introduction, body paragraphs (TEEL), and conclusions - including examples for the text, Macbeth! // related content The Ultimate Guide To VCE Text Response: http://bit.ly/2DZhAyU Text Response Recipe for SUCCESS: http://bit.ly/2j84sNF ‘Must-Know’ Text Response Tips: http://bit.ly/2j8an5k Year 12: How to turn Text Response essays from Average to A+: http://bit.ly/2qVQRtR Introduction to Text Response (Reading and Creating): http://bit.ly/2CG01Vi “Studying English?” Priming for Battle - http://bit.ly/2CCRsdY // what I'm reading Shoe Dog by Phil Knight (the Nike story): http://bit.ly/2ANYFWo // R E S O U R C E S 💌 Join the #lisasstudyguides mailing list http://bit.ly/lsgmailing 💫 Private Tutoring for VCE students | Want me or other 40+ study score achievers to be your tutor? | http://bit.ly/lsgtutoring 💣How to Write a Killer Essay ebook | $9.95 http://bit.ly/killeressay 📚 Ultimate VCE English Study Guide ebook | $49 http://bit.ly/ultimateenglishpack 🎥 How to achieve A+ in Language Analysis online course | Watch sample videos | http://bit.ly/lsgcourse // F O L L O W ▸ blog | http://bit.ly/lsgblogs ▸ facebook | http://bit.ly/2PXDZB3 // R E C O M M E N D M E If you'd like to give back to me, all I ask is for a kind review. This is the best way for you to say thanks! By leaving a review, you share positive word of mouth about what I do, and encourage others to place trust in my business, Lisa's Study Guides :) ⭐Facebook: bit.ly/2BW9024 ⭐Google: bit.ly/2BYRGtg // C O N T A C T M E 💌 [email protected] (NOTE: I do not offer personalised homework help out of respect for my private students. If you are looking for study support, ask here and sign up to my mailing list!) 📮 Lisa's Study Guides PO BOX 2036 Forest Hill 3131 VIC // A B O U T Hi! I'm Lisa and I make English interesting, relevant, and do I dare say - FUN! English is a subject we all have to study at some point, why not turn it into something much more than just a chore? Follow me and learn how to be successful in high school English while actually enjoying yourself! Subscribe to Lisa's Study Guides to get inspired by new videos weekly! http://bit.ly/lsgmailing // C R E D I T S Sarah Wong (Animator): behance.net/sarahwongma8e2 Alex Tran (Video editor)
Views: 6443 Lisa's Study Guides
How to Write a Critical Analysis Essay
 
08:58
Learning how to write a critical analysis essay is an important skill for college students. You'll need to learn how to critique what you read and how to write it as an essay. In this video, I explain how to use rhetorical strategies to write a critical analysis essay for a college English class. If you are confused or have questions, please let me know in the comments and I'll be glad to answer them. Thanks for watching and good luck writing! This is Episode 10 in the series for my ENG101 Class for Eastern Arizona College.
Views: 49582 Read, Write, and Cite
How to Analyze a Text
 
13:03
This video addresses Utah's Writing Standard 9 for Language Arts in Grades 11-12. It focuses on some of the ways in which a text can be analyzed and provides the basic vocabulary of an analysis. This video was intended for educational purposes and should only be used as supplemental material, not a holistic lesson on textual analysis.
Views: 14398 Braxton Thornley
Analyse with me | Analysing Argument #1 | Lisa Tran
 
15:46
My first Analysing Argument tutorial with you! Just like my tutoring sessions, I've analysed an article with you - focusing today on identifying techniques, explaining what these techniques mean, and how they have an effect on the reader. If you're interested in my online course: 🎥 How to achieve A+ in Language Analysis online course | Watch sample videos | http://bit.ly/languageanalysis (link includes a 15% off coupon) Link to Truancy article (scroll to the bottom of the paper): http://bit.ly/2DM75jK Link to Truancy annotations: http://bit.ly/2AtusMl // related content (all updated for Analysing Argument) The Ultimate Guide To VCE Language Analysis: http://bit.ly/2WCBbfS Why your Language Analysis doesn’t score as well as it should: http://bit.ly/2DIDgjY Quick Tips to Ace Language Analysis: http://bit.ly/2DIDgjY How to structure a Language Analysis for two or more texts: http://bit.ly/2tmZosm 195 Language Analysis Tones: http://bit.ly/2ptjX3W // R E S O U R C E S 💌 Join the #lisasstudyguides mailing list | http://bit.ly/maillisasstudyguides 📚 Ultimate VCE English Study Guide | Written by me! | http://bit.ly/ultimateenglishpack 💫 Private Tutoring for VCE students | Want me to be your tutor? | http://bit.ly/privatevcetutoring 🎥 How to achieve A+ in Language Analysis online course | Watch sample videos | http://bit.ly/languageanalysis // F O L L O W ▸ blog | http://bit.ly/bloglisasstudyguides ▸ instagram | http://instagram.com/lisasstudyguides ▸ facebook | http://facebook.com/vcestudyguides // C O N T A C T M E 💌 [email protected] 📮 Lisa's Study Guides PO BOX 2036 Forest Hill 3131 VIC // A B O U T Hi! I'm Lisa and I make English interesting, relevant, and do I dare say - FUN! English is a subject we all have to study at some point, why not turn it into something much more than just a chore? Follow me and learn how to be successful in high school English while actually enjoying yourself! Subscribe to Lisa's Study Guides to get inspired by new videos weekly! http://bit.ly/sublisasstudyguides // C R E D I T S Alex Tran (video editor)
Views: 27186 Lisa's Study Guides
Writing a Literary Analysis Essay
 
10:05
After you've read the text and collected information that you deem potentially helpful to your prompt, remember to organize that information. Take a look here to gather some pertinent ideas on how to do that!
Views: 93795 WarnerJordanEducation
Martin Luther King: I Have A Dream: Textual Analysis (Part 1)
 
28:20
This video examines the text of the first half of the speech, with particular emphasis on rhetorical strategies and conceptual vocabulary in context. Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwkLmucRMkE&feature=youtu.be
Views: 27262 Thomas Lewandowski
√ How to Analyse Texts Critically - Critical Thinking - English
 
21:11
#iitutor #English #CriticalThinking https://www.iitutor.com/ https://blog.gradeproof.com/need-more-inspiration-on-how-to-improve-your-writing/ Every Text Can Be Interpreted Every idea, theme and concept in a text is open for interpretation and its meaning can change. Don’t assume common knowledge, because even facts need to be proven. So, for that reason, you can choose to ignore more common analysis and come up with your own. Critical Analysis of Texts Texts can be analysed independently. There is no set consensus on how you should do it – only that you are able to justify the how and why in your argument. It requires breaking down a text and its key sections, a bit of note-taking, and for you to make clear distinctions. Construction of Story There is much to analyse in how a story is constructed. The way language and structure are used is important. It influences the meaning of the text. Think about how the form and style of an author affects how the text communicates. You should be looking for things such as: • medium • genre • style of prose/poetry • use of plot devices such as flashbacks, varied narrators and climax • formatting/editing • meaning • representation Language Visual and written language techniques are the simplest method you may use to interpret a text. You must think and analyse how and why they are used. You must constantly challenge the use of such techniques. look at how they contribute to meaning: • imagery, emotional and sensory language • metaphor • visual layout • camera and film techniques • dialogue • contrast, paradox and juxtaposition Characterisation Characterisation is an important consideration for critical analysis. By analysing how a character is portrayed, you can discuss their motives and purpose. This is not the same as describing a character. Characterisation can be indicated through description and dialogue, or through the ‘voice’ of the narrator. This is indicated through: • use of dialogue • description • character’s role (antagonist, protagonist, foil) • relationships • change in narration • language techniques and their effect on appearance Theme Theme is purely interpretive. Any theme you identify has to be justified and argued. Theme can be interpreted through a key idea or effect of a text. In other words, the theme is basically the predominant idea of what the text achieves through meaning. They can be ideas relating to: • philosophy/psychology • feelings • personal issues • political • social • cultural • religious/spiritual • life and its stages
Views: 46867 iitutor.com
Structuring a Text Response Essay
 
10:28
A video quickly explaining the basics of a text response essay. Taught in the context of VCE Unit 1 English: Reading and Creating #excitement #English #textresponse #readingandcreating #kittens #puppies
Views: 9341 Steven Lo
How to Write a Strong Introduction for an Analytical Essay
 
06:48
The steps involved in an introductory paragraph for an analytical essay on a novel.
Views: 44043 Meg Mosier
Literary text essay writing
 
14:54
How to write a level one written text essay using Job , a short story by New Zealand author Dan Preston.
Views: 401 Gavin Fitzhenry
How to Analyze Scholarly Articles
 
03:50
This is the CSU-Pueblo University Library Quick Class on How to Analyze Scholarly Articles. For more information, visit: http://library.csupueblo.edu
How to Write a Reader Response Essay
 
10:48
The reader response essay is the most common form of a literary analysis essay. It asks the writer to put into words their response to what they've read. In this video, I explain how to write a reader response essay for a college English class. Still have questions? Please let me know in the comments and I'll be glad to answer your questions! This is Episode 6 in the series for my ENG101 Class for Eastern Arizona College.
Views: 10417 Read, Write, and Cite
5 Rules for Answering ESSAY Questions on Exams
 
09:35
Start building your analytical skills on Brilliant for free at https://brilliant.org/ThomasFrank - and be among the first 83 people to sign up to get 20% off your subscription. Huge thanks to Brilliant for sponsoring this video! Out of all the types of test questions, essay questions inspire the most fear and dread - after all, there's no guessing your way out of them. Using the 5 rules we'll cover in this video, though, you'll be able to ace the next essay question that crosses you path. Get my book "10 Steps to Earning Awesome Grades" FREE: https://collegeinfogeek.com/get-better-grades/ Follow Me: Instagram ➔ https://instagram.com/tomfrankly Twitter ➔ https://twitter.com/tomfrankly Podcast ➔ https://www.youtube.com/TheCollegeInfoGeekPodcast Subscribe to My Channel: http://buff.ly/1vQP5ar My Video Gear: https://kit.com/tomfrankly/my-video-gear
Views: 139523 Thomas Frank
Writing Center: Rhetorical Analysis
 
15:29
http://UofLIFE.com/writing This University of Life video explains what a rhetorical analysis paper is all about and how to write a great one, along with pointing out the most common pitfalls to avoid.
Views: 192483 Shaun Roundy
How to Write Up a Discourse Analysis
 
30:16
This video explains features of a discourse analysis article that are helpful for students in learning to write about their own studies. To view the video on writing qualitative findings paragraphs mentioned in this video, go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmKuvwk8x84
Persuasive text analysis
 
28:48
A quick run through of a sample persuasive language response
Views: 115 Mister Kelly
English Language Arts (ELA) Regents - How to Succeed on Part 3 Text Analysis Response!
 
01:22
3 crucial things to remember to address in your text analysis response!! Hit all 3 points to get that 4/4 on the rubric!
Views: 23672 learningwithmslee
Text Dependent Analysis Lesson
 
15:02
Recorded with http://screencast-o-matic.com
Views: 10422 Sarah Dilling
Sample MLA Literary Analysis Paper
 
05:07
a few key points on wrting an analysis paper
Views: 5666 Andrew Neuendorf
Medea | Essay Topic Breakdown | Lisa Tran
 
07:41
SO MANY EXTRA TEXT RESPONSE RESOURCES LINKED BELOW ↓ ↓ ↓ The most popular VCE text for years has been Medea, by Euripedes. I explore the prompt: “The play ‘Medea’ shows the injustices of a patriarchal society,” looking at keywords and brainstorming main ideas. The takeaway message for this video is that it is OK to agree with the prompt in all your body paragraphs (so long as you back your ideas); you don't have to disagree just for the sake of disagreeing :) // related content Text Response Recipe for SUCCESS: http://bit.ly/2j84sNF ‘Must-Know’ Text Response Tips: http://bit.ly/2j8an5k Year 12: How to turn Text Response essays from Average to A+: http://bit.ly/2qVQRtR Introduction to Text Response (Reading and Creating): http://bit.ly/2CG01Vi “Studying English?” Priming for Battle - http://bit.ly/2CCRsdY // recommended reading Medea: http://bit.ly/2CEWB52 Ultimate VCE English Study Guide: http://bit.ly/ultimateenglishpack // R E S O U R C E S 💌 Join the #lisasstudyguides mailing list | http://bit.ly/maillisasstudyguides 📚 Ultimate VCE English Study Guide | Written by me! | http://bit.ly/ultimateenglishpack 💫 Private Tutoring for VCE students | Want me to be your tutor? | http://bit.ly/privatevcetutoring 🎥 How to achieve A+ in Language Analysis online course | Watch sample videos | http://bit.ly/languageanalysis // F O L L O W ▸ blog | http://bit.ly/bloglisasstudyguides ▸ instagram | http://instagram.com/lisasstudyguides ▸ facebook | http://facebook.com/vcestudyguides // C O N T A C T M E 💌 [email protected] 📮 Lisa's Study Guides PO BOX 2036 Forest Hill 3131 VIC // A B O U T Hi! I'm Lisa and I make English interesting, relevant, and do I dare say - FUN! English is a subject we all have to study at some point, why not turn it into something much more than just a chore? Follow me and learn how to be successful in high school English while actually enjoying yourself! Subscribe to Lisa's Study Guides to get inspired by new videos weekly! http://bit.ly/sublisasstudyguides // C R E D I T S Ashley Karetnik (Lisa's Study Guides' tutor and Medea essay writer) Sarah Wong (Animator): behance.net/sarahwongma8e2
Views: 14985 Lisa's Study Guides
Analyzing the argument - Part 1 of 2
 
05:32
Analyzing the argument is an important skill in everyday life, but it is particularly important in academic reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Learn the basics of how arguments are built so you can analyze them more easily. [CC] English subtitles. [CC] Subtítulos en español. [CC] Legendado em português. ______________________________ GUIDE "Critical Reading" (THIS PLAYLIST): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJhf0iVdOF5YQG0V9wlX9bhD Critical thinking and reading (introduction): https://youtu.be/iOGvwPmKOqQ Distinguishing fact from opinion: https://youtu.be/Gs9ZGW_1oMM Analyzing the argument (1/3)... https://youtu.be/pP8dWURrEF0 ______________________________ RELATED VIDEOS "Vocabulary" playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJjhlBnZZkd0EuC5Wv3zYUJs "About Literacy" playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJhsfgoIfpQ3mGAXiXh1Cxsm "Interpreting what we read" playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJgPenynBNKRS-_RDBK1CIyv ______________________________ FURTHER READING ABOUT THE ARGUMENT Introduction to Logic (by Beth Rosdatter, University of Kentucky): http://www.uky.edu/~rosdatte/phi120/cntablea.htm Introduction to Logic (by Kevin Klement, University of Massachussets-Amhearst): http://people.umass.edu/klement/100/logic.html Argument (in Help with Logic Coach; web site): http://academic.csuohio.edu/polen/LC9_Help/1/ ______________________________ FURTHER READING Summary of research on cell phones and cancer risk (cancer.gov article): http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/radiation/cell-phones-fact-sheet Review of evidence for the association between mobile phone use and risk of intracranial tumors (peer-reviewed article in the Journal of Negative Results in BioMedicine): http://jnrbm.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12952-015-0043-7 Use of mobile phones and risk of brain tumours: update of Danish cohort study (British Medical Journal article in PDF): http://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/343/bmj.d6387.full.pdf ______________________________ REFERENCES ProCon.org. (2016, January). Cell Phones ProCon.org Retrieved from http://cellphones.procon.org/ Lennart Hardell et al., "Meta-Analysis of Long-Term Mobile Phone Use and the Association With Brain Tumours," International Journal of Oncology, Mar. 2008 ______________________________ MUSIC "And Then We Take Them Down Again" by Dokashiteru (feat. Susan Joseph) "Sooner or Later" in Artificial Music by Aryll Fae
Views: 48921 Snap Language
How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay: Logical Structure
 
09:51
https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays This is a sample video from a full video tutorial course that teaches you how to improve your academic essay writing. The course is hosted on Udemy. To learn more, preview a selection of videos, and get a HUGE DISCOUNT on the signup price, click the link below: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays Many students enter college without the skills necessary to succeed simply because they were never properly taught how to write essays. This course aims to overcome this problem by offering a systemic framework for essay writing that removes the mystery and presents a clear path for moving from idea to outline to completed first draft. TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION A Brief Introduction to the Course SECTION 2: WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS SO IMPORTANT? Good Writers Rule the World SECTION 3: WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure SECTION 4: HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing for Discovery versus Writing for Presentation Why Rewriting is Important (And Why Students Don’t Think So) How to Deal with Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block SECTION 5: WHAT IS MY IDEAL WRITING WORKFLOW? The Right Way to Think About Outlining My Ideal Writing Workflow Tools for Mind-Mapping, Outlining and Drafting The Writing Tools I Use: A Quick Introduction to Scrivener SECTION 6: WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using Scrivener A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template SECTION 7: FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part1: The Assignment Part 2: Initial Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References and Citations SECTION 8: HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The Number One Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing SECTION 9: HOW TO WRITE A GOOD ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY The Minimal Five-Part Structure of a Good Argumentative Essay Writing the Introduction Writing the Conclusion The Essay: “Should Teachers Be Allowed to Ban Laptops in Classrooms? Analysis: The Introduction Analysis: First Argument Analysis: Second Argument Analysis: Third Argument Analysis of the Main Body: Evaluation and Recommendations Analysis: Conclusion The Essay: An Improved Version SECTION 10: WHAT IS PLAGIARISM AND HOW CAN I AVOID IT? What is Plagiarism? Downloading and Buying Whole Papers Cutting and Pasting from Several Sources Changing Some Words But Copying Whole Phrases Paraphrasing Without Attribution The Debate Over Patchwriting SECTION 11: HOW SHOULD I CITE SOURCES IN MY ESSAY? When Should I Cite a Source? What Needs to be Cited? How to Cite: Mark the Boundaries Citing Exact Words Citing a Longer Quotation Citing a Source But Not Quoting Do I Have to Cite Information That is “Common Knowledge”? Citation Styles: MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian, oh my! SECTION 12: WRAPPING UP Thank You GET A HUGE DISCOUNT ON THIS COURSE: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/philosophyfreak?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 874767 Kevin deLaplante
How to Write an Argumentative Essay - Thesis Statements and Paragraphs
 
06:12
Introducing the British Council’s How to Write an Argumentative Essay animated video series. This is the second of five simple and easy to follow videos that will show you how you can improve your writing. We will look at: • Planning and question analysis • Writing a paragraph • Introduction and conclusion • Counter paragraph • Editing The British Council is committed to sharing our expertise in English language learning. This series is a comprehensive online tuition guide, taking you through all the key elements you need for a good piece of argumentative essay writing. This series is particularly relevant to secondary school students struggling with their English curriculum. For more information on our courses, check out our website http://www.britishcouncil.sg/english/courses-secondary or use our other free resources at learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org. Alternatively, to speak to one of our customer service advisors, please contact us at: Napier Road Centre +65 6653 6042 Marsiling Centre +65 6653 6044 Tampines Centre +65 6653 6063 Toa Payoh Centre +65 6653 6045 You can also follow us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/BritishCouncilSingapore), or Twitter (@sgBritish). Enjoy the videos!
Views: 174811 britishcouncilsg
Thesis Statements: Four Steps to a Great Essay | 60second Recap®
 
04:31
Thesis Statements: Four Steps to a Great Essay, using an example from "The Scarlet Letter" by Nathaniel Hawthorne | Excerpt from "How to Write an A+ Essay: A Step-by-Step Guide" by Jenny Sawyer. http://goo.gl/SpJhCS 0:01 Writing the thesis statement. Overview. 0:19 What you must do BEFORE you begin writing your thesis statement, 0:26 Sample assignment: from "The Scarlet Letter" by Nathaniel Hawthorne 0:37 Writing the thesis statement: Step One. Answer the question 1:08 Writing the thesis statement: Step Two. Refine your answer 2:10 Writing the thesis statement: Step Three. Choose the right supporting examples. 3:20 Writing the thesis statement: Step Four. Go Deeper! 3:40 Review of the sample assignment and the finalized thesis statement 4:07 Review of the four steps to a great thesis statement. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- "How to Write an A+ Essay: A Step-by-Step Guide to Acing Your Next Assignment" by Jenny Sawyer. At Amazon's Kindle Store... http://goo.gl/xobJFo WRITE AN A+ ESSAY: IT'S EASIER THAN YOU MIGHT THINK. I'm going to make a confession. I was a straight-A student in high school. I graduated summa cum laude from college. My senior thesis won the institution’s coveted essay-writing prize. Not thanks to raw brilliance, or dazzling talent. No, I knew how to write essays. You see, great essays aren’t necessarily written by the “best and brightest.” They're written by students who know the rules—from concept to thesis statement, from outline to final draft. Students who know how to get the best possible grade for the least amount of work. I’ll show you how you can, too. A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO CONQUERING YOUR NEXT ESSAY ASSIGNMENT My name is Jenny Sawyer. Over the past five years, I’ve been the girl behind 60second Recap®. I've invested thousands of hours helping teens understand classic literature. I’ve answered countless emails seeking help with essay assignments. I’ve guided individual students, one-on-one, through the process of crafting thesis statements and writing essays, testing and refining the techniques I used when I was in school. Strategies I employed to nail essay after essay. Most people think A+ essays require hours of hard work. Or genius. I’d always had a hunch they’d thought wrong. Now, I'm certain of it: YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE A GENIUS TO WRITE AN A+ ESSAY I’ve read mediocre essays from brilliant students. Great essays from ordinary students. What sets those A+ essay-writing students apart? They know how to analyze the assignment to keep themselves on track. I’ll show you how you can, too. YOU DON’T NEED LONG HOURS TO WRITE AN A+ ESSAY The best essays rarely take the most time. In fact, some nearly write themselves. How? With the right kind of preparation: A+ essay-writing students organize their research and cut their workload by as much as half. I’ll show you how you can, too. FORMULAS ARE NEVER THE ANSWER, BUT... A+ essays are never formulaic. But they have a lot in commont. A+ essays start strong with crisp, provocative thesis statements. A+ essays support those thesis statements with well-chosen examples and tightly-reasoned arguments—the hallmarks of persuasive writing. A+ essays finish strong, with conclusions that locked the reader into agreement with the essay’s thesis. A+ essays are written by students working from a simple framework: the five-paragraph essay format. I’ll show you how you can, too. DON’T BE INTIMIDATED: IT’S A HEAD GAME, YOU KNOW Ready to supercharge your essay-writing process? You can when you “think like a prosecutor.” I'll show you how. I’ll also reveal the courtroom “trick” you can use to save yourself time and trouble while you craft a great thesis statement. You'll see how you can use the strategies of a criminal trial to speed you through each step of the essay-writing process, from the organization of your research, to the writing of your thesis statement, to the polish of your final draft. It’s the first time I’ve ever set this strategy to paper. Now it’s all here for you, just a click away. YOUR A+ AWAITS. CLICK THIS LINK http://goo.gl/xobJFo AND GRAB YOUR COPY OF MY STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO ESSAY MASTERY
Views: 793784 60second Recap®
How To Analyse A Poem
 
05:09
Poetry Analysis Support: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/poetry-analysis-support-essay-writing-template-sentence-starters-annotation-prompts-12034083 How to analyse a poem – in six steps: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/how-to-analyse-a-poem-11494512 Analysing a poem can be tricky. Before you analyse a poem in detail, it is important to read through the poem several times. Try to read the poem aloud, because poems can often have a range of sound devices that can alter the poem's meaning. Once you've read through the poem, you can start analysing the poem's content. Here are six steps to help you to analyse a poem: Step 1: Subject. What is the poem about and why? Step 2: Theme. What are the recurring ideas and topics? Step 3: Tone. How would you describe the mood of the language? Step 4: Imagery. What literary devices are used and what do they signify? Step 5: Form. Why the poet has chosen this structure? Step 6: Feeling. What are the different emotions being conveyed? How do you analyse a poem? The prompts are a supportive tool, intended to encourage further analysis and interpretation. If you found this helpful, you may wish to check out Poetry Essay app. It provides you with a range of writing frames to help you stich a poetry essay together. Alternatively, please visit poetryessay.co.uk for some other free resources – such as posters, poetry annotations and planning templates – to assist your analysis of poetry. Poetry Essay app unfortunately is no longer supported, since iOS 11. For daily poetry news and essay support, please visit: http://www.poetryessay.co.uk
Views: 134106 Poetry Essay
Cohesion &  Coherence in Essay Writing
 
22:47
Cohesion is the glue that holds your sentences together. Coherence makes sure your ideas connect to create a clear “whole”. In this video, we will look at the elements that create strong cohesion and coherence that will make your writing stronger, better, and easier for the reader to follow, and for your IELTS or TOEFL grader to score high. Need ideas for your essays? Check out our ideas e-book: http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Find more writing tips at https://writetotop.com/ Want more great videos to help you pass the IELTS or TOEFL Writing Section? Support Write to the Top: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 113845 Write to Top
What is CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS? What does CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS mean?
 
04:21
✪✪✪✪✪ We're uploading our new videos at - https://bittubers.com/profile/TheAudiopedia . Check us out and SUBSCRIBE there. ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS? What does CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS mean? CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS meaning - CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS definition - CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Critical discourse analysis (CDA) is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of discourse that views language as a form of social practice. Scholars working in the tradition of CDA generally argue that (non-linguistic) social practice and linguistic practice constitute one another and focus on investigating how societal power relations are established and reinforced through language use. Critical discourse analysis emerged from 'critical linguistics' developed at the University of East Anglia in the 1970s, and the terms are now often interchangeable. Sociolinguistics was paying little attention to social hierarchy and power. CDA was first developed by the Lancaster school of linguists of which Norman Fairclough was the most prominent figure. Ruth Wodak has also made a major contribution to this field of study. In addition to linguistic theory, the approach draws from social theory—and contributions from Karl Marx, Antonio Gramsci, Louis Althusser, Jürgen Habermas, Michel Foucault and Pierre Bourdieu—in order to examine ideologies and power relations involved in discourse. Language connects with the social through being the primary domain of ideology, and through being both a site of, and a stake in, struggles for power. Ideology has been called the basis of the social representations of groups, and, in psychological versions of CDA developed by Teun A. van Dijk and Ruth Wodak, there is assumed to be a sociocognitive interface between social structures and discourse structures. The historical dimension in critical discourse studies also plays an important role. Although CDA is sometimes mistaken to represent a 'method' of discourse analysis, it is generally agreed upon that any explicit method in discourse studies, the humanities and social sciences may be used in CDA research, as long as it is able to adequately and relevantly produce insights into the way discourse reproduces (or resists) social and political inequality, power abuse or domination. That is, CDA does not limit its analysis to specific structures of text or talk, but systematically relates these to structures of the sociopolitical context. CDA has been used to examine political speech acts, to highlight the rhetoric behind these, and any forms of speech that may be used to manipulate the impression given to the audience. However, there have been flaws noted with CDA. For example, it has been said that it is simultaneously too broad to distinctly identify manipulations within the rhetoric, yet is also not powerful enough to appropriately find all that researchers set out to establish. Norman Fairclough developed a three-dimensional framework for studying discourse, where the aim is to map three separate forms of analysis onto one another: analysis of (spoken or written) language texts, analysis of discourse practice (processes of text production, distribution and consumption) and analysis of discursive events as instances of sociocultural practice. Particularly, he combines micro, meso and macro-level interpretation. At the micro-level, the analyst considers various aspects of textual/linguistic analysis, for examples syntactic analysis, use of metaphor and rhetorical devices. The meso-level or "level of discursive practice" involves studying issues of production and consumption, for instance, which institution produced a text, who is the target audience, etc. At the macro-level, the analyst is concerned with intertextual and interdiscursive elements and tries to take into account the broad, societal currents that are affecting the text being studied.
Views: 24084 The Audiopedia
How to Summarize & Critically Respond to an Article
 
05:39
This narrated presentation teaches students how to critically read a piece of writing. It focuses on helping students write the summary portion and the analytical response portion of their Essay. You can print a copy of my notes from this video here: http://www.mesacc.edu/~paoih30491/How%20To%20Summarize%20and%20Critically%20Analyze%20PDF.pdf Sources: Crusius and Channell, The Aims of Argument, Mayfield Publishing Co., 1995 The Prentice Hall Guide for College Writers, 8th Ed. by Stephen Ried, 2008. Published by Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ Global Issues, Local Arguments: Readings for Writings by June Johnson, 2007. Published by Longman , New York, NY.
Views: 170754 Paola Brown
Opinion Essay or Persuasive Essay
 
05:42
Watch Shaun's Smrt Live Class live for free on YouTube every Thursday at 17 00 GMT (17 00 GMT = https://goo.gl/cVKe0m). Become a Premium Subscriber: http://www.smrt.me/smrt/live Premium Subscribers receive: - Two 1-hour lessons per week with a Canadian or American teacher - Video-marked homework & assignments - Quizzes & exams - Official Smrt English Certification - Weekly group video chats This video is on how to write a successful persuasive, opinion-based academic essay in English. Students will learn how to structure and organize an opinion essay and will be given tips to make their essays successful. Join the Facebook group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/leofgroup If you would like to support the stream, you can donate here: https://goo.gl/eUCz92 Exercise: http://smrtvideolessons.com/2013/07/26/opinion-essay-or-persuasive-essay/ Learn English with Shaun at the Canadian College of English Language! http://www.canada-english.com
Views: 370363 Smrt English
How to Write a Critique Essay (An Evaluation Essay_
 
09:26
Defines the five common parts of a critique essay and provides a formula for completing each part.
Views: 348806 David Taylor
How to Write an Argumentative Essay - Planning
 
05:50
Introducing the British Council’s How to Write an Argumentative Essay animated video series. This is the first of five simple and easy to follow videos that will show you how you can improve your writing. We will look at: • Planning and question analysis • Writing a paragraph • Introduction and conclusion • Counter paragraph • Editing The British Council is committed to sharing our expertise in English language learning. This series is a comprehensive online tuition guide, taking you through all the key elements you need for a good piece of argumentative essay writing. This series is particularly relevant to secondary school students struggling with their English curriculum. For more information on our courses, check out our website http://www.britishcouncil.sg/english/courses-secondary or use our other free resources at learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org. Alternatively, to speak to one of our customer service advisors, please contact us at: Napier Road Centre +65 6653 6042 Marsiling Centre +65 6653 6044 Tampines Centre +65 6653 6063 Toa Payoh Centre +65 6653 6045 You can also follow us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/BritishCouncilSingapore), or Twitter (@sgBritish). Enjoy the videos!
Views: 501025 britishcouncilsg
Text Analysis Song!
 
01:23
Written for a class. It's still new, which is why it's not memorized yet.
Views: 341 pokinoiombra
IB Lang/Lit Paper 1 insane tip!
 
11:46
Instead of memorizing English words, use this tip to bring up your grade in Paper 1! DM me on insta if you have any questions @iblikecole I found out the creator of this acronym! It is Mr. Peter Curry from ISM. DM Mf you want to ask a question or grab a coffee. It's likely the former, hoping the (latte)r. Liked this video? Didn't? I'd love some feedback from you! I'm trying to improve my content, be as brutally honest as you need to be. Fill in the form to give your input: https://goo.gl/forms/wAs1kjm0RaZDkxhF2
Views: 109354 IB like Cole
Comparison / Contrast Essays
 
04:25
Watch Shaun's Smrt Live Class live for free on YouTube every Thursday at 17 00 GMT (17 00 GMT = https://goo.gl/cVKe0m). Become a Premium Subscriber: http://www.smrt.me/smrt/live Premium Subscribers receive: - Two 1-hour lessons per week with a Canadian or American teacher - Video-marked homework & assignments - Quizzes & exams - Official Smrt English Certification - Weekly group video chats In this video, we will discuss the structure and organization of a comparison/contrast essay. Students will learn the different styles of comparing and contrasting, and after the video, will be able to organize and write a more effective essay. Join the Facebook group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/leofgroup If you would like to support the stream, you can donate here: https://goo.gl/eUCz92 Exercise: http://smrtvideolessons.com/2013/07/26/comparison-contrast-essays/ Learn English with Shaun at the Canadian College of English Language! http://www.canada-english.com
Views: 426702 Smrt English
Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide
 
06:51
The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark Nb: it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 794637 Kent Löfgren
What is..? textual analysis
 
44:32
Presented by Imelda McDermott and Jonathan Hammond. Although discourse analysis has gained popularity in social research, there has been less attention on linguistic analysis of texts. Text analysis is an essential part of discourse analysis and this kind of ‘micro’ analysis provides a valuable supplement to other methods of analysis. This session showed examples of how to analyse both spoken (interviews) and written (policy documents) texts.
Views: 11691 methodsMcr
How to analyze a print advertisement
 
03:25
Media Literacy lesson taught through the analysis of a print ad
Views: 22871 Isabel Gagne
IELTS Writing task 1: Pie chart lesson
 
20:22
Learn how to describe Pie Charts in IELTS to receive a band 9. In this lesson you'll see: - sample question - step-by-step guide to write a band 9 answer - useful vocabulary You can find a text version of this lesson (+ online exercise) here: http://ielts-up.com/writing/pie-chart.html
Views: 1716123 IELTS-up Online lessons
The Lieutenant by Kate Grenville| Essay question breakdown | Lisa Tran
 
10:59
"LEFT"enant, not "Lieutenant"! // related content Text Response Recipe for SUCCESS: http://bit.ly/2j84sNF ‘Must-Know’ Text Response Tips: http://bit.ly/2j8an5k Year 12: How to turn Text Response essays from Average to A+: http://bit.ly/2qVQRtR Introduction to Text Response (Reading and Creating): http://bit.ly/2CG01Vi “Studying English?” Priming for Battle - http://bit.ly/2CCRsdY // what I'm reading Joyful Stains: http://bit.ly/2EeFvaY // R E S O U R C E S 💌 Join the #lisasstudyguides mailing list | http://bit.ly/maillisasstudyguides 📚 Ultimate VCE English Study Guide | Written by me! | http://bit.ly/ultimateenglishpack 💫 Private Tutoring for VCE students | Want me to be your tutor? | http://bit.ly/privatevcetutoring 🎥 How to achieve A+ in Language Analysis online course | Watch sample videos | http://bit.ly/languageanalysis // F O L L O W ▸ blog | http://bit.ly/bloglisasstudyguides ▸ instagram | http://instagram.com/lisasstudyguides ▸ facebook | http://facebook.com/vcestudyguides // C O N T A C T M E 💌 [email protected] 📮 Lisa's Study Guides PO BOX 2036 Forest Hill 3131 VIC // A B O U T Hi! I'm Lisa and I make English interesting, relevant, and do I dare say - FUN! English is a subject we all have to study at some point, why not turn it into something much more than just a chore? Follow me and learn how to be successful in high school English while actually enjoying yourself! Subscribe to Lisa's Study Guides to get inspired by new videos weekly! http://bit.ly/sublisasstudyguides // C R E D I T S Michelle Xin (Script writer and Lisa's Study Guides' tutor) Sarah Wong (Animator): behance.net/sarahwongma8e2 Alex Tran (Video editor)
Views: 2689 Lisa's Study Guides
MLA In-Text Citations (Step-by-Step Guide)
 
10:19
If you're confused on how to cite sources in research papers, you're not alone! Check out this video for a step-by-step guide on using MLA source citation within your paper.
Views: 587236 HSLanguageArts