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The dangers of hyperinflation by our cartoonist KAL | The Economist
 
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In Yugoslavia in 1993 prices rose 20% a day. In Zimbabwe in 2008, inflation reached 231,000,000%. Our cartoonist KAL looks at how hyperinflation can lead to the collapse of a country's economy. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 When the prices of goods and services rise rapidly, families and businesses suffer. But on rare occasions when rising prices skyrocket out of control the result can be catastrophic hyperinflation. Hyperinflation is generally caused by reckless governments who let their money supply grow too fast. After the first world war, German prices at one point were rising at a rate of 23,000 percent a year. This caused the country's economic system to collapse, creating a political opportunity for the Nazis. More recently in the former Yugoslavia, 1993 prices rose around 20% a day. Later, in July 2008, Zimbabwe's official inflation rate reached an astonishing 231 million percent. Typically, hyperinflation quickly leads to a loss of confidence in the country's currency. With the value of their cash diminishing, citizens pursue stable items like gold and foreign currency as safe stores of wealth. Hyperinflation might not be so bad if it were stable. People and businesses could plan for the future accounting for high, but predictable prices. However, there are no examples of stable hyperinflation. By its nature, hyperinflation is an uncontrollable and dangerous phenomenon. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films every day of the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 10478 The Economist
Inflation and Bubbles and Tulips: Crash Course Economics #7
 
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In which Adriene and Jacob teach you about how and why prices rise. Sometimes prices rise as a result of inflation, which is a pretty normal thing for economies to do. We'll talk about how across the board prices rise over time, and how economists track inflation. Bubbles are a pretty normal thing for humans to do. One item, like tulips or beanie babies or houses or tech startups experience a rapid rise in prices. This is often accompanied by speculation, a bunch of outrageous profits, and then a nasty crash when the bubble bursts. People get excited about rising prices, and next thing you know, people are trading their life savings for a tulip bulb. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark , Elliot Beter, Moritz Schmidt, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Jacob Ash, Jessica Wode, Today I Found Out, Christy Huddleston, James Craver, Chris Peters, SR Foxley, Steve Marshall, Simun Niclasen, Eric Kitchen, Robert Kunz, Avi Yashchin, Jason A Saslow, Jan Schmid, Daniel Baulig, Christian , Anna-Ester Volozh -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 850691 CrashCourse
How to prepare for the next global recession | The Economist
 
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A decade after the global recession, the world’s economy is vulnerable again. Ryan Avent, our economics columnist, considers how the next recession might happen—and what governments can do about it Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 1449205 The Economist
TWL #6: Big Mac Economics
 
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Big Macs: delicious (kinda), cheap (kinda), and educational (absolutely). In this episode, we look at how the economist magazine used burger prices to teach about purchasing power parity. If you enjoyed this video, please consider sharing on Reddit, Twitter, Facebook, etc. For a small channel like this, all exposure is extremely helpful. Twitter: @WendoverPro Email: [email protected] Attributions Big Mac footage provided by https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xx447ehsS2g McDonald’s kitchen footage provided by epSos.de Select footage provided by VideoBlocks LLC Music provided Epidemic Sound Select maps provided by OpenStreetMap Select maps provided by Google Maps Select visuals provided by Wikipedia Commons Licenses available upon request Licensed under Creative Commons 3.0 or fair use guidelines
Views: 1247443 Wendover Productions
The collapse of Venezuela, explained
 
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The country is in chaos, but its leaders aren't going anywhere. Correction at 1:58: It’s been brought to our notice that the Supreme Court tried to strip the country’s National Assembly of its powers in March 2017 and not 2016. We regret the error. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Venezuela was once the richest country in Latin America. It has the largest known oil reserves in the world and its democratic government was once praised world wide. But today, Venezuela’s democratic institutions and its economy are in shambles.The country has the highest inflation in the world, making food and medicine inaccessible to most Venezuelans. Over the last four years, its GDP has fallen 35%, which is a sharper drop than the one seen during the Great Depression in the US. The country’s murder rate has surpassed that of the most dangerous cities in the world. These conditions have sparked months of protests against the president, Nicolas Maduro. And it’s easy to see why: the country has become measurably worse since his election in 2013. Correction at 1:58: It’s been brought to our notice that the Supreme Court tried to strip the country’s National Assembly of its powers in March 2017 and not 2016. We regret the error. For more on the Supreme Court ruling: https://www.vox.com/world/2017/5/1/15408828/venezuela-protests-maduro-parliament-supreme-court-crisis Sources: 0:56 https://tradingeconomics.com/venezuela/inflation-cpi , https://tradingeconomics.com/venezuela/consumer-price-index-cpi , http://www.imf.org/external/datamapper/[email protected]/OEMDC/ADVEC/WEOWORLD/VEN?year=2017 , https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_Venezuela#/media/File:1998_to_2013_Venezuela_Murder_Rate.png https://www.reuters.com/article/us-venezuela-economy-forex-idUSKBN1AP2LM 1:25 https://www.scribd.com/document/354981596/Datanalisis-Informe-Omnibus-Julio-2017-ODH-Consultores#from_embed (Page 22) http://www.datanalisis.com/ 1:54 https://www.wsj.com/articles/maduro-s-allies-stack-venezuelas-supreme-court-1450912005 3:27 https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=24432 3:44 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Venezuela_Poverty_Rate_1997_to_2013.png 4:00 https://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21720289-over-past-year-74-venezuelans-lost-average-87kg-weight-how 4:40 https://www.cato.org/research/troubled-currencies?tab=venezuela Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Become a member of the Vox Video Lab! http://bit.ly/video-lab Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 4798374 Vox
English Vocabulary: How to talk about the economy
 
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http://www.engvid.com Let's talk business! Today you'll learn vocabulary that will help you to read and speak about the economy. We will look at common words used to discuss economic matters, such as GDP, stagnation, fiscal, and more. These words and expressions will help you read financial news articles and follow economic reports on television and online. After the lesson, take the quiz and try to practice these words by discussing economic matters in English with your co-workers and friends. Feel free to ask me questions in the comments section on engVid. http://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-how-to-talk-about-the-economy/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson, we're going to look at business English. We're going to talk about the economy. Now, we're not going to get into too much detail. We're not going to get into economic theories, etc. What we're going to look at is some vocabulary that will help you read financial articles and newspapers, or online, or watch financial broadcasts on TV; CNN, Money Matters, etc., things like that. So, we're going to look at all these words. We're going to start with "GDP" because everything somehow relates to "GDP - gross domestic product". What is this? This is the total value, the total monetary value of goods and services produced within a country. So everything that the country produces from toilet paper to airplanes, and services from massage to heart surgery, all the money that's made from these goods and services together adds up to the GDP. So, when we're talking about GDP, we're going to refer back to this expression when we're talking about some of these other words. So, first, let's look at "fiscal". "Fiscal" basically means anything to do with money, anything to do with financial matters, especially when we're talking about taxes. Okay? So, when... The most common thing you'll hear is "fiscal year". So when we're talking about a company's fiscal year, we're talking about it's the beginning of its tax year to the end of its tax year. In some countries, everybody matches this to January to December; in other countries, you're allowed... Your fiscal year starts when you start your business, and then one year later is the end of your fiscal year. It's easier to match it to the calendar year, but... A "quarter". Now, you're going to always hear about prices, and stocks, and values going up or down over the last quarter or over the last two quarters. What is a "quarter"? It's basically three months. So if you're talking about the first quarter of the year, you're talking about January, February, March. That's your first quarter. Your next three months, second quarter. Four quarters makes one year. "Currency". I think everybody knows this word, but just in case, this is the money that is used in a country or a region. This is the monetary value that is used for exchanges, trades, investments, etc. In Canada, we use the Canadian dollar. In the U.S., they use the American dollar. Euro in Europe, etc. A "budget". A "budget" or "to budget", it can be a noun or a verb, means to make a plan on how to spend a certain amount of money. So, for example, a government has this much money that they need to spend, or they have a plan that they want to spend this much money. Now, they want to spend a million dollars. I'm being very simple, here; I'm not going to get into big numbers. They need to spend a million dollars to provide all the services that they need and to buy all the materials that they need to import, etc. If they are running on a deficit, that means that they need to spend more money than they have. They have to spend on things to bring in or to run the country, but they don't have. So if I need to spend a million dollars but I only make the revenues of the country are only $900,000, then they will run on $100,000 deficit. Okay? "Surplus" is the opposite. "Surplus" is when the government or any company, you don't have to apply this to a government, when you have more money than you need for the budget. So if I need to spend a million dollars over the next year, but I have a million and a half, then I have half a million dollar surplus, which is always a good thing. "Inflation/deflation". "Inflation" is when prices of goods and services go up, but wages stay the same. So, basically, the purchase power of the individual goes down. You have the same amount of money, but you can buy fewer things or you can hire fewer people to do to have services for you. "Deflation" is the opposite. That's when prices go down, and the value of your dollar or your currency goes up. Both situations are not good.
Inflation On The Rise Puts Pressure On The Fed
 
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RTD News keeps you up to date on what's happening around the globe. Thanks for watching this important update, "Inflation On The Rise Puts Pressure On The Fed". Subscribe and share the RTD news updates so others can hear and learn... Get a better viewpoint on the side effects of inflation on the Federal Reserve Note with this Dollarcation visual aid: http://bit.ly/Purchasing_Power News Articles here: 1. Inflation rose faster than expected in January http://money.cnn.com/2018/02/14/news/economy/us-inflation/index.html 2. Consumer prices jump much more than forecast, sparking inflation fears https://www.cnbc.com/2018/02/14/us-consumer-price-index-jan-2018.html 3. What inflation? Apple and Facebook drive Wall Street rally https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-stocks/what-inflation-apple-and-facebook-drive-wall-street-rally-idUSKCN1FY1PO 4. Rise in U.S. inflation puts spotlight on Fed's Powell https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-economy/rise-in-u-s-inflation-puts-spotlight-on-feds-powell-idUSKCN1FY0GG 5. Rising inflation rekindles a big market fear from the 1970s https://www.cnbc.com/2018/02/14/inflation-rise-toward-key-level-rekindles-stagflation-fear-from-the-1970s.html 6. U.S. CPI Tops Estimates as Apparel Costs Jump Most in 30 Years https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-02-14/u-s-consumer-prices-rise-more-than-forecast-on-apparel-costs 7. Dow Drops as Too Much Inflation Rocks Stocks https://www.barrons.com/articles/dow-drops-as-too-much-inflation-rocks-stocks-1518618364 8. The Great Inflation of the 1970s https://www.investopedia.com/articles/economics/09/1970s-great-inflation.asp Connect with Rethinking the Dollar on Steemit, Facebook & Twitter for more articles here: Steemit - https://steemit.com/@rtd Twitter - https://twitter.com/RethinkinDollar Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/rtdworldnews If you would like to support Rethinking the Dollar channel please consider donating the cost of 4 grams of silver ($2) or more here: http://www.rethinkingthedollar.com/donate/ *********** RTD UNIVERSITY *********** A new monetary paradigm starts by visiting the RTD University website. Choose from over 30+ hours of monetary and financial interviews from experts that will help you think beyond the pending dollar demise - http://bit.ly/RTD_University DISCLAIMER: The financial and political opinions expressed in this interview are those of the guest and not necessarily of "Rethinking the Dollar". Opinions expressed in this video should not be relied on for making investment decisions and do not constitute personalized investment advice. The information shared is for the sole purpose of education.
Views: 1833 Rethinking The Dollar
Econ Vids for Kids: What is Inflation?
 
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What is inflation? In this video, we examine how the expansion of a money supply can occur and the effects of inflation on an economy. http://inkwellscholars.org
Views: 86207 InkwellMedia
Do we live in a multiverse? | The Economist
 
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It has long been thought that our universe is all there is, but it is possible we may live in just one of many. This is the second in our six-part series on unsolved mysteries in science. Read the accompanying article: http://www.economist.com/news/science-brief/21660968-our-second-brief-scientific-mysteries-we-ask-whether-world-might-make-more-sense. Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://econ.st/1Fsu2Vj When the ancients looked into the night sky they thought the heavens revolved around the earth and mankind. over the centuries this view has changed radically. We discovered we lived on a planet orbiting a star within the solar system and the solar system was found to be part of the Milky Way galaxy. Later we learned that our universe was filled with billions of other such galaxies - but could it be that we're committing the same error as our ancestors by thinking the universe contains everything there is? Could it be that we live in a multiverse? There are a number of different theories about what the multiverse could be. One proponent of the idea of the multiverse is Dr Tegmark of MIT. Dr Tegmark suggests a four fold classification of possible types of multiverse. The first type of multiverse is just an extension of what we already know our universe expanding into infinity rather than ending at the limits of our vision. We can look back almost to the beginning of time to the edge of the observable universe, but we can see no further. So the space beyond that distance known as the Hubble radius is literally out of sight. But that doesn't mean there isn't anything there. Because the expansion of the universe has stretched space, astronomers are able to see out to a distance of about 42 billion light years. How far things extend beyond this is unknown. If they stretch to infinity there could be numerous isolated universes cut off from one another by their own Hubble radius - depending on the observers vantage point. To understand the second type of multiverse in Dr Tegmark system it is first necessary to understand how the universe was formed and the theory of inflation. It was first conceived of by Alan Guth in 1979 and then later refined and expanded upon by Andrei Linde who had some key insights. This is one of the ideas of string theory which attempts to unify general relativity with quantum mechanics. The thinking is that all of the solutions produced by string theory that don't match up with what we can see in our own universe, may actually represent reality in other universes. The anthropic principle is the idea that our universe is fine-tuned to allow humans to live. A small fiddle with the strength of gravity for example and life as we know it would not exist - a coincidence that does not sit easily with scientists. The concept of a multiverse neatly addresses this problem within the infinite number of universes that could exist we are simply living in the one we are able to. In the third type Dr Tegmark multiverse in the first the laws of physics are the same from one to another. In this type though the component universes are separated not by distance but by time. At every moment within such a multiverse all of the possible futures allowed by the uncertainties of quantum mechanics actually happen. In the many worlds theory of the multiverse the entirety of the universe acts like the quantum photon, but instead of having two potential future states, every possible outcome would be manifested so our entire universe and everything within it, including you, would be constantly undergoing multiple visions into daughter universes - each with its own reality and future. Any given observer though would only see one outcome. In the final classification, the level 4 multiverse, Dr Tegmark proposes that all coherent mathematical systems describe a physical reality of some sort. Those different systems are of necessity different universes. What this last idea translates to in practice is hard to conceive of - it is more the province of metaphysics than physics, but the other three types of multiverse though they push the bounds of physical theory do not overstep them. Observational data supporting the theory of inflation have convinced some scientists that a multiverse is possible - but the idea is still controversial. It may be impossible to ever directly observe the multiverse but some scientists hope to eventually gather enough data supporting the theories that predict it to one day confirm its existence. If that were to happen, like the ancients before us, we would be given a whole new perspective on how the cosmos works and on our place in it. Get more The Economist Follow us: https://twitter.com/TheEconomist Like us: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist View photos: https://instagram.com/theeconomist/ The Economist videos give authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
Views: 926231 The Economist
What is quantitative easing? | The Economist
 
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Following the Federal Reserve's latest round of quantitative easing, The Economist's Buttonwood columnist Philip Coggan explains how easing monetary policy works Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://econ.st/1Fsu2Vj Get more The Economist Follow us: https://twitter.com/TheEconomist Like us: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist View photos: https://instagram.com/theeconomist/ The Economist videos give authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
Views: 132955 The Economist
How computers threaten the jobs of mid-skilled workers | The Economist
 
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The digital revolution offers great advantages but it also threatens the jobs of low and mid-skilled workers. As computers become smarter, so too must humans. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2v5mUik Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2v2vj63 Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2v7sVey Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2v1JFUm Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2uYEapk Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2v2M0yq
Views: 87638 The Economist
The Economics Behind Music Festivals | The Economist
 
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Music festivals attract 32 million revellers annually around the world. That adds up to an industry worth nearly $10bn a year. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 From the mud of Glastonbury to the blockbusting headliners of Coachella, music festivals have become big business. Annually there are around 800 music festivals in the US alone. It's an industry worth nearly $10bn, attracting 32 million revellers annually, half of whom are millennials. Tickets average £200 per head in the UK, but over the last 10 years music festival ticket prices have risen way above the rate of inflation. More than $1.5bn was spent by companies sponsoring festivals in 2014. The live music industry is booming as traditional record sales flounder. Artists can command up to 90% of gross ticket receipts but bag only 10% of the net profit from recorded music. Acts such as The Flaming Lips and Damian Marley can earn up to a reported £90,000 per performance. Whereas bigger names such as Justin Beiber and Madonna can charge up to a cool million. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 18047 The Economist
How Do Interest Rates Affect Stocks, Inflation, Business Activities in Our Economy? (1999)
 
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William "Bill" Wolman (December 14, 1927 – December 5, 2011) was a longtime chief economist at BusinessWeek magazine, and a frequent commentator on CNBC. Journalism awards presented to Bill Wolman include the John Hancock Award, National Magazine Award, Deadline Club Award and University of Missouri Journalism Award. On CNBC, Wolman often paired with Neil Cavuto, acting as a taciturn foil to Cavutos more outspoken demeanour. Born in Montreal, Canada, Wolman attended McGill University and went on to Stanford University to complete a Ph.D. in economics before he joined the economics staff at Business Week Magazine in 1960. He was married to the economist Anne Colamosca, with whom he often collaborated. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Wolman Mark Zandi is chief economist of Moody's Analytics, where he directs economic research. He is co-founder of Economy.com, which was acquired by Moody's Analytics in 2005. Prior to founding Economy.com, Zandi was a regional economist at Chase Econometrics. Dr. Zandi’s broad research interests encompass macroeconomics, financial markets and public policy. His recent research has focused on mortgage finance reform and the determinants of mortgage foreclosure and personal bankruptcy. He has analyzed the economic impact of various tax and government spending policies and assessed the appropriate monetary policy response to bubbles in asset markets. A trusted adviser[1] to policymakers and an influential source of economic analysis for businesses, journalists and the public, Dr. Zandi frequently testifies before Congress on topics including the economic outlook, the nation’s daunting fiscal challenges, the merits of fiscal stimulus, financial regulatory reform, and foreclosure mitigation. He is often quoted in national and global publications and interviewed by major news media outlets, and is a frequent guest on CNBC,[2] NPR, Meet the Press,[3] CNN,[4] and various other national networks and news programs. Zandi is also a regular op-ed contributor to the Washington Post[5] and Philadelphia Inquirer.[6] Zandi's analysis of the impact of an economic stimulus package on the United States economy was cited by Christina Romer and Jared Bernstein in their report on President Barack Obama's proposed American Recovery and Reinvestment Plan, which became the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Zandi Kelli Arena is an American television journalist and university professor, known as a former Washington D.C. correspondent for CNN. Arena is currently the Executive Director of the Global Center for Journalism and Democracy at Sam Houston State University, and holds the Dan Rather Endowed Chair. She also does work as a freelance reporter. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelli_Arena
Views: 147 Way Back
Why Are People In Venezuela Starving (Hyperinflation Explained)?
 
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The first 1,000 people to sign up to Skillshare will get their first 2 months for free: https://skl.sh/infographicsshow9_5 What is hyperinflation and what is causing Venezuelans to starve? Venezuela’s economic crisis has made headlines all over the world for the past few years. Hunger is widespread there. Unable to afford the small amount of food available in supermarkets, many Venezuelans have resorted to eating garbage to survive. Even zoo animals in Venezuela are starving according to a report by the Daily Mail, and people have been breaking into zoos to eat them. A recent survey found that the “food crisis has also created an education crisis, as more than 1 million children no longer attend school, mostly due to hunger and a lack of public services.” Moises Rendon and Mark L. Schneider of the Center for Strategic & International Studies provide a bleak assessment of Venezuela’s current situation, saying the country is suffering “an unprecedented man-made humanitarian crisis.” They say Venezuela resembles “a country at .. and notes some of its major social problems, including “extreme food and medicine shortages,” “rampant crimes in every city,” “constant electric blackouts,” and “looting and repression.” When you see and hear these stories, you can’t help but wonder what went wrong. How could a country that was once one of the most affluent countries in South America reach such a sorry state? One source of the misery in Venezuela is its out-of-control inflation, which we will examine in this episode of The Infographics Show, “Venezuelan Hyperinflation Explained.” Before we discuss Venezuelan hyperinflation, let’s begin with a discussion of what hyperinflation is in general. Simply put, hyperinflation is very high, rapid, and continuous inflation. In a hyperinflation situation, the prices of goods and services in an economy quickly rise to a level so high that they become difficult to afford for most people. While experts cannot agree what that exact level is, economist Michael K. Salemi states that hyperinflation is generally used to “describe episodes when the monthly inflation rate is greater than 50 percent.” He gives the example that “at a monthly rate of 50 percent, an item that cost $1 on January 1 would cost $130 on January 1 of the following year.” SUBSCRIBE TO US -► http://bit.ly/TheInfographicsShow -------------------------------------------------------------------------- WEBSITE (SUGGEST A TOPIC): http://theinfographicsshow.com SOCIAL: Twitter........► https://twitter.com/TheInfoShow Subreddit...► http://reddit.com/r/TheInfographicsShow -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sources for this episode: https://pastebin.com/KBmB6ePA
Views: 1322942 The Infographics Show
Is the pope head of the world's most powerful government? | The Economist
 
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Is the pope head of the world's most powerful government? The pope represents over one billion people, his government has a permanent presence at the United Nations and he runs the oldest diplomatic service on earth. We asked the man behind the Vatican's foreign policy to explain how the world's smallest country could house the world's most influential government Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2G6zUG5 Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2G6zVK9 Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2G8KyfS Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2G8MEvS Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2G7lTrW Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2G5WIpA
Views: 160300 The Economist
Olivier Blanchard on fiscal policy | The Economist
 
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Olivier Blanchard on fiscal policy The chief economist of the International Monetary Fund on macroeconomics, how to set inflation rates and why Wall Street matters Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://econ.st/1Fsu2Vj Get more The Economist Follow us: https://twitter.com/TheEconomist Like us: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist View photos: https://instagram.com/theeconomist/ The Economist videos give authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
Views: 8545 The Economist
Is Asia the dominant economic power? | The Economist
 
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Asia is regaining the economic dominance it enjoyed a millennium ago - but it still has some way to go Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://econ.st/1Fsu2Vj A thousand years ago Asia dominated the world economy, producing about two thirds of its output. Western Europe was far behind and the economy of what's now the United States barely existed. Western Europe's economy rose throughout the middle ages despite setbacks caused by plagues and conflicts. Then in the 1800s America's rise and Europe's industrial revolution combined to bring Asia's share of world GDP down sharply to just one fifth of the total by 1980. China's reforms in the 1980s boosted Asia's share of the world economy but then if you're measuring GDP using market exchange rates, its share slumped in the 1990s when the Asian economic crisis caused the regions currencies to collapse. If you now compare economies using Purchasing Power Parity, which takes into account the lower prices Asian consumers pay for goods and services on their home markets, the continents rise continues, right through the 1990s crisis. Using this more realistic way of measuring GDP Asia will produce about a third of the world's output this year. Asian countries built up their reserves of foreign currency after the 1990s crisis, especially China. This increase is often taken as a sign of Asia's growing economic clout even though its been partly reversed in recent years. Furthermore currency reserves themselves are only a few percent of the worlds total stock of the worlds financial assets. Asia's share of this broader range of assets is growing but it's still only about a fifth. The East is undoubtedly rising but its new day has barely begun. Get more The Economist Follow us: https://twitter.com/TheEconomist Like us: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist View photos: https://instagram.com/theeconomist/ The Economist videos give authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
Views: 76158 The Economist
Net Inflation: the Economy has Gone Nowhere - John Williams Interview
 
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The 1 Must Own Gold Stock: http://CrushTheStreet.com/gold VISIT GUEST: http://shadowstats.com Mr. Williams was born in 1949. He received an A.B. in Economics, cum laude, from Dartmouth College in 1971, and was awarded a M.B.A. from Dartmouth's Amos Tuck School of Business Administration in 1972, where he was named an Edward Tuck Scholar. During his career as a consulting economist, John has worked with individuals as well as Fortune 500 companies. Although I am known formally as Walter J. Williams, my friends call me “John.” For 30 years, I have been a private consulting economist and, out of necessity, had to become a specialist in government economic reporting. One of my early clients was a large manufacturer of commercial airplanes, who had developed an econometric model for predicting revenue passenger miles. The level of revenue passenger miles was their primary sales forecasting tool, and the model was heavily dependent on the GNP (now GDP) as reported by the Department of Commerce. Suddenly, their model stopped working, and they asked me if I could fix it. I realized the GNP numbers were faulty, corrected them for my client (official reporting was similarly revised a couple of years later) and the model worked again, at least for a while, until GNP methodological changes eventually made the underlying data worthless. That began a lengthy process of exploring the history and nature of economic reporting and in interviewing key people involved in the process from the early days of government reporting through the present. For a number of years I conducted surveys among business economists as to the quality of government statistics (the vast majority thought it was pretty bad), and my results led to front page stories in 1989 in the New York Times and Investors Daily (now Investors Business Daily), considerable coverage in the broadcast media and a joint meeting with representatives of all the government's statistical agencies. Nonetheless, the quality of government reporting has deteriorated sharply in the last couple of decades. Reporting problems have included methodological changes to economic reporting that have pushed headline economic and inflation results out of the realm of real-world or common experience. Over the decades, well in excess of 1,000 presentations have been given on the economic outlook, or on approaches to analyzing economic data, to clients—large and small—including talks with members of the business, banking, government, press, academic, brokerage and investment communities. I also have provided testimony before Congress (details here). An old friend—the late-Doug Gillespie—asked me some years back to write a series of articles on the quality of government statistics. The response to those writings (the Primer Series available at the top-center of this page) was so strong that we started ShadowStats.com (Shadow Government Statistics) in 2004. The newsletter is published as part of my economic consulting services. — John Williams
Views: 2783 Crush The Street
Does Fractional Reserve Banking Endanger the Economy? A Debate
 
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Two free market economists debate a topic that has long divided libertarians: The standard banking practice of keeping only a portion of depositors' money on hand and loaning out the rest. _____ Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://youtube.com/reasontv Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Reason.Magazine/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/reason Subscribe to our podcast at iTunes: https://goo.gl/az3a7a Reason is the planet's leading source of news, politics, and culture from a libertarian perspective. Go to reason.com for a point of view you won't get from legacy media and old left-right opinion magazines. _____ On April 16, 2018, two free market economists debated a topic that has long divided libertarians. Fractional reserve banking refers to banks' standard practice of keeping only a portion of their depositors' money on hand and loaning out the rest. In The Mystery of Banking (1983), the anarcho-capitalist economist Murray Rothbard called fractional reserve banking "a shell game, a Ponzi scheme, a fraud in which fake warehouse receipts are issued and circulate as equivalent to the cash supposedly represented by the receipts." Other libertarian economists, such as Larry White and Steve Horwitz, have argued that the practice is perfectly defensible. At The Soho Forum, a debate series in New York City that is sponsored by the Reason Foundation, Robert Murphy debated George Selgin over the following resolution: "Fractional Reserve banking poses a threat to the stability of market economies." Murphy, a research assistant professor with the Free Market Institute at Texas Tech University, argued for the affirmative. He has a Ph.D. in economics from NYU has addiliations with the Institute for Energy Research, the Mises Institute, the Fraser Institute, and the Independent Institute. He has authored hundreds of articles and several books explaining economics to the layperson, including Choice: Cooperation, Enterprise, and Human Action. Selgin, who opposed the resolution, is a senior fellow and director of the Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives at the Cato Institute and professor emeritus of economics at the University of Georgia. His research covers a broad range of topics within the field of monetary economics, including monetary history, macroeconomic theory, and the history of monetary thought. He is the author of The Theory of Free Banking, Bank Deregulation and Monetary Order, Less Than Zero: The Case for a Falling Price Level in a Growing Economy, and most recently Good Money: Birmingham Button Makers, the Royal Mint, and the Beginnings of Modern Coinage. The Soho Forum runs Oxford-style debates, in which the audience votes on the resolution at the beginning and end of the event. The side that gains more ground is victorious. ​In this case, Selgin won by convincing 14 percent of the audience to switch over to his side. Produced by Todd Krainin.
Views: 12146 ReasonTV
The struggles for independence and the impact of redrawing borders | The Economist
 
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From Catalonia to Kurdistan and Quebec, many people are demanding independence. What does it take to transform a cultural identity into a nation-state? And what is the impact? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2zpWFnB The number of countries in the United Nations has grown over the decades – from 51 states in 1945 to 193 today. Many more places want to become independent. But national governments almost always oppose secession. Catalonia’s parliament declared independence from Spain in October 2017 following a referendum deemed illegal by the central authorities in Madrid. Spain dismissed the region’s government, and decreed that a fresh election should be held. Catalan politicians leading the independence movement could be jailed for decades if found guilty of rebellion and sedition. The autonomous Kurdish region in Iraq also held a recent independence referendum. It outraged the government in Baghdad and neighbouring countries, which also have Kurdish minorities. The Baghdad government claimed the independence referendum was illegal and seized back the lands Kurds had taken beyond their region. The desire for secession is nothing new. There are estimated to be more than than 8000 ethno-cultural groups in the world. With many independence movements demanding that their homelands be recognised as countries. Jean-Claude Juncker, the president of the European Commission, said that if every region had its way, the EU would become unmanageable. So who gets to form a state? There are no clear international rules. The 1933 Montevideo Convention declared that a region needs 4 things to become a state: - a permanent population - a defined territory - a government - and the capacity to enter into relations with other states. But these are only guidelines. Ideally a region would also meet other conditions, such as: - show that a clear majority have freely chosen independence - respect its own minorities - have a viable state - and settle terms with the state it leaves and its neighbours In practice, all these conditions are hard to meet. Taiwan is a modern, democratic state in all but international law. It’s an island off the south-eastern coast of China which has its own constitution, functions as an independent state, has democratically elected leaders, and was the first place in Asia to rule in favour of gay marriage. Per head it’s around three times richer than mainland China. But China regards Taiwan as a renegade province. It insists that no country can have diplomatic ties with both itself and Taiwan. Only 19 countries, plus the Vatican, officially recognise it. Somaliland is another region seeking to be recognised as a country. The semi-desert territory on the coast of the Gulf of Aden declared independence from Somalia in 1991. It has its own government, police force and currency. But no foreign government recognises it. Perhaps for good reason. To recognise Somaliland would encourage other separatists in the region. It would undermine the already-weak federal government of Somalia. And it would probably lead to war. There have only been two major changes to African borders since the 1960s and neither is a success story. Eritrea declared independence from Ethiopia in 1993. Today the country has a despotic government and its people are mired in abject poverty. In 2011 South Sudan seceded from Sudan, making it the world’s newest country. Soon after South Sudan formed civil war broke out displacing 2.2 million people. Although a ceasefire was signed in 2015, the country lies in ruins - plagued by hyper-inflation, famine and violence. Independence has a romantic ring. Many sympathise with the demand for freedom. But redrawing borders is dangerous, and often causes as many problems as it solves. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2zpaHWN Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2zpaJ0R Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2zpaKBX Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2zpaL8Z Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2zpWHMf
Views: 963369 The Economist
Adams/North - Australia's Debt Bomb
 
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I discuss the state of the Australian economy with economist John Adams. Please consider a subscription via our Patreon page to help us make more great content. https://www.patreon.com/DigitalFinanceAnalytics Links to his series of articles: Ten signs we're heading for 'economic armageddon' (Feb 2018) https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/ten-signs-were-heading-for-economic-armageddon/news-story/1b307a7dd620376d0bd8628e015cbf56 Ten myths making Australians complacent about looming 'economic armageddon' (May 2018) https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/ten-myths-making-australians-complacent-about-looming-economic-armageddon/news-story/af3d79eda0006e0f7005295a3103ec87 Six pathways to Australia's 'economic armageddon' (June 2018) https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/six-path-ways-to-australias-economic-armageddon/news-story/5f11849237d1621569e85a9f2c2a1948 How to prepare for economic Armageddon (June 2018) https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/how-to-prepare-for-economic-armageddon/news-story/08c0ab60e4184ee2d2f3e3d199a5a803
Views: 51718 Walk The World
A discussion with Pam Woodall, Asian Economics Editor of The Economist
 
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World growth, world inflation, world interest rates, wages, profits, oil prices and even house prices are all now being influenced by China, India and other developing economies Sep 14th 2006 From Economist.com source URL: http://www.economist.com/opinion/displaystory.cfm?story_id=7903598 Also from Pam Woodall: House of cards (May 29th 2003) http://www.economist.com/displayStory.cfm?Story_id=1794873
Views: 1206 vastgoedzeepbel
Rothschilds 1988 Prediction For New World Currency In 2018 Set To Rock Global Markets
 
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#LordJacobRothschild #Rothschild #JacobRothschild #currency 30 years ago Lord Jacob Rothschild predicted that a one world currency would arise in October 2018 and replace nations’ sovereign currencies. The 1988 Rothschild-owned Economist magazine said that 2018 would be the year of a new currency named ‘Phoenix. King World News reports: So what could be the events that will lead to a major disruption in currency markets and in the world economy in 2018? Learn More: https://kingworldnews.com/rothschilds-1988-prediction-for-new-world-currency-in-2018-set-to-rock-global-markets/ **Follow US** Nwo Report: http://www.nworeport.me Twitter: https://twitter.com/NwoReport Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Nwo-Report-1505570316361450/
Views: 16521 Qronos16
Videographic: Grade inflation at Ivy League universities
 
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All shall have prizes: An animated infographic showing grade inflation at Ivy League universities. All shall have prizes. Grade inflation at Ivy League universities. Sixty-five years ago the average grade at Harvard was around a C. Today it’s about an A. The same holds true at Yale. And at Dartmouth. Across America’s Ivy League, the data is patchy but the trend is unmissible. Grade point averages have risen -- steeply at first, and then gently. Certainly student quality has improved: the Ivies are no longer gentlemen’s clubs for rich dunderheads. But standards also seem to have loosened. Today, Brownies have it easiest, while Princetonians have to work a bit harder. Though the schools do not disclose the information, they have not contested it either. Maybe the so-called “excellent sheep” have lackadaisical shepherds. For more video content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1vJDt98
Views: 11484 The Economist
Inflation May Be the Next Dragon to Slay - Part 1 or 5
 
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Kliesen is the author of "Inflation May Be the Next Dragon To Slay" in the January issue of The Regional Economist. Read the article at http://stlouisfed.org/publications/re/articles/?id=1865
Inflation May Be the Next Dragon to Slay - Part 4 of 5
 
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Kliesen is the author of "Inflation May Be the Next Dragon To Slay" in the January issue of The Regional Economist. Read the article at http://stlouisfed.org/publications/re/articles/?id=1865
Hyperinflation or high inflation?  Protect your assets and know the difference
 
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Hyperinflation or high inflation? What is the difference? Bill Valentine, CIO and founder of Valentine Ventures, shares his insight on the difference between hyperinflation and high inflation. Investors are always concerned about high inflation as an economic risk. Bill says if we were faced with a hyperinflation scenario, the only way to protect yourself would be to move all of your assets out of dollar denominated ones into hard assets, or switching into an entirely different currency, such as euros or yen. Hyperinflation is not 10, or 20, or even 30% inflation. None of those come close to rising to the working definition of hyperinflation. http://seekingalpha.com/article/277453-bank-reserve-levels-won-t-cause-hyperinflation The Rogue Economist of the Seeking Alpha financial website says, "Hyperinflation only ever happens when there is a general loss of faith in a currency, which results in mass flights out of it. Bank reserves have nothing to do with this phenomenon." Noted economist Philip D. Cagan wrote a treatise about hyperinflation in 1956 where he defined hyperinflation as inflation of 50% or more per month. The United States has never experienced hyperinflation but did experience high inflation of 20% during world war one and high inflation of 15% during the 1970's. But for true hyperinflation to take place in the United States, the American dollar would have to become worthless. Bill cites examples of other countries which experienced hyperinflation, such as Hungary, Yugoslavia, the Weimar Republic of Germany and Zimbabwe. http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2011-07-20/news/29795001_1_inflation-rate-indian-exports-high-inflation The Economist features a current example of the impact that high inflation can have on a country's economy. Bill Valentine, who writes the Hog Blog, shares more about what you need to know about inflation: http://www.valentineventures.com/blog/2011/07/everything-you-need-to-know-about-inflation-in-ten-charts/
Views: 1666 Valentine Ventures
Face to Face with Prof. Dr. Ravi Batra, Renowned Economist || SMU || Desiplaza || Dallas || Texas
 
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Do subscribe here : https://www.youtube.com/user/DesiplazaTV Prof. Ravi Batra interviewed at DesiPlaza Studio on Jan 08th, 2017 with the host . Dr. Ravi Batra, a professor of economics at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, is the author of five international best sellers. He was the chairperson of his department from 1977 to 1980. In October 1978, because of dozens of publications in top journals such as the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Econometrica, Journal of Economic Theory, Review of Economic Studies, among others, Batra was ranked third in a group of “superstar economists,” selected from all the American and Canadian universities by an article in the learned journal, Economic Enquiry. In 1990, the Italian prime minister awarded him a Medal of the Italian Senate for writing a book that correctly predicted the downfall of Soviet communism, fifteen years before it happened. Dr. Batra has been written up in major newspapers and magazines, such as the New YorkTimes, Washington Post, USA Today, Time, Newsweek, the U.S. News and World Report, and appeared on all major networks including CBS, NBC, CNN, ABC, CNBC, among others. In 2009, Batra received the Pratina and Navin Doshi Award for his contributions to economic analysis. Do subscribe here : https://www.youtube.com/user/DesiplazaTV ******************************************************************** 1. Desi Plaza Web Portal - http://www.desiplaza.us/ 2. DesiPlaza TV - http://www.desiplaza.tv/ 3. MastiTime radio - http://www.mastitimeradio.com 4. DesiPlaza Social media - https://www.facebook.com/desiplaza.us 5. MastiTime Social media – https://www.facebook.com/DPMastiTime 6. Texas Star Kalakaar - https://www.facebook.com/starkalakaar/ 7. Newsletter sample - http://conta.cc/1WJVgKH 8. Desiplaza YouTube channel - https://www.youtube.com/user/DesiplazaTV 9. Star Kalakaar Pinterest : https://www.pinterest.com/StarKalakaar/ 10. Star Kalakaar Twitter : https://twitter.com/dallasidol2015 11. Star Kalakaar Google + : https://plus.google.com/u/0/106138926... Tags : Southern Methodist University, chairperson, economics, American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Econometrica, Journal of Economic Theory, Review of Economic Studies, superstar economists, Economic Enquiry, Italian prime minister, Pratina and Navin Doshi Award, Irving, Dallas, telugu Filmnagar, Actress Sasha Singh, desiplazaus, mastitimeradio, starkalakaar, rsn1480AM, texas, magazines, barack obama, donald trump, economy growth, downfall in economy, hillary clinton, jallikattu, Tamilnadu, Pongal, Bull, AmendPCA, WeDoJallikattu, Irving, Dallas, USA, Lohri, Festival, India, Andhra Pradesh, Punjab, Amma, Jayalalitha, OPS, Sashikala, CM, peta, peta jallikattu, jallikattu news, tamilnadu, panneerselvam, marina beach, protests, bull taming sport, prime minister of india, narendra modi, madras high court, celebrities support to jallikattu, peta of india, cruelty to animals, government of tamilnadu, animal welfare board of india, district collectors, ministry of enviroment and forests, adolescence, indigenous cattle breeds, vaadivaasal, farmers festival,
Views: 1313 Desiplaza TV USA
Inflation May Be the Next Dragon to Slay - Part 3 of 5
 
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Kliesen is the author of "Inflation May Be the Next Dragon To Slay" in the January issue of The Regional Economist. Read the article at http://stlouisfed.org/publications/re/articles/?id=1865
MMT vs. Austrian School Debate
 
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MODERN MONETARY THEORY VS. THE AUSTRIAN SCHOOL: MACROECONOMIC DEBATES AMONG THE HETERODOXY For discussion on this video, see here: http://www.modernmoneynetwork.org/1/post/2013/08/mmt-vs-austrian-debate-post-mortem.html A public debate on macroeconomic theory and policy with leading thinkers from Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) and the Austrian School. Warren Mosler represents MMT, Robert Murphy, Ph.D, represents the Austrian School, and John Carney moderates. http://www.modernmoneynetwork.org/mmt-vs-austrian-school.html DEBATERS WARREN MOSLER is an early developer of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), the President of Valance Co, Inc., and Senior Financial Advisor to Senator Ronald E. Russell, President of the 29th Legislature of the U.S. Virgin Islands. He is the founder and current manager of the III Funds, which peaked at over $5 billion AUM in 2007 and currently manages about $1.5 billion, as well as the Founder and President of Mosler Automotive, which manufactures the MT900 sports car in Riviera Beach, Florida. Mr. Mosler has written a number of academic papers on issues relating to macroeconomics and monetary policy, and is the author of Seven Deadly Innocent Frauds of Economic Policy (2010). He maintains a personal blog, The Center of the Universe (http://moslereconomics.com), and can be followed on Twitter at http://moslereconomics.com. ROBERT MURPHY, Ph.D, is a Senior Economist with the Institute for Energy Research and an Associated Scholar at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, where he teaches at the Mises Academy. He is also an adjunct scholar at the Mackinac Center for Public Policy. From 2003 until 2006, Murphy was Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics at Hillsdale College in Michigan, U.S. From 2006 until early 2007, he was employed as a research and portfolio analyst with Laffer Associates, an economic and investment consultancy in New York. He runs the blog Free Advice (http://consultingbyrpm.com/blog) and writes a column for Townhall.com and has also written for LewRockwell.com. He is the author of a number of books including The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism and Lessons for the Young Economist. MODERATOR JOHN CARNEY is a senior editor at CNBC.com, covering Wall Street, hedge funds, financial regulation and other business news. Prior to joining CNBC.com, Carney was the editor of Business Insider's Clusterstock.com and DealBreaker.com. He has also written for The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The New York Sun, Page Six Magazine, Gawker, TheAtlantic.com, The Daily Beast, Time Out New York, Fortune and New York magazine. Carney practiced corporate law at firms such as Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom and Latham & Watkins, primarily representing banks, hedge funds and private equity firms. He received his law degree from the University of Pennsylvania.
Views: 103629 ModernMoneyNetwork
The Fisher Effect
 
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This video introduces the Fisher effect, which shows the relationship between changes in inflation and changes in interest rates in response to a change in the money supply. For more information and a complete listing of videos and online articles by topic or textbook chapter, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/economics-classroom/ For t-shirts and other EDIWM items, see http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com/merch/ By Jodi Beggs - Economists Do It With Models http://www.economistsdoitwithmodels.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/economistsdoitwithmodels Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jodiecongirl Tumblr: http://economistsdoitwithmodels.tumblr.com
Views: 97777 jodiecongirl
Fiscal Policy and Stimulus: Crash Course Economics #8
 
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In which Jacob and Adriene teach you about the evils of fiscal policy and stimulus. Well, maybe the policies aren't evil, but there is an evil lair involved. In this episode we learn how government use taxes and spending influence the economy. Sometimes the government gives, and sometimes it takes. And the giving and the taking can have a profound effect on how economies behave. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark , Elliot Beter, Moritz Schmidt, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Jacob Ash, Jessica Wode, Today I Found Out, Christy Huddleston, James Craver, Chris Peters, SR Foxley, Steve Marshall, Simun Niclasen, Eric Kitchen, Robert Kunz, Avi Yashchin, Jason A Saslow, Jan Schmid, Daniel Baulig, Christian , Anna-Ester Volozh Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 908538 CrashCourse
The battle for Venezuela's future | The Economist
 
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Venezuela is on the brink. Last week Juan Guaidó proclaimed himself Venezuela's interim president. Nicolás Maduro, the country's despotic leader, clings on to power. How should the world help Venezuela? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy On our cover this week Venezuela's at the brink. A tenth of the population have fled, partly because they're starving, medicines are running out, inflation is an estimated 1.7 million percent, The election last year was such a fast for the opposition boycotted it. Either the despot Nicolás Maduro falls or he doesn't - in which case expect matters to get a lot worse in Latin America's worst governed country. Last week Jaun Guaidó, the leader of the National Assembly in Venezuela, declared himself interim president pending elections. Immediately Mr. Guaidó was recognized by all the important democracies in the Americas apart from Mexico, Canada, the United States, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia. As we're going to press, hundreds of thousands of Venezuelans are pouring onto the streets demanding that Maduro step down. He's wrecked the country, he's wrecked the economy, he's tortured his opponents, and at least 80% of Venezuelans are heartily sick of him and want him to stand down. The government has always depended on the Armed Forces and on armed vigilante gangs to put down opposition with force and often considerable bloodshed - but it's running out of money to pay the men in uniform. A major in the National Guard only makes the equivalent of $15 a month - they've eat out their salaries by being allowed to steal money or dominate businesses. There's even a general in charge of toilet paper distribution. The United States ratcheted up the pressure this week by saying that any oil that Venezuela sells to the United States, the money will go to the legitimate government i.e. the one controlled by Juan Guaidó rather than Maduro's government. That's a huge deal for Venezuela that's the source of almost all its exports and it's very difficult to sell Venezuelan crude oil anywhere else. By putting these sanctions on Venezuelan oil the American government is hoping to starve the Maduro regime of the funds it needs to oppress it's people. Complicating matters is what one might call the axis of despots - particularly Russia. Vladimir Putin doesn't like to see autocrats fall and does like to cause trouble in America's backyard. It's been reported that a group of Russian mercenaries have been sent to protect Nicolás Maduro. Whether that will be enough to protect a regime that has almost no friends at home, and very few abroad, remains to be seen. We think the world should recognize Juan Guaidó as the legitimate president of Venezuela because he is, and offer Nicolas Maduro safe passage out of the country - perhaps to a comfortable retirement in Cuba. Once it's no longer run by an incompetent tyrant the prospects for Venezuela are actually rather good. Within living memory it's been a sophisticated liberal middle-class democracy. The knowledge of how to build such a society is still there in Venezuela and they could rebuild it again very quickly. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 76651 The Economist
Principles of economics, translated
 
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"Mankiw's 10 principles of economics, translated for the uninitiated", by Yoram Bauman, http://www.standupeconomist.com . Presented at the AAAS humor session, February 16, 2007. For the record, the talk contains two unattributed quotes ("9 out of 5" is adapted from a line attributed to Paul Samuelson---although apparently he said it about Wall Street indices, not macroeconomists---and "wrong about things" is paraphrased from P.J. O'Rourke's Eat the Rich) and, of course, the Einstein "simple" quote is an intentional misquote. The talk is based on a published article in Annals of Improbable Research (see http://www.improb.com/airchives/paperair/volume9/v9i2/mankiw.html ), which sponsored my talk and to which you should subscribe (http://improb.com/subscribe/ ). In the paper you can see the "constructive example" of how trade can make everyone worse off (or you can just wait 50 years to see what happens with climate change). More info and other clips on my website (http://www.standupeconomist.com ), and please sign up for my email list. (No spam I promise.)
Views: 1305665 Yoram Bauman
Analyse zum geleakten Cover des Economist Magazine 2017 [1/2]
 
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In diesem Video werde ich meine Deutung und meine Analyse zum geleakten Cover des Economist Magazine 2017 abgeben. ▼▼▼▼▼▼ BESCHREIBUNG LESEN! ▼▼▼▼▼▼ Zum Zweiten Teil: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LYPs_fUv3-U Meine Seiten: - Mein Blog: http://weckrufjhwhs.wordpress.com/ -----------------------------------------------------JESUS CHRISTUS IST DER SOHN DES LEBENDIGEN GOTTES----------------------------------------------------- ➤ Interessante Links: - (Exo-Suits) http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/artificial-intelligence/dwave-founder-new-startup-kindred-ai - (Exo-Suits) https://www.inverse.com/article/21335-kindred-a-i-wants-monkeys-in-exo-suits-commanding-robot-armies - (Haftbefehl kündigt Flugzeugabsturz an) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X48HQ_FdL_E (1:15) - (Hillary spricht vom "Spaßdefizit" und fordert "Lager für Erwachsene") https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZqSOXyUS0ds Der reichliche Segen יהוהs sei immer und überall mit euch! Seid gesegnet!
Views: 5056 Weckruf JHWHs
How Robert Mugabe wrecked Zimbabwe
 
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President Mugabe's economic mismanagement of Zimbabwe has brought the country poverty and malnutrition. After 36 years in charge, he's looking to extend his rule by 5 more years. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Robert Mugabe has ruled for 36 years, but this despot's country is on its knees. Zimbabwe is one of the poorest countries in the world. Malnutrition is common and life expectancy is poor. Mugabe's regime seized white-owned farms and gave them to cronies, destroying Zimbabwe's agricultural sector. When the money ran out he printed more creating the worst hyperinflation in history. The value of the currency plummeted, causing the cost of goods and services to skyrocket. In 2008 inflation hit 500,000,000,000% Local currency was abandoned and replaced by the US Dollar. Now Mr Mugabe has invented a new currency, the "Bond Note". His people have little confidence it will hold its value. Fearing more economic chaos will wipe out their savings many thousands have taken to the streets to show their anger. Some believe the end of his regime is in sight but Mr Mugabe has other ideas. In 2018 he plans to seek office for another 5 years. At the end of which he would be 99 years old. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films every day of the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 48503 The Economist
Nobel Prize-Winning Economist Robert Shiller Explains The Problem With Bonds Today | Money | TIME
 
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Yale economist Robert Shiller talks about low yields and inflation. Learn more here: http://time. com/money/3930290/shiller-bonds-inflation/ Subscribe to TIME ►► http://po.st/SubscribeTIME Get closer to the world of entertainment and celebrity news as TIME gives you access and insight on the people who make what you watch, read and share. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2EFFA5DB900C633F Money helps you learn how to spend and invest your money. Find advice and guidance you can count on from how to negotiate, how to save and everything in between. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNKdqS_Wccs94rMHiajrRr4W Find out more about the latest developments in science and technology as TIME’s access brings you to the ideas and people changing our world. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNIzsgcwqhT6ctKOfHfyuaL3 Let TIME show you everything you need to know about drones, autonomous cars, smart devices and the latest inventions which are shaping industries and our way of living https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2862F811BE8F5623 Stay up to date on breaking news from around the world through TIME’s trusted reporting, insight and access https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNJeIsW3A2d5Bs22Wc3PHma6 CONNECT WITH TIME Web: http://time.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TIME Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/time Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TIME/videos Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/time/?hl=en Magazine: http://time.com/magazine/ Newsletter: time.com/newsletter ABOUT TIME TIME brings unparalleled insight, access and authority to the news. A 24/7 news publication with nearly a century of experience, TIME’s coverage shapes how we understand our world. Subscribe for daily news, interviews, science, technology, politics, health, entertainment, and business updates, as well as exclusive videos from TIME’s Person of the Year, TIME 100 and more created by TIME’s acclaimed writers, producers and editors. Nobel Prize-Winning Economist Robert Shiller Explains The Problem With Bonds Today | Money | TIME https://www.youtube.com/user/TimeMagazine
Views: 2319 TIME
F.A. Hayek: Biography, Economics, Road to Serfdom, Quotes, Books, Nobel Prize (2001)
 
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Friedrich Hayek CH (German: [ˈfʁiːdʁɪç ˈaʊ̯ɡʊst ˈhaɪ̯ɛk]; 8 May 1899 – 23 March 1992), born in Austria-Hungary as Friedrich August von Hayek and frequently referred to as F. A. Hayek, was an Austrian and British economist and philosopher. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312233442/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0312233442&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=0608a1f10a8a4bb3ca7ba306ce906239 He is best known for his defence of classical liberalism. Hayek shared the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences with Gunnar Myrdal for his "pioneering work in the theory of money and economic fluctuations and ... penetrating analysis of the interdependence of economic, social and institutional phenomena".[1] Hayek was a major social theorist and political philosopher of the twentieth century,[2][3] and his account of how changing prices communicate information which enables individuals to co-ordinate their plans is widely regarded as an important achievement in economics.[4] Hayek served in World War I and said that his experience in the war and his desire to help avoid the mistakes that had led to the war led him to his career. Hayek lived in Austria, Great Britain, the United States and Germany, and became a British subject in 1938. He spent most of his academic life at the London School of Economics (LSE), the University of Chicago, and the University of Freiburg. In 1984, he was appointed a member of the Order of the Companions of Honour by Queen Elizabeth II on the advice of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher for his "services to the study of economics".[5] He was the first recipient of the Hanns Martin Schleyer Prize in 1984.[6] He also received the US Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1991 from President George H. W. Bush.[7] In 2011, his article "The Use of Knowledge in Society" was selected as one of the top 20 articles published in The American Economic Review during its first 100 years. Friedrich August von Hayek was born in Vienna to August von Hayek and Felicitas née von Juraschek. Friedrich's father, from whom he received his middle name, was also born in Vienna in 1871. He was a medical doctor employed by the municipal ministry of health, with passion in botany, in which he wrote a number of monographs. August von Hayek was also a part-time botany lecturer at the University of Vienna. Friedrich's mother was born in 1875 to a wealthy, conservative, land-owning family. As her mother died several years prior to Friedrich's birth, Felicitas gained a significant inheritance which provided as much as half of her and August's income during the early years of their marriage. Hayek was the oldest of three brothers, Heinrich (1990–69) and Erich (1904–86), who were one-and-a-half and five years younger than him.[9] His father's career as a university professor influenced Friedrich's goals later in life.[10] Both of his grandfathers, who lived long enough for Friedrich to know them, were scholars. Franz von Juraschek was a leading economist in Austria-Hungary and a close friend of Eugen Böhm von Bawerk, one of the founders of the Austrian School of Economics. Von Juraschek was a statistician and was later employed by the Austrian government. Friedrich's paternal gradfather, Gustav Edler von Hayek, taught natural sciences at the Imperial Realobergymnasium (secondary school) in Vienna. He wrote systematic works in biology, some of which are relatively well known.[11] On his mother's side, Hayek was second cousin to the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. His mother often played with Wittgenstein's sisters, and had known Ludwig well. As a result of their family relationship, Hayek became one of the first to read Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus when the book was published in its original German edition in 1921. Although Hayek met Wittgenstein on only a few occasions, Hayek said that Wittgenstein's philosophy and methods of analysis had a profound influence on his own life and thought.[12] In his later years, Hayek recalled a discussion of philosophy with Wittgenstein, when both were officers during World War I.[13] After Wittgenstein's death, Hayek had intended to write a biography of Wittgenstein and worked on collecting family materials; and he later assisted biographers of Wittgenstein.[14] At his father's suggestion, Hayek, as a teenager, read the genetic and evolutionary works of Hugo de Vries and the philosophical works of Ludwig Feuerbach.[15] In school Hayek was much taken by one instructor's lectures on Aristotle's ethics. In 1917, Hayek joined an artillery regiment in the Austro-Hungarian Army and fought on the Italian front. Much of Hayek's combat experience was spent as a spotter in an aeroplane. Hayek suffered damage to his hearing in his left ear during the war,[16] and was decorated for bravery. During this time Hayek also survived the 1918 flu pandemic. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Hayek
Views: 7516 The Film Archives
POLITICAL THEORY - John Maynard Keynes
 
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John Maynard Keynes was arguably the greatest economist of the 20th century. He discovered the idea that governments should stimulate demand during economic downturns – and was the creator of both the IMF and the World Bank. His ideas continue to underpin a lot of the modern economic system. If you like our films, take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): https://goo.gl/C92mGs Join our mailing list: http://bit.ly/2e0TQNJ Or visit us in person at our London HQ https://goo.gl/VUCcPj FURTHER READING You can read more on this and other subjects on our blog, here: https://goo.gl/4vY9Wo MORE SCHOOL OF LIFE Our website has classes, articles and products to help you think and grow: https://goo.gl/fwVUx8 Watch more films on POLITICAL THEORY in our playlist: http://bit.ly/TSOLpoliticaltheory You can submit translations and transcripts on all of our videos here: https://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UC7IcJI8PUf5Z3zKxnZvTBog&tab=2 Find out how more here: https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/6054623?hl=en-GB SOCIAL MEDIA Feel free to follow us at the links below: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theschooloflifelondon/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheSchoolOfLife Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theschooloflifelondon/ CREDITS Produced in collaboration with: Mike Booth https://www.youtube.com/somegreybloke Dr Chris Grocott http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/management/people/chris-grocott https://leicester.academia.edu/ChrisGrocott #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 436482 The School of Life
Who's Next at the Fed & What of Inflation? SchiffGold Friday Gold Wrap Podcast 10 20 17
 
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The SchiffGold Friday Gold Wrap podcast combines a succinct summary of the week’s precious metals news coupled with thoughtful analysis. In this episode, host Mike Maharrey talks about who Pres. Trump might tap to chair the Federal Reserve and explains why inflation isn't bad for gold. He also shares some news about silver, palladium, and gold output in Australia. Tune in to the Friday Gold Wrap each week for a recap of the week’s economic and political news as it relates to gold and silver, along with some insightful commentary. For more information, visit: https://schiffgold.com/news/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TIME STAMPS: 0:00:37- Talk of Trump replacing Janet Yellen 0:04:06- Recent talk about inflation heating up 0:06:10- Australian gold output 0:06:58- The palladium market 0:08:07- Other articles on SchiffGold ____________________________________________________________________ TRANSCRIPTION OF PODCAST: Welcome to the SchiffGold Friday Gold Wrap your overview of this week's precious metals news. It's Friday October 20th I'm your host Mike Maharry thanks for tuning in! Gold held above $1300 earlier this week but dipped below that key level midweek as the dollar rebounded. Continued talk of interest rate increases and speculation that Donald Trump may choose a hawkish Fed chair to replace Janet Yellen when her term expires early next year continues to create headwinds for gold and silver. Trump met with Yellen yesterday to discuss the possibility of her staying on as head of the central bank. During the presidential campaign Trump was highly critical of the current Fed chair saying she is obviously political and accusing her of quote doing what Obama wants her to do. But as he has on so many things Trump seems to have shifted positions and softened on Yellen somewhat. Could he keep her in place? The thing is you never know about Trump. He seems to relish in floating trial balloons and throwing things out there just to see how people react. A number of names have been floated for the Fed chair in recent weeks. The mix includes both dovish and hawkish contenders. Some of the names bandied about include Fed Governor Jerome Powell, Fed Governor Kevin Warsh, Stanford economist John Taylor, National Economic Council director Gary Cone and Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis President Neel Kashkari. The mainstream folks on Wall Street seem to think Fed governor Kevin Warsh will get the nod. He is considered a hawkish candidate who would likely push forward with interest rate normalization. Warsh has been critical of the Federal Reserve for continuing to pursue extraordinary quantitative easing after rescuing, his word not mine, the economy in the wake of the 2008 crash. But he would likely pursue a policy loosening bank regulations something that would likely appeal to Trump. Jim Grant has a completely different contrarian take. I like Jim a lot he tends to offer very solid analysis and he has a way of turning a phrase. During a recent CNBC interview, Grant said he thinks Trump will ultimately go the opposite direction and pick a Fed chair quote in his own image who will create a lot of quote cheap credit. Donald Trump is on record with The Wall Street Journal this past summer as saying he's a low interest rate guy. of course he is he's a real estate developer and what he wants is for the factory chimneys to smoke. He wants a great big booming economy and I think that what he did her for once is a very very easy fed. Visit our website for more information on this topic! https://schiffgold.com/friday-gold-wrap/whos-next-fed-inflation-schiffgold-friday-gold-wrap-podcast-oct-20-2017/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- JOIN SCHIFFGOLD ON OUR OTHER SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS! SchiffGold YouTube Channel (Please Subscribe): https://www.youtube.com/user/SchiffGold/ SchiffGold Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/pg/schiffgold/posts/ SchiffGold on Twitter: https://twitter.com/schiffgold SchiffGold on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/schiffgold ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Function of Profits & The Mirage of Inflation | Joseph Salerno and Jeffrey Tucker
 
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Buy the book: http://amzn.to/1M3RCqQ More Economics in One Lesson: http://vforvoluntary.com/library/1/econ/articles-videos/19/economics-in-one-lesson Recorded July/August 2008. Download all podcasts of this interview series: http://www.mediafire.com/?gis01fdvfddgc3w LUDWIG VON MISES INSTITUTE - CREATIVE COMMONS ATTRIBUTION 3.0 Music by: KEVIN MACLEOD - CREATIVE COMMONS ATTRIBUTION 3.0
Jim Rickards: the Fed is Racing to Create Inflation Before the US Economy Implodes!
 
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check us out on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/CapitalAccount Follow us @ http://twitter.com/laurenlyster http://twitter.com/coveringdelta Welcome to Capital Account. It's Federal Reserve Interest Rate Decision day! As expected, the Fed announced it will expand its bond-buying program with 45 billion dollars a month in longer-term treasury securities, after the conclusion of Operation Twist at the end of this year. In a different sort of twist, the Fed also announced it is now tying interest rate guidance to economic guide posts. The FOMC released a statement announcing that they anticipate the "exceptionally low range for the federal funds rate will be appropriate at least as long as the unemployment rate remains above 6-1/2 percent, inflation between one and two years ahead is projected to be no more than a half percentage point above the Committee's 2 percent longer-run goal, and longer-term inflation expectations continue to be well anchored." At the press conference Bernanke announced that the FOMC members would take into consideration a variety of metrics for determining inflation, but how will the Fed use this data to make its long term inflation predictions? We ask Jim Rickards of Tangent Capital Partners if this gives the FOMC more subjective leeway to ignore potential high short term price inflation. He explains that this gives the Fed the room to tell the public "inflation is what we say it is." Plus, is it better to fuel exports through dollar devaluation or innovation and investment? If you think it's the latter, unfortunately US corporations cut an estimated 175 billion dollars in investment from 2009 -- 2011. According to the Wall Street Journal, the S&P considers this cut in investment unsustainable. We talk to Jim Rickards, author of "Currency Wars," about the best way to boost exports. And yesterday's interview with MMT economist Stephanie Kelton created quite a storm amongst proponents of various economic schools, including Austrian, Neoclassical Keynesian, and Modern Monetary Theorist. Demetri gives his take on the interview with Stephanie Kelton, and why he thinks MMT has a pretty good grasp on how the monetary system works, but why the prescriptions for progress and how to "run" an economy are flawed. The interview also got the attention of a previous guest of ours, Mike Norman; Lauren and Demetri respond to him at the end of today's "Loose Change."
Views: 70442 CapitalAccount
Speculative Prices, Inflation, and Behavioral Economics
 
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Renowned behavioral economist and 2013 Nobel Laureate in Economic Sciences Robert J. Shiller delivered the inaugural Paul Volcker Lecture in Behavioral Economics on Thursday, March 19, at 4 p.m. in Maxwell Auditorium. The lecture, “Speculative Prices, Inflation, and Behavioral Economics,” was sponsored by Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs and the Center for Policy Research.
EDUCATIONAL MALPRACTICE
 
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MP3: http://www.fdrpodcasts.com/#/3826/educational-malpractice Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/stefan-molyneux/fdr-3826-educational-malpractice In learning institutions across the world, educational malpractice and grade inflation are wreaking havoc on the student population. Stefan Molyneux breaks down the unspoken biases in education and the modern fallout which will shake western civilization to it's core. Sources http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2102759/Why-boys-failing-grade-classroom-Lack-male-teachers-reason-according-new-study.html https://www.thestar.com/life/parent/2007/06/09/failure_is_not_an_option.html https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/eliminating-feminist-teacher-bias-erases-boys-falling-grades-study-finds http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/mehrnaz-bassiri/raising-standards-education_b_17130164.html http://www.foxnews.com/story/2006/08/27/study-shows-teacher-gender-affects-students-performance.html https://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2015/03/economist-explains-3 https://www.education.com/magazine/article/the-gender-gap/ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-life/11402552/Female-teachers-are-bossy.-Male-teachers-are-awesome.html http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10786081 https://www.theguardian.com/education/2010/sep/01/girls-boys-schools-gender-gap Your support is essential to Freedomain Radio, which is 100% funded by viewers like you. Please support the show by making a one time donation or signing up for a monthly recurring donation at: http://www.freedomainradio.com/donate Get more from Stefan Molyneux and Freedomain Radio including books, podcasts and other info at: http://www.freedomainradio.com
Views: 39062 Stefan Molyneux
Supply and Demand: Crash Course Economics #4
 
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In which Adriene Hill and Jacob Clifford teach you about one of the fundamental economic ideas, supply and demand. What is supply and demand? Well, you’ll have to watch the video to really understand it, but it’s kind of important for everything economically. Supply and demand sets prices, and indicates to manufacturers how much to produce. Also, it has a lot to do with strawberries. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1652086 CrashCourse
Basics Of Economics in Hindi (अर्थव्यवस्था की आधारभूत  जानकारी ) - Economics Online Lectures #2
 
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Basics Of Economics in Hindi (अर्थव्यवस्था की आधारभूत जानकारी ) - Economics Lecture #2 This is the second video of Economics lecture in Hindi, in Economics Lecture series in Hindi. These Economics lectures are helpful for Banking Awareness, General awareness and GK for IBPS, Bank PO, SSC CGL and Clerk exams. Economics in Hindi and India Economy lectures in Hindi mainly helpful for IAS exams Like CGPSC, UPSC, and State PSCs all over India. In this video, we have Explained Micro and Macro Economics as an example. ► Latest Coupons and Discount: https://www.goooffer.com ►Dc Classes Blog :- http://www.dcclasses.com/ व्यष्टि और समष्टि अर्थशास्त्र क्या है ?उदाहरण के साथ l CONCEPT OF भारतीय अर्थव्यस्था ( INDIAN ECONOMY) I भारतीय अर्थव्यस्था ( INDIAN ECONOMY) FOR SSC CGL I भारतीय अर्थव्यस्था ( INDIAN ECONOMY) FOR SSC CGL CHSL I भारतीय अर्थव्यस्था ( INDIAN ECONOMY) I SHORTCUTS & TRICKS OF भारतीय अर्थव्यस्था ( INDIAN ECONOMY) I भारतीय अर्थव्यस्था ( INDIAN ECONOMY) TRICKS BY DINESH MIGLANI SIR I PRACTICE SESSION भारतीय अर्थव्यस्था ( INDIAN ECONOMY) I PREVIOUS YEAR QUESTIONS ON भारतीय अर्थव्यस्था ( INDIAN ECONOMY) I भारतीय अर्थव्यस्था ( INDIAN ECONOMY) FOR CAT MBA. CGPSC Classes in Hindi के course की शुरुआत Basics of Economics in Hindi topic से हुई है, जिसमे हमने cgpsc में preparation के ऊपर चर्चा की है | eg. ► Economics Lecture Series - http://bit.ly/2v0Mqoa DC Classes CG is an e-learning platform for cgpsc coaching classes in Hindi online.This platform is in Chhattisgarh ( India ) to provide CGPSC Lectures and preparation videos in Hindi for CG PSC, CG Vyapam, CG Police Service and Bank PO and Cleark exams, Cg-ya pam, SSC CGL exams, RBI Grade B Exams and basic concepts for UPSC Exam Lectures. We will expand our lecture for CG and CBSC Board School Exams. ************** Like and Follow Us : ►FacebookLink:- https://www.facebook.com/dcclassescg/ ►Twitter Account:- https://twitter.com/DcclassesCG ►Google plus:- http://bit.ly/2saQ20I ► Website: https://dcclasses.com Subscribe to DC Classes CG:-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvGa... ************** CGPSC Syllabus(Page No 15 -24) Link:- http://festyy.com/qBy7SW Our Previous Lectures on Economics are:- ► Economics Lecture Series - http://bit.ly/2v0Mqoa ►Main Website of Chhattisgarh https://cgstate.gov.in TOP INDIAN CONSTITUTION BOOKS - ►M. Laxmikant (Hindi) - http://amzn.to/2veCG5X ►M. Laxmikant (English) - http://amzn.to/2wxh7SJ ►D.D Basu (Hindi) - http://amzn.to/2wxWw0l ►D.D Basu (English)-http://amzn.to/2vnGh15 ►Subhash Kasyap(Hindi) - http://amzn.to/2wxqUYI ►Subhash Kasyap (English) – http://amzn.to/2wxGP9m (2) TOP BOOKS FOR HISTORY - ►Ancient History - IN English - http://amzn.to/2wycZSq ►Medieval India by Chandra Satish - http://amzn.to/2w2HQmL In English - http://amzn.to/2wy4iaL ►Morden History of India- ►Rajiv Ahir Hindi - http://amzn.to/2wxYxd4 ►Rajiv Ahir English - http://amzn.to/2w2ZZkF ►Bipin Chandra Hindi – http://amzn.to/2wxUDRd ►Bipin Chandra IN English – http://amzn.to/2wxvK8r ►By Bipin Chandra English – http://amzn.to/2vffaWo (3)Top Books for Economics - ► Ramesh Singh in English: - http://amzn.to/2volxpC ► Ramesh Singh In Hindi:- http://amzn.to/2voJDk5 ► S.N. Lal in Hindi:-http://amzn.to/2vRlKX1 ► Datt and Sundaram in English: - http://amzn.to/2vo4Af8 ► Datt and Sundaram in Hindi:- http://amzn.to/2w39GiU NCERT (9-12) Books for Economics:- ►Class 9th in English:-http://amzn.to/2wyauPR ►Class 9th in Hindi:- http://amzn.to/2xsB75m ► Class 10th In English: - http://amzn.to/2wE8STQ ►Class 10th in Hindi:- http://amzn.to/2xsIUzX ►Class 11th in English: - http://amzn.to/2wxRgdf ►Class 11th in Hindi:- http://amzn.to/2w3mOEP ► Class 12th in English (Micro & Macro):- http://amzn.to/2vo6HzM http://amzn.to/2w38FaM ►Class 12th in (Micro & Macro):- http://amzn.to/2xs5ngC (4)Top Books for Environment:- ►Paryavaran Paristhitiki (Old Edition Hindi) - http://amzn.to/2wxVUb6 ►Environment & Ecology (English):- http://amzn.to/2xsoS8A ►Our Environment:- http://amzn.to/2xcv2KS (5)Top Books for Geography:- ► Atlas: - http://amzn.to/2vY4QoR ►Mahesh Barnwal Hindi:- http://amzn.to/2w38Oe7 ►Mahesh Barnwal (English):- http://amzn.to/2wxYcqO ►Goh Cheng Leong - http://amzn.to/2wnwLPN ►Prepared By: Rajendra Kumar Mandavi All the contents are used only for the purpose of learning and education under fair use policy.
Views: 914462 DC Classes
06 On Inflation (2)
 
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In late 2015, JW Mason and Arjun Jayadev went to speak with Axel Leijonhuvud, in retirement in Pismo Beach, to ask about his work and the intellectual paths not taken after 1968. Over a couple of days with him and his wife Earlene, they covered a broad range of topics: his early life, his fortuitous entry into economics, his re-interpretation of Keynes, his affection for Hayek and relationship with him (including his remarkable interview with Hayek in the 1970s), his engagement and interpretation of the great Swedish economist Knut Wicksell his creative analysis of capitalist instability, his growing concerns with inflation as a topic, his animus to neoclassical models of production, the current state of academic macroeconomics, the place of schools of thinking and heterodoxy in reviving economics and his ideas for the teaching of economics. Of course this is the fundamental difficulty. There is a structure of law, which is supposed to embody the concepts of fairness that this society adheres to. And now you’re debating which way you are going to violate that and what is fair or unfair about that. So there aren’t going to be very clear answers. Reading Axel’s work has provided, for us, a thunderclap of clarity on several issues. We hope that the same is true for you as you engage with the mind and work of this true, great, original master of economics. For those interested in engaging more deeply with his work, we have created a collection of video, transcripts, and all of the articles that he has written. Many of these remain fruitful for students and scholars exploring how to move forward in economics. Learn more at: http://ineteconomics.org/ideas-papers/blog/the-road-not-taken
Alistair Darling on the world economy | The Economist
 
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A debilitating division. The former chancellor of the exchequer discusses his time in government, the state of the world economy and the need for banking reforms government british memoir book economist magazine weekly publication paper Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://econ.st/1Fsu2Vj Get more The Economist Follow us: https://twitter.com/TheEconomist Like us: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist View photos: https://instagram.com/theeconomist/ The Economist videos give authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
Views: 2031 The Economist
Electric cars will come of age in 2018 | The Economist
 
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Electric cars will come of age in 2018. For the first time they will compete in price and performance with petrol and diesel cars. But in the year ahead we will also be confronted with some uncomfortable truths about going electric. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 2018 is set to be the year the world fully embraces the electric car. We’ll see a global tipping point for drivers as electric models start competing with petrol and diesel cars head-to-head. But we’ll also be confronted with the uncomfortable truth about the impact of going electric. They've long been vaunted as the vehicle of the future but from laughing stock in the mid-1980s to rising stock today electric cars have come of age. Companies are clambering to take the lead with billions in investments and promises to make the switch, but it’s pressure from governments that's driving this push from the industry. It's an unlikely country that's leading the pack. In 2016 China brought more than 40 percent of the world's electric cars. These fume free cars will make our cities cleaner but uncomfortable truths lurk behind the electric car revolution. The rise of electric cars will challenge the world's thirst for oil. It could spark a global shift of power from countries that have enjoyed the influence that oil has bought. Beyond oil, attention will turn to lithium electric car batteries which rely on the mineral Cobalt. Two thirds of the world's cobalt comes from one country, the Democratic Republic of Congo. Demand for cobalt has doubled over the past five years and is set to triple by 2020. But the electric car revolution is coming. After 2018 there will be no turning back. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 469240 The Economist