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Your future tech may rely on deep-sea mining
 
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As the demand grows for the metals that power electronics, we may have to look farther and farther for mining opportunities. The next big mining frontier is the deep sea: along the seafloor, mysterious vents shoot scalding hot fluid into the ocean. These vents are a haven for miraculous and unique sea life, but they’re also home to highly concentrated (and very valuable) metals. What happens if we decide that the metals are worth more than the life? Thank you to Ocean Exploration Trust for allowing us to use clips from their deep sea footage. You can follow their next expedition season here: www.nautiluslive.org Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2FqJZMl Like Verge Science on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2hoSukO Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2Kr29B9 Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/7ZeLvX Read More: http://www.theverge.com Community guidelines: http://bit.ly/2D0hlAv Subscribe to Verge on YouTube for explainers, product reviews, technology news, and more: http://goo.gl/G5RXGs
Views: 192881 Verge Science
Deep-sea mining could transform the globe
 
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Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 59928 The Economist
TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush
 
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Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an unexploded hydrogen bomb off the coast of Spain and exploring the famous RMS Titanic in the 1980s. Alvin and its first female pilot, Cindy Van Dover, were the first to discover hydrothermal vents, which are underwater springs where plumes of black smoke and water pour out from underneath the earth's crust. The vents were inhabited by previously unknown organisms that thrived in the absence of sunlight. After 40 years of exploration, Alvin got a high-tech upgrade. The storied submersible is now outfitted with high-resolution cameras to provide a 245-degree viewing field and a robotic arm that scientists can use to pull samples of rock and ocean life to then study back on land. But scientists are not the only ones interested in the ocean. These days the new gold rush is not in the hills, it is in the deep sea. For thousands of years miners have been exploiting the earth in search of precious metals. As resources on dry land are depleted, now the search for new sources of metals and minerals is heading underwater. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's national ocean service estimates that there is more than $150tn in gold waiting to be mined from the floor of the world's oceans. "The industry is moving very, very fast. They have far more financial resources than the scientific community," says Cindy Van Dover, Alvin's first female pilot and Duke University Oceanography Professor. Seabed mining is still in the planning stages, but Nautilus Minerals, a Canadian mining company, says it has the technology and the contracts in place with the island nation of Papua New Guinea to start mining in its waters in about two years. What is the future of seabed mining? And what are the consequences of seabed mining for the marine ecosystems? Can science and industry co-exist and work together on viable and sustainable solutions? - Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check out our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 73210 Al Jazeera English
SEABED MINING
 
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The impacts of seabed mining.
Views: 547 GreenhouseCartoons
Ocean Minerals & Deep Sea Mining
 
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Deep Sea Mining opens up a number of opportunities for countries to get their hands on rare and useful ocean minerals. But is Deep Sea Mining safe, or will it cause more harm to the ocean floors? Watch to find out.. 1:38-1:46 Source :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1koFEKfmLw Music Credits : - Under Water - Silent Partner https://youtu.be/H3m94UQ6rcg - You by myuu https://soundcloud.com/myuu Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... Music provided by Music for Creators https://youtu.be/DR9s88XLBf0
Views: 2796 GnY TV
Scientists fear deep-sea mining
 
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Scientists fear that even before one of the last frontiers of exploration, the ocean deep, has been properly studied it will already have been exploited by commercial deep-sea mining looking for rare euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.
Views: 7256 euronews Knowledge
How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea
 
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Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals has reached an agreement with the government of Papua New Guinea to begin mining an area of seabed believed to be rich in gold and copper ores, according to the BBC. Under the terms of the agreement, Papua New Guinea will contribute $120 million to the operation and receive a 15 percent share in the mine. Environmentalists say the mine will devastate the area and cause long-lasting damage to the environment. The BBC reports that "the mine will target an area of hydrothermal vents where superheated, highly acidic water emerges from the seabed, where it encounters far colder and more alkaline seawater, forcing it to deposit high concentrations of minerals." The report continues: The result is that the seabed is formed of ores that are far richer in gold and copper than ores found on land. Mike Johnston, chief executive of Nautilus Minerals told the BBC "that a temperature probe left in place for 18 months was found to have 'high grade copper all over it'." Nautilus announced in April that it had completed its bulk cutter, the first component of its Seafloor Production Tools system, which will be used to mine the seabed. Nautilus also approximately 500,000 square kilometres of "highly prospective exploration acreage" in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga, as well as in international waters in the eastern Pacific, the company said in a press release. ----------------------------------------­­---------------------------------------­-­---------------- Next Animation Studio’s News Direct service provides daily, high-quality, informative 3D news animations that fill in for missing footage and help viewers understand breaking news stories or in-depth features on science, technology, and health. Sign up for a free trial of News Direct's news animations at http://newsdirect.nextanimationstudio.com/trial/ To subscribe to News Direct or for more info, please visit: http://newsdirect.nextanimationstudio.com
Views: 32885 News Direct
Seabed Mining in the Deep Sea
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) 0:16 - Main Presentation - Lisa Levin 28:24 - Audience Discussion Given the growing demand for deep sea metals created by electronic and green technologies, scientists are faced with decisions about whether to engage in baseline and impacts research that enables development of a new extraction industry, and whether to contribute expertise to the development of environmental protections and guidelines. Lisa A. Levin, distinguished professor of biological oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, addresses the ethical and societal challenges of exploitation in a relatively unknown realm. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [6/2018] [Show ID: 32160]
Advanced subsea diamnond mining vessel goes to work
 
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Designed by Marin Teknikk and built by Kleven Verft, Norway, the US$157 million vessel will enable Debmarine Namibia, a 50/50 joint venture between the Government of the Republic of Namibia and De Beers Group, to explore diamond deposits and secure diamond supply in the country well into the future
Views: 6790 marinelogcom
JPI Oceans: Ecological Aspects of Deep-Sea Mining
 
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In 1989 German ocean researchers started a unique long-term experiment off the coast of Peru. To explore the effects of potential deep sea mining on the seabed, they plowed in about eleven square kilometer area around the seabed. (c) GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel 2016
Views: 2114 GEOMAR Kiel
LEGASEA SEABED MINING
 
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The Ocean plays a huge part in our great Kiwi lifestyle. Kiwis Against Seabed Mining need your help to protect our Ocean from Seabed Mining. Join us and make your submission NOW - http://kasm.org.nz/submission Check out more epic fishing action at: http://www.ultimatefishing.tv
Views: 1020 Ultimate Fishing
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy
 
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Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode webseries dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This webseries addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy is a cartographical survey of technologies that have contributed to ocean literacy and seabed mapping. Structured around a single shot along a vertical axis, the episode inquires about deep sea mining and the types of geologic formations where it is set to occur, particularly hydrothermal vents. Understanding the process of deep sea mining demands not only a temporal investigation – its main dates, legal, and corporate landmarks, and scientific breakthroughs – but also a spatial axis connecting the seafloor to outer space cartographic technologies. After all, we know less about the ocean depths than about the universe beyond this blue planet. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: http://www.deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ http://www.savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ http://deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 http://oceanolivre.org/ https://www.facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Ann Dom, Armin Linke, Birgit Schneider, Duncan Currie, Katherine Sammler, Lisa Rave, Lucielle Paru, Matt Gianni, Natalie Lowrey, Payal Sampat, Phil Weaver, Stefan Helmreich, and everyone who helped this webseries. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. Commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy. www.tba21academy.org http://www.tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282
Views: 2704 Inhabitants
Sea mining could destroy underwater Lost City
 
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Scientists believe life on earth may have begun in a place called ‘The Lost City’, deep beneath the mid Atlantic ocean. But now a United Nations agency has assigned this part of the seabed to Poland for mining exploration purposes. But scientists say that miners may inadvertently destroy precious species and geological structures in their quest for minerals. Sky’s Economics Editor Ed Conway reports. SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: iPad https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/Sky-N... iPhone https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n... Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de...
Views: 7579 Sky News
Exploring Our Sea Floor Production Equipment and How It Will Work
 
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Join us as we highlight our sea floor production vessels and show and describe how our first location, Solwara1, will work. This video is full of information and explores in's and out's of how all of our equipment will work together to mine the sea floor.
Views: 3493 Nautilus Minerals
ENS351 Deep Sea Mining
 
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Description
Views: 7443 brooke Frohloff
Mining at the Bottom of the Bering Sea During an Arctic Winter | Gold Divers
 
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With The summer season over, 3 teams of miners dive under the ice to dredge gold on the floor of the Bering Sea. Subscribe to Discovery TV for more great clips: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=DiscoveryTV Follow Discovery on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/DiscoveryUK
Views: 359167 Discovery UK
Seabed Mining Goldrush
 
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“We are now seeing this happening in a number of places where they’re thinking of taking off the entire crust, which would basically devastate and destroy the whole ecosystem,” Mr Carl-Gustaf Lundin, IUCN You can view this video and the full video archive on the Dukascopy TV page: http://www.dukascopy.com/tv/en/#184901 Смотрите Dukascopy TV на вашем языке: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvrussian 用您的语言观看杜高斯贝电视: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvchinese Miren Dukascopy TV en su idioma: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvspanish Schauen Sie Dukascopy TV in Ihrer Sprache: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvgerman Regardez la Dukascopy TV dans votre langue: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvfrench Veja a TV Dukascopy na sua língua: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvpt
Views: 578 Dukascopy TV (EN)
Surface mining vs. Deep sea mining
 
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Woods Hole senior scientist Dr. Maurice A. Tivey explains why there's been interest in mining minerals such as copper and gold at the bottom of the sea.
Views: 310 Maggie Mazzetti
Legal Pathways for Addressing Environmental Harm in Deep Seabed Mining Activities
 
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Everyone is aware of off-shore oil rigs; these platforms drill down underwater for valuable resources just off the coast of many nations. But, deep in the ocean beyond national aquatic boundaries lies an abundance of natural resources such as gold, copper, manganese and zinc. State-sponsored companies are surveying and staking claim to these resources, but so far, no one has been granted approval to begin extracting them. The International Seabed Authority (ISA) — the governing body that oversees all activities in international waters (known as the Area) — is currently developing regulations for the extraction of marine minerals. Rules and procedures that govern liability for damage arising from mining activities will be crucial aspect of this regulatory framework. Who is responsible when an environmental disaster occurs as a result of mining activities? To assist in clarifying these legal issues of responsibility and liability, the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), the Commonwealth Secretariat and the Secretariat of the International Seabed Authority established the Liability Issues for Deep Seabed Mining project. Under the direction of Neil Craik (CIGI), Hannah Lily (Commonwealth Secretariat) and Alfonso Ascencio-Herrera (ISA Secretariat), this project seeks to provide a foundational understanding of key questions surrounding the further development of liability rules.
Seabed Mining Concern in Ba 1
 
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Hear the plight of the landowners along the Ba river. Seabed mining exploration machineries already in position ready to dredged the river where most villagers fetched their livelihood from.Is justice served to these poor natives?
Views: 1037 Leca Vunibobo
Seabed mining temporarily banned
 
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A moratorium on seabed mining has been placed on the NT's coastal waters to allow for an environmental impact assessment to be completed.
PNG DEEP SEA MINING BBC NEWS AT TEN
 
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Plans for the world's first deep sea mine are taking shape in the waters off Papua New Guinea. The ocean floor is rich in gold, copper and other minerals in big demand around the world. But some scientists warn that digging up the seabed will destroy marine life, and Sir David Attenborough is among those objecting. BBC News science editor David Shukman reports.
Views: 3235 David Shukman
Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4
 
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Nautilus Animated Industrial that shows a sterilized version of the Deep Sea mining process.
Views: 26662 Arnie
Race to the bottom? India plans deep dive for seabed minerals
 
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In the 1870 Jules Verne classic "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea", underwater explorer Captain Nemo predicted the mining of the ocean floor's mineral bounty - zinc, iron, silver and gold. India is catching up with that only now, as it prepares to unearth treasures down below, aiming to boost its economy. The floor of the world's seas is scattered with vast beds of black potato-shaped polymetallic nodules comprising copper, nickel, cobalt, manganese, iron and rare earth elements. These natural goodies are key to making modern gadgets, from smartphones and laptops to pacemakers, hybrid cars and solar panels. As expanding technology and infrastructure fuel global demand for these resources - whose supply is dwindling fast onshore - more and more countries, including manufacturing powerhouses India and China, are eyeing the ocean. Read full story: http://www.thisisplace.org/i/?id=422fdb8b-c6d4-4620-a6d7-1754aca1f9c8 ABOUT THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION The Thomson Reuters Foundation acts to promote the highest standards in journalism and spread the practice of legal pro bono worldwide. The organisation runs free services that provide individuals and organisations with vital access to information and services around the globe: free legal assistance to NGOs and social enterprises, editorial coverage of the world’s under-reported news, media development and training, and Trust Conference (http://www.trustconference.com). Read our news: http://news.trust.org/ Learn more: http://www.trust.org/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TR_Foundation or Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Thomson.Reuters.Foundation/ We welcome all comments that contribute constructively to the debate. We have the right to remove any posting if, in our opinion, your post does not comply with the content standards set out in the Acceptable Use Policy on http://news.trust.org/.
DEEP SEA MINING - destroying the oceans
 
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DEEP SEA MINING - deep ocean mining just around the corner. w​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several pacific island nations questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods. breaking the surface - the future of deep sea mining in the pacific. - david heydon founder & chairman of deepgreen resources discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. png locals fight sea mining project. several pacific island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. the world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offshore from the pacific island nation of papua new guinea in early 2018. deep ocean mining: the new frontier. under pressure: deep sea minerals in the pacific. an exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers... deep sea mining.
Views: 793 Love Science
Seabed mining in New Zealand
 
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The Government is set on opening New Zealand coasts for seabed mining. This has been mandated without public consultation or conversation, and may have devastating consequences, as well as offering little economic benefit. Gareth Hughes discusses the David and Goliath courtroom battles and scientific background with community group KASM.
Views: 589 NZ Green Party
ABC Catalyst S12E16 Deep Sea Mining
 
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A documentary segment about hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor. No copyright infringement intended. Video remains property of ABC.
Views: 13489 ironfalcon100
The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific
 
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The ocean has a wealth of resources. From food, to travel, to pharmaceutical needs, and to energy, the ocean has always provided for mankind. And now, mankind is turning to the ocean for minerals and metals needed for the technology we use in our everyday lives. An exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers. Read more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/underwater-mining-pacific-ocean
Views: 1470 Pulitzer Center
Ban Seabed Mining the Top End
 
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Just like taking a bulldozer to the sea floor, destructive seabed mining threatens our Top End coasts and lifestyle. It has never been allowed before in Australia, but we know that there are many locations across the Territory coast where seabed mining has already been approved or where applications to mine exist. Destructive seabed mining would decimate our marine life, pollute our waters, threaten our fishing and destroy sites of cultural significance. Sign the petition asking the Gunner Government to ban seabed mining for good - https://www.topendcoasts.org.au/seabed_mining_no_way
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 2: Deep Frontiers
 
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Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg instagram: inhabitants_tv #inhabitants Written by anthropologist Stefan Helmreich, What is Deep Sea Mining? Episode 2: Deep Frontiers is a brief history about knowledge of the deep sea and its resources. It highlights the ambiguity of this history, as depictions of the deep changed throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Today, this knowledge informs discussions about the commercialization of biological and geological resources, with the deep sea fast becoming a zone of international dispute, opening up a debate about sustainable practices at sea. What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode web series dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This web series addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Stefan Helmreich is Professor of Anthropology at MIT. He is the author of Alien Ocean: Anthropological Voyages in Microbial Seas, and, most recently, of Sounding the Limits of Life: Essays in the Anthropology of Biology and Beyond (Princeton University Press, 2016). His essays have appeared in Critical Inquiry, Representations, American Anthropologist, Cabinet, and The Wire. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 oceanolivre.org/ facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Stefan Helmreich, Matt Gianni, and everyone who helped this web series. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Commissioned by TBA21 - Academy. FB: TBA21–Academy @TBA.Academy Instagram: @tba21academy web: tba21.org/ tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282 #deepseamining
Views: 380 Inhabitants
Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific
 
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Several Pacific Island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. With a recent surge in commercial interest the Pacific has now become the centre of an international debate over whether the sustainable economic benefits for Pacific Islanders will outweigh the environmental risks of harvesting these precious metals from the bottom of the sea. This short film examines the issue from a number of key perspectives including; anti-deep sea mining NGO's; politicians; government agencies; deep sea mining companies and; the Secretariat of the Pacific Community.
Views: 12037 Steve Menzies
The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth
 
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The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be greater. From a vast wealth of resources to clues about the origins of life, the race is on to the final frontier The Okeanos Explorer, the American government state-of-the-art vessel, designed for every type of deep ocean exploration from discovering new species to investigating shipwrecks. On board, engineers and scientists come together to answer questions about the origins of life and human history. Today the Okeanos is on a mission to investigate the wreck of a World War one submarine. Engineer Bobby Moore is part of a team who has developed the technology for this type of mission. The “deep discover”, a remote operating vehicle is equipped with 20 powerful LED lights and designed to withstand the huge pressure four miles down. Equivalent to 50 jumbo jets stacked on top of a person While the crew of the Okeanos send robots to investigate the deep, some of their fellow scientists prefer a more hands-on approach. Doctor Greg stone is a world leading marine biologist with over 8,000 hours under the sea. He has been exploring the abyss in person for 30 years. The technology opening up the deep is also opening up opportunity. Not just to witness the diversity of life but to glimpse vast amounts of rare mineral resources. Some of the world's most valuable metals can be found deep under the waves. A discovery that has begun to pique the interest of the global mining industry. The boldest of mining companies are heading to the deep drawn by the allure of a new Gold Rush. But to exploit it they're also beating a path to another strange new world. In an industrial estate in the north of England, SMD is one of the world's leading manufacturers of remote underwater equipment. The industrial technology the company has developed has made mining possible several kilometers beneath the ocean surface. With an estimated 150 trillion dollars’ worth of gold alone, deep-sea mining has the potential to transform the global economy. With so much still to discover, mining in the deep ocean could have unknowable impact. It's not just life today that may need protecting; reaching the deep ocean might just allow researchers to answer some truly fundamental questions. Hydrothermal vents, hot springs on the ocean floor, are cracks in the Earth's crust. Some claim they could help scientists glimpse the origins of life itself. We might still be years away from unlocking the mysteries of the deep. Even with the latest technology, this kind of exploration is always challenging. As the crew of the Okeanos comes to terms with a scale of the challenge and the opportunity that lies beneath, what they and others discover could transform humanity's understanding of how to protect the ocean. It's the most hostile environment on earth, but the keys to our future may lie in the deep. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 2683547 The Economist
Deep sea mining!? Leave my down below alone!
 
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Mr Smashing makes a comeback with a deep sea mining disco love song. Destroying the deep sea to get metals for our throw-away mobile phones and other e-devices? Seas At Risk thinks it is better to step up efforts on the circular economy – make devices repairable, re-usable, recyclable. Use mineral resources more efficiently and keep them in the economy loop instead of wasting them. In our leaflet ‘Deep sea mining? Stop and think!’ you can read why we think deep sea mining has no place in the world’s Agenda 2030 for sustainable development. Let’s focus on creating a circular economy instead! http://www.seas-at-risk.org/images/pdf/Infographics/DSM-PDF-leaflet-light.pdf
Views: 7657 Seas At Risk
DEEP SEA MINING | Ocean Mining
 
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Try to balance the struggles of making a profit while only making a minimal impact on the environment. https://crystalline-green-ltd.itch.io/ocean-mining Don't forget to like, comment and subscribe. Twitter: https://twitter.com/yeager11981 Wanna play with me? Steam: Yeagerbr Xbox Gamertag: Yeagerbr 3DS Friend code: 3196-4238-0461
Views: 326 Yeagerbr
World's First Deep-Sea Mining Project A Go
 
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Canadian company Nautilus Minerals has received the green light to start mining for gold and copper a mile down. The company will be working off the coast of Papua New Guinea. The job has environmental activists more than concerned. Mashable content. http://www.mashable.com LIKE us on FACEBOOK: http://facebook.com/mashable.video FOLLOW us on TWITTER: http://twitter.com/mashablevideo FOLLOW us on TUMBLR: http://mashable.tumblr.com FOLLOW our INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/mashable JOIN our circle on GOOGLE PLUS: http://plus.google.com/+Mashable Subscribe!: http://bit.ly/1ko5eNd Mashable is the leading independent news site for all things tech, social media, and internet culture. http://www.youtube.com/mashable
Views: 1752 Mashable
Seabed Mining - Nautilus Minerals CEO Mike Johnston talks to Global Island News
 
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Nautilus Minerals CEO, Mike Johnston, talks of the opportunity that seafloor mining provides to secure high quality minerals at lower cost, both economically and environmentally, in comparison to terrestrial mines, to meet increasing demand.
Views: 2112 Global Island News
Advance Nauru Deep Sea Mining
 
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The government of Nauru is going to new depths to build more revenue for the future of the country by joining a pioneering venture that could soon power the world’s green economy.
Views: 1037 Nauru TV News
Josh Kronfeld on seabed mining
 
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Former All Black Josh Kronfeld talks about the dangers of seabed mining and urges people to make their voices heard. Make a submission - now: http://kasm.org.nz/submission
Seabed Mining In The Deep – What Is There? Is It Profitable? Is It Time To Join The Gold Rush?
 
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Does seabed mining make economic sense? What are the environmental and commercial risks if this goes ahead? Who will lose money on seabed mining? Why do you think this matters to coastal investors and ocean lovers? Carl Gustaf Lundin, Principal Marine and Polar Scientist, IUCN. You can view this video and the full video archive on the Dukascopy TV page: http://www.dukascopy.com/tv/en/#262499 Смотрите Dukascopy TV на вашем языке: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvrussian 用您的语言观看杜高斯贝电视: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvchinese Miren Dukascopy TV en su idioma: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvspanish Schauen Sie Dukascopy TV in Ihrer Sprache: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvgerman Regardez la Dukascopy TV dans votre langue: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvfrench Veja a TV Dukascopy na sua língua: http://www.youtube.com/user/dukascopytvpt
Views: 30 Dukascopy TV (EN)
Bishops on Seabed Mining
 
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Views: 8 NBC PNG
BBC News - UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals_2
 
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UK firm in deep sea mining plan for minerals_2
Views: 795 A ashwinanil
NZ Government Seabed Mining Agenda Exposed
 
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NZ Government Seabed Mining Agenda Exposed! Phil McCabe http://www.thevinnyeastwoodshow.com/show-archives/nz-government-seabed-mining-agenda-exposed-phil-mccabe Phil McGabe www.kasm.org.nz After opening up New Zealand's regional parks for mining, The government realised that harvesting minerals from the sea floor is the new game in town. International momentum and attention from businesses and government have spurred this move, Currently, there are many countries looking at programs for exploitation. New Zealand holds the 5th largest marine estate in the world, Up to 200 Nautical Miles away from the land is marked as it's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) Accounting for roughly 1% of the planet's surface, So the potential mining interests and associated risks are voluminous to say the least. New Zealand isn't the first country to "OK" Seabed mining, In the case of Papua New Guinea, The Community didn’t know about it, Until AFTER they’d already consented. And the process for approval here, isn't exactly above water either, so to speak. READ MORE: http://www.thevinnyeastwoodshow.com/show-archives/nz-government-seabed-mining-agenda-exposed-phil-mccabe Cheers guys for reading this all the way to the end, If you do donate or contact them, let em know it came from The Vinny Eastwood Show :) Just want you to know I'm 100% listener funded, it takes a lot of work to organise, edit, upload and share these interviews by myself, so I do hope you consider flicking a few dollars a month my way via automatic payment. NZ Gifts And AP's Kiwibank: 38-9010-0455296-00 Name: GUERILLA MEDIA or through patreon https://www.patreon.com/user?u=4321806 If you do donate (or already have) send me your facebook name at https://www.facebook.com/VinnyEastwoodShow/?ref=hl and I'll add you to the secret and EXCLUSIVE Vinny Eastwood Donors group, Plus, you'll get early access to brand new episodes before they're made public! Thank you so much for supporting me all these years everyone :) Vinny Eastwood MR NEWS home page www.thevinnyeastwoodshow.com Youtube Channel: wwwyoutube.com/c/vinnyeastwoodnz
Views: 987 Vinny Eastwood
HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER   MINING MINERALS IN THE DEEP OCEAN  MAGANESE NODULE RECOVERY  22324
 
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“Oceanography: Mining Mineral In The Ocean” is an issue of the Science Screen Report, presented by United Technologies Sikorsky Aircraft, that discusses the potential and problems of have deep-sea mining for minerals. The issue opens with shots of the sea, which is a “reserve of global resources,” including metals from deep-sea nodules (polymetallic nodules). These nodules cover vast areas of the sea bottom, and their potential is the reason for a major deep-ocean project being carried out. Deep Sea Nodules can be the size of potatoes, and their porous structure accumulates layers of various metals. They are very slow growing, but sizeable nodules cover areas of the sea floor, providing a significant reserve of metals. As part of the project to determine the mining feasibility of nodules, the first self-propelled robot miner (01:38) is developed and tested. Scientists examine nodules in a lab (02:52), but to answer a number of questions surrounding them, the National Science Foundation uses Research Vessel Melvillle (03:12) to carry out underwater tests. Members of the crew lower sound beacons to create a grid (03:35). Then a robot mapping vehicle is lowered into the water to gather data within the grid. In the control room (04:10), the team monitors the robot’s data. The next step is the collection of sea floor samples (05:08); a box corer is lowered into the water to gather sample nodules, transporting nodules and their environment to the surface. Scientists examine the contents, conduct tests, and record data. The results indicate nodules may grow similar to coral. Next, piston corers (06:52) are used to take out samples of core sections of the floor to add to the mission’s overall understanding. After two weeks, the samples and data are collected, stored, and made accessible to over 50 research centers throughout the world. The next phase involves exploration ship Governor Ray (08:06), which monitors a sea mining research site, and Glomar Explorer (08:22), a surface platform ship (originally built as a deep-sea recovery platform for the CIA as part of Project Azorian also known as Project Jennifer) with an internal dry dock that holds the advanced robot miner. The crew preps for launch day by filling the dry dock, opening the doors (11:00), and moving the robot miner into the water. The robot miner hangs under the ship as pipe attachments are installed, connecting the miner and processor to transport nodule slurry. The robot miner is positioned and the processor is attached to it, enabling the mining operation to begin (12:18). Sonar and TV images show how easily the miner collects nodules as is moves across sea floor capturing images and harvesting nodules, which are crushed into a slurry and piped up to the ship. A commercial miner would be 10 times the size of the robot miner, but the smaller robot miner is the first step in the eventual commercial mining of the sea’s unique nodules. Background on this ... historic film is that it shows techniques used to conduct deep ocean mining of the sea floor, which were pioneered in the 1960s. The potential for this type of mining (particularly of manganese nodules) was never fully realized. Ironically, the program did end up providing the cover for the USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), a deep-sea drillship platform built for the United States Central Intelligence Agency Special Activities Division secret operation Project Azorian to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, lost in April 1968. Hughes Glomar Explorer (HGE), as the ship was called at the time, was built between 1973 and 1974, by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for more than US$350 million at the direction of Howard Hughes for use by his company, Global Marine Development Inc. This is equivalent to $1.67 billion in present-day terms. She set sail on 20 June 1974. Hughes told the media that the ship's purpose was to extract manganese nodules from the ocean floor. This marine geology cover story became surprisingly influential, spurring many others to examine the idea. But in sworn testimony in United States district court proceedings and in appearances before government agencies, Global Marine executives and others associated with Hughes Glomar Explorer project unanimously maintained that the ship could not be used in any economically viable ocean mineral operation. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 1223 PeriscopeFilm
Nautilus mining explained.VOB
 
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Activists talk about the proposed deep sea mining operations by Nautilus.
Views: 2752 OceansWatch
Kiwis Against Seabed Mining 2012
 
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KASM are a spontaneous community-based action group, who strongly oppose any non-essential seabed mining. Our objectives are to raise public awareness of current proposals to mine the New Zealand seabed and coastline, educate and inform the public as to the consequences of those proposals, and ensure that current and future governments stop considering these and any future 
seabed mining operations. In so doing, we intend to protect and preserve these unique areas of coastline for future generations to enjoy. We are a non-political, non-profit organisation, funded by membership subscriptions and donations, whose opinions reflect wider public sentiment. video produced by KASM http://kasm.org.nz/
Views: 274 Juan Duazo
Cardinal Sir John Ribat speaks out against experimental seabed mining
 
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The world's first project to mine the seabed for minerals is expected to begin operations in Papua New Guinea in 2019. Experimental in nature, this mining ventured by Canadian company Nautilus Minerals is in charge of the Solwara 1 project located in the Bismarck Sea (approximately 30 kilometers from the coast of New Ireland and 50 kilometers from the coast of East New Britain. There have been reports of impacts from exploratory mining in the area affecting indigenous coastal communities of the Bismarck Sea. In this Voices from the Last Frontier documentary, His Eminence, Cardinal Sir John Ribat calls for a ban on experimental seabed mining in PNG and the Pacific. He challenges us to be responsible stewards to protect our common home. For more information about the Voices from the Last Frontier series, email: [email protected]
Views: 146 PANG Media

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