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The dangers of hyperinflation by our cartoonist KAL | The Economist
 
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In Yugoslavia in 1993 prices rose 20% a day. In Zimbabwe in 2008, inflation reached 231,000,000%. Our cartoonist KAL looks at how hyperinflation can lead to the collapse of a country's economy. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 When the prices of goods and services rise rapidly, families and businesses suffer. But on rare occasions when rising prices skyrocket out of control the result can be catastrophic hyperinflation. Hyperinflation is generally caused by reckless governments who let their money supply grow too fast. After the first world war, German prices at one point were rising at a rate of 23,000 percent a year. This caused the country's economic system to collapse, creating a political opportunity for the Nazis. More recently in the former Yugoslavia, 1993 prices rose around 20% a day. Later, in July 2008, Zimbabwe's official inflation rate reached an astonishing 231 million percent. Typically, hyperinflation quickly leads to a loss of confidence in the country's currency. With the value of their cash diminishing, citizens pursue stable items like gold and foreign currency as safe stores of wealth. Hyperinflation might not be so bad if it were stable. People and businesses could plan for the future accounting for high, but predictable prices. However, there are no examples of stable hyperinflation. By its nature, hyperinflation is an uncontrollable and dangerous phenomenon. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films every day of the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 10305 The Economist
Inflation and Bubbles and Tulips: Crash Course Economics #7
 
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In which Adriene and Jacob teach you about how and why prices rise. Sometimes prices rise as a result of inflation, which is a pretty normal thing for economies to do. We'll talk about how across the board prices rise over time, and how economists track inflation. Bubbles are a pretty normal thing for humans to do. One item, like tulips or beanie babies or houses or tech startups experience a rapid rise in prices. This is often accompanied by speculation, a bunch of outrageous profits, and then a nasty crash when the bubble bursts. People get excited about rising prices, and next thing you know, people are trading their life savings for a tulip bulb. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark , Elliot Beter, Moritz Schmidt, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Jacob Ash, Jessica Wode, Today I Found Out, Christy Huddleston, James Craver, Chris Peters, SR Foxley, Steve Marshall, Simun Niclasen, Eric Kitchen, Robert Kunz, Avi Yashchin, Jason A Saslow, Jan Schmid, Daniel Baulig, Christian , Anna-Ester Volozh -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 820434 CrashCourse
TWL #6: Big Mac Economics
 
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Big Macs: delicious (kinda), cheap (kinda), and educational (absolutely). In this episode, we look at how the economist magazine used burger prices to teach about purchasing power parity. If you enjoyed this video, please consider sharing on Reddit, Twitter, Facebook, etc. For a small channel like this, all exposure is extremely helpful. Twitter: @WendoverPro Email: [email protected] Attributions Big Mac footage provided by https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xx447ehsS2g McDonald’s kitchen footage provided by epSos.de Select footage provided by VideoBlocks LLC Music provided Epidemic Sound Select maps provided by OpenStreetMap Select maps provided by Google Maps Select visuals provided by Wikipedia Commons Licenses available upon request Licensed under Creative Commons 3.0 or fair use guidelines
Views: 1206764 Wendover Productions
The collapse of Venezuela, explained
 
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The country is in chaos, but its leaders aren't going anywhere. Correction at 1:58: It’s been brought to our notice that the Supreme Court tried to strip the country’s National Assembly of its powers in March 2017 and not 2016. We regret the error. For more on the Supreme Court ruling: https://www.vox.com/world/2017/5/1/15408828/venezuela-protests-maduro-parliament-supreme-court-crisis Sources: 0:56 https://tradingeconomics.com/venezuela/inflation-cpi , https://tradingeconomics.com/venezuela/consumer-price-index-cpi , http://www.imf.org/external/datamapper/[email protected]/OEMDC/ADVEC/WEOWORLD/VEN?year=2017 , https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_Venezuela#/media/File:1998_to_2013_Venezuela_Murder_Rate.png https://www.reuters.com/article/us-venezuela-economy-forex-idUSKBN1AP2LM 1:25 https://www.scribd.com/document/354981596/Datanalisis-Informe-Omnibus-Julio-2017-ODH-Consultores#from_embed (Page 22) http://www.datanalisis.com/ 1:54 https://www.wsj.com/articles/maduro-s-allies-stack-venezuelas-supreme-court-1450912005 3:27 https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=24432 3:44 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Venezuela_Poverty_Rate_1997_to_2013.png 4:00 https://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21720289-over-past-year-74-venezuelans-lost-average-87kg-weight-how 4:40 https://www.cato.org/research/troubled-currencies?tab=venezuela Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The collapse of Venezuela and President Maduro's rise to dictatorship. Venezuela was once the richest country in Latin America. It has the largest known oil reserves in the world. And its democratic government was once praised world wide. But today, Venezuela’s democratic institutions and its economy are in shambles. The country has the highest inflation in the world, making food and medicine inaccessible to most Venezuelans. Over the last four years, its GDP has fallen 35%, which is a sharper drop than the one seen during the Great Depression in the US. The country’s murder rate has surpassed that of the most dangerous cities in the world. These conditions have sparked months of protests against the president, Nicolas Maduro. And it’s easy to see why: the country has become measurably worse since his election in 2013. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 3927013 Vox
Do we live in a multiverse? | The Economist
 
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It has long been thought that our universe is all there is, but it is possible we may live in just one of many. This is the second in our six-part series on unsolved mysteries in science. Read the accompanying article: http://www.economist.com/news/science-brief/21660968-our-second-brief-scientific-mysteries-we-ask-whether-world-might-make-more-sense. Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://econ.st/1Fsu2Vj When the ancients looked into the night sky they thought the heavens revolved around the earth and mankind. over the centuries this view has changed radically. We discovered we lived on a planet orbiting a star within the solar system and the solar system was found to be part of the Milky Way galaxy. Later we learned that our universe was filled with billions of other such galaxies - but could it be that we're committing the same error as our ancestors by thinking the universe contains everything there is? Could it be that we live in a multiverse? There are a number of different theories about what the multiverse could be. One proponent of the idea of the multiverse is Dr Tegmark of MIT. Dr Tegmark suggests a four fold classification of possible types of multiverse. The first type of multiverse is just an extension of what we already know our universe expanding into infinity rather than ending at the limits of our vision. We can look back almost to the beginning of time to the edge of the observable universe, but we can see no further. So the space beyond that distance known as the Hubble radius is literally out of sight. But that doesn't mean there isn't anything there. Because the expansion of the universe has stretched space, astronomers are able to see out to a distance of about 42 billion light years. How far things extend beyond this is unknown. If they stretch to infinity there could be numerous isolated universes cut off from one another by their own Hubble radius - depending on the observers vantage point. To understand the second type of multiverse in Dr Tegmark system it is first necessary to understand how the universe was formed and the theory of inflation. It was first conceived of by Alan Guth in 1979 and then later refined and expanded upon by Andrei Linde who had some key insights. This is one of the ideas of string theory which attempts to unify general relativity with quantum mechanics. The thinking is that all of the solutions produced by string theory that don't match up with what we can see in our own universe, may actually represent reality in other universes. The anthropic principle is the idea that our universe is fine-tuned to allow humans to live. A small fiddle with the strength of gravity for example and life as we know it would not exist - a coincidence that does not sit easily with scientists. The concept of a multiverse neatly addresses this problem within the infinite number of universes that could exist we are simply living in the one we are able to. In the third type Dr Tegmark multiverse in the first the laws of physics are the same from one to another. In this type though the component universes are separated not by distance but by time. At every moment within such a multiverse all of the possible futures allowed by the uncertainties of quantum mechanics actually happen. In the many worlds theory of the multiverse the entirety of the universe acts like the quantum photon, but instead of having two potential future states, every possible outcome would be manifested so our entire universe and everything within it, including you, would be constantly undergoing multiple visions into daughter universes - each with its own reality and future. Any given observer though would only see one outcome. In the final classification, the level 4 multiverse, Dr Tegmark proposes that all coherent mathematical systems describe a physical reality of some sort. Those different systems are of necessity different universes. What this last idea translates to in practice is hard to conceive of - it is more the province of metaphysics than physics, but the other three types of multiverse though they push the bounds of physical theory do not overstep them. Observational data supporting the theory of inflation have convinced some scientists that a multiverse is possible - but the idea is still controversial. It may be impossible to ever directly observe the multiverse but some scientists hope to eventually gather enough data supporting the theories that predict it to one day confirm its existence. If that were to happen, like the ancients before us, we would be given a whole new perspective on how the cosmos works and on our place in it. Get more The Economist Follow us: https://twitter.com/TheEconomist Like us: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist View photos: https://instagram.com/theeconomist/ The Economist videos give authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
Views: 869101 The Economist
The Economist Magazine Calls For Higher Taxes on Property and Inheritance!
 
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Views: 4598 maneco64
How to prepare for the next global recession | The Economist
 
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A decade after the global recession, the world’s economy is vulnerable again. Ryan Avent, our economics columnist, considers how the next recession might happen—and what governments can do about it Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 1231856 The Economist
Econ Vids for Kids: What is Inflation?
 
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What is inflation? In this video, we examine how the expansion of a money supply can occur and the effects of inflation on an economy. http://inkwellscholars.org
Views: 83410 InkwellMedia
What a Golf Ball Can Teach Us About Money and Inflation
 
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Economist Jerry Robinson of Follow the Money Daily (http://www.ftmdaily.com) explains what inflation really is. To explain, he uses a simple illustration of a golf ball. The traditional definition that most people learn in school is that inflation is an increase in prices, but this is not accurate. Inflation is the increase in the money supply, which leads to an increase in prices. Higher prices is an effect of inflation, not what inflation is. Visit our website to learn more truth about money and economics: http://www.ftmdaily.com
Views: 1424 Follow the Money
Olivier Blanchard on fiscal policy | The Economist
 
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Olivier Blanchard on fiscal policy The chief economist of the International Monetary Fund on macroeconomics, how to set inflation rates and why Wall Street matters Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://econ.st/1Fsu2Vj Get more The Economist Follow us: https://twitter.com/TheEconomist Like us: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist View photos: https://instagram.com/theeconomist/ The Economist videos give authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
Views: 8414 The Economist
RTD News: "No Rate Hikes...We Need More Inflation" - Paul Krugman
 
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Subscribe and share the RTD news articles... Paul Krugman, City University of New York professor and Nobel Laureate, comments on Fed and Bank of Japan policies during an interview with Bloomberg's Kathleen Hays on "Bloomberg Markets."
POLITICAL THEORY - John Maynard Keynes
 
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John Maynard Keynes was arguably the greatest economist of the 20th century. He discovered the idea that governments should stimulate demand during economic downturns – and was the creator of both the IMF and the World Bank. His ideas continue to underpin a lot of the modern economic system. If you like our films, take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): https://goo.gl/C92mGs Join our mailing list: http://bit.ly/2e0TQNJ Or visit us in person at our London HQ https://goo.gl/VUCcPj FURTHER READING You can read more on this and other subjects on our blog, here: https://goo.gl/4vY9Wo MORE SCHOOL OF LIFE Our website has classes, articles and products to help you think and grow: https://goo.gl/fwVUx8 Watch more films on POLITICAL THEORY in our playlist: http://bit.ly/TSOLpoliticaltheory You can submit translations and transcripts on all of our videos here: https://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UC7IcJI8PUf5Z3zKxnZvTBog&tab=2 Find out how more here: https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/6054623?hl=en-GB SOCIAL MEDIA Feel free to follow us at the links below: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theschooloflifelondon/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheSchoolOfLife Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theschooloflifelondon/ CREDITS Produced in collaboration with: Mike Booth https://www.youtube.com/somegreybloke Dr Chris Grocott http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/management/people/chris-grocott https://leicester.academia.edu/ChrisGrocott #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 400515 The School of Life
The Economist Suggests Helicopter Money to Combat Next Recession.
 
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Views: 5909 maneco64
English Vocabulary: How to talk about the economy
 
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http://www.engvid.com Let's talk business! Today you'll learn vocabulary that will help you to read and speak about the economy. We will look at common words used to discuss economic matters, such as GDP, stagnation, fiscal, and more. These words and expressions will help you read financial news articles and follow economic reports on television and online. After the lesson, take the quiz and try to practice these words by discussing economic matters in English with your co-workers and friends. Feel free to ask me questions in the comments section on engVid. http://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-how-to-talk-about-the-economy/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson, we're going to look at business English. We're going to talk about the economy. Now, we're not going to get into too much detail. We're not going to get into economic theories, etc. What we're going to look at is some vocabulary that will help you read financial articles and newspapers, or online, or watch financial broadcasts on TV; CNN, Money Matters, etc., things like that. So, we're going to look at all these words. We're going to start with "GDP" because everything somehow relates to "GDP - gross domestic product". What is this? This is the total value, the total monetary value of goods and services produced within a country. So everything that the country produces from toilet paper to airplanes, and services from massage to heart surgery, all the money that's made from these goods and services together adds up to the GDP. So, when we're talking about GDP, we're going to refer back to this expression when we're talking about some of these other words. So, first, let's look at "fiscal". "Fiscal" basically means anything to do with money, anything to do with financial matters, especially when we're talking about taxes. Okay? So, when... The most common thing you'll hear is "fiscal year". So when we're talking about a company's fiscal year, we're talking about it's the beginning of its tax year to the end of its tax year. In some countries, everybody matches this to January to December; in other countries, you're allowed... Your fiscal year starts when you start your business, and then one year later is the end of your fiscal year. It's easier to match it to the calendar year, but... A "quarter". Now, you're going to always hear about prices, and stocks, and values going up or down over the last quarter or over the last two quarters. What is a "quarter"? It's basically three months. So if you're talking about the first quarter of the year, you're talking about January, February, March. That's your first quarter. Your next three months, second quarter. Four quarters makes one year. "Currency". I think everybody knows this word, but just in case, this is the money that is used in a country or a region. This is the monetary value that is used for exchanges, trades, investments, etc. In Canada, we use the Canadian dollar. In the U.S., they use the American dollar. Euro in Europe, etc. A "budget". A "budget" or "to budget", it can be a noun or a verb, means to make a plan on how to spend a certain amount of money. So, for example, a government has this much money that they need to spend, or they have a plan that they want to spend this much money. Now, they want to spend a million dollars. I'm being very simple, here; I'm not going to get into big numbers. They need to spend a million dollars to provide all the services that they need and to buy all the materials that they need to import, etc. If they are running on a deficit, that means that they need to spend more money than they have. They have to spend on things to bring in or to run the country, but they don't have. So if I need to spend a million dollars but I only make the revenues of the country are only $900,000, then they will run on $100,000 deficit. Okay? "Surplus" is the opposite. "Surplus" is when the government or any company, you don't have to apply this to a government, when you have more money than you need for the budget. So if I need to spend a million dollars over the next year, but I have a million and a half, then I have half a million dollar surplus, which is always a good thing. "Inflation/deflation". "Inflation" is when prices of goods and services go up, but wages stay the same. So, basically, the purchase power of the individual goes down. You have the same amount of money, but you can buy fewer things or you can hire fewer people to do to have services for you. "Deflation" is the opposite. That's when prices go down, and the value of your dollar or your currency goes up. Both situations are not good.
Speculative Prices, Inflation, and Behavioral Economics
 
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Renowned behavioral economist and 2013 Nobel Laureate in Economic Sciences Robert J. Shiller delivered the inaugural Paul Volcker Lecture in Behavioral Economics on Thursday, March 19, at 4 p.m. in Maxwell Auditorium. The lecture, “Speculative Prices, Inflation, and Behavioral Economics,” was sponsored by Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs and the Center for Policy Research.
SLP40 Vijay Boyapati - Why Credit Deflation is More Likely Than Mass Inflation
 
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Vijay Boyapati (Software Developer, Austrian Economist) joins me to discuss his 2010 article, "Why Credit Deflation Is More Likely Than Mass Inflation". Find out where economics commentators were getting it wrong immediately post the 2008 Global Financial Crisis, and ways to think about Bitcoin in the coming years. Vijay Links: Article discussed: http://libertarianpapers.org/articles/2010/lp-2-43.pdf Vijay's Twitter: https://twitter.com/@real_vijay Stephan Links: Website: www.stephanlivera.com Twitter: http://twitter.com/@stephanlivera Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/StephanLivera
Views: 58 Stephan Livera
How Do Interest Rates Affect Stocks, Inflation, Business Activities in Our Economy? (1999)
 
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William "Bill" Wolman (December 14, 1927 – December 5, 2011) was a longtime chief economist at BusinessWeek magazine, and a frequent commentator on CNBC. Journalism awards presented to Bill Wolman include the John Hancock Award, National Magazine Award, Deadline Club Award and University of Missouri Journalism Award. On CNBC, Wolman often paired with Neil Cavuto, acting as a taciturn foil to Cavutos more outspoken demeanour. Born in Montreal, Canada, Wolman attended McGill University and went on to Stanford University to complete a Ph.D. in economics before he joined the economics staff at Business Week Magazine in 1960. He was married to the economist Anne Colamosca, with whom he often collaborated. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Wolman Mark Zandi is chief economist of Moody's Analytics, where he directs economic research. He is co-founder of Economy.com, which was acquired by Moody's Analytics in 2005. Prior to founding Economy.com, Zandi was a regional economist at Chase Econometrics. Dr. Zandi’s broad research interests encompass macroeconomics, financial markets and public policy. His recent research has focused on mortgage finance reform and the determinants of mortgage foreclosure and personal bankruptcy. He has analyzed the economic impact of various tax and government spending policies and assessed the appropriate monetary policy response to bubbles in asset markets. A trusted adviser[1] to policymakers and an influential source of economic analysis for businesses, journalists and the public, Dr. Zandi frequently testifies before Congress on topics including the economic outlook, the nation’s daunting fiscal challenges, the merits of fiscal stimulus, financial regulatory reform, and foreclosure mitigation. He is often quoted in national and global publications and interviewed by major news media outlets, and is a frequent guest on CNBC,[2] NPR, Meet the Press,[3] CNN,[4] and various other national networks and news programs. Zandi is also a regular op-ed contributor to the Washington Post[5] and Philadelphia Inquirer.[6] Zandi's analysis of the impact of an economic stimulus package on the United States economy was cited by Christina Romer and Jared Bernstein in their report on President Barack Obama's proposed American Recovery and Reinvestment Plan, which became the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Zandi Kelli Arena is an American television journalist and university professor, known as a former Washington D.C. correspondent for CNN. Arena is currently the Executive Director of the Global Center for Journalism and Democracy at Sam Houston State University, and holds the Dan Rather Endowed Chair. She also does work as a freelance reporter. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelli_Arena
Views: 146 Way Back
Future of the Turkish Economy: Turkey economic outlook, growth, inflation. Futurist Speaker
 
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Video comment on the future of the Turkish economy, economic growth, inflation, by Futurist keynote speaker, Patrick Dixon - author 15 books on global trends and Chairman of Global Change Ltd - is an international inspirational lecturer, and expert, on leadership, management, supply chain, innovation, trends analysis and business strategy. He has been ranked one of the 20 most influential business thinkers alive today (Thinkers 50). For more articles and videos please visit: http://www.globalchange.com Subscribe to Patrick's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=pjvdixon Google+ https://plus.google.com/PatrickDixonFuturist LinkedIn: http://uk.linkedin.com/in/patrickdixon Twitter: https://twitter.com/patrickdixon Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drpatrickdixon
QTR & Peter Schiff on Rising Prices, Inflation and Trade Deficits | QTR Podcast Highlights
 
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This is a short highlight clip from The QTR Podcast which features Chris Irons. Guest Peter Schiff is an economist, financial broker/dealer, author, frequent guest on national news, and host of the Peter Schiff Show Podcast. Peter Schiff's YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIjuLiLHdFxYtFmWlbTGQRQ Peter Schiff's website: https://www.schiffradio.com/ QTR Podcast #57 can be found here: https://youtu.be/axyylJoZiBU Chris is not an investment adviser. Listeners should always speak to their personal financial advisers. THIS IS NOT INVESTMENT ADVICE - OPINION ONLY AND FOR JOURNALISTIC AND DISCUSSION PURPOSES All QTR Podcast content is subject to the following Disclaimer: https://quoththeravenresearch.com/disclaimerterms-of-service/ Disclosures: Chris is Long gold Links to QTR's website and social media below: QTR's Website: https://quoththeravenresearch.com for more on QTR. QTR's Twitter @QTRResearch https://twitter.com/QTRResearch?lang=en QTR's Podbean: http://quoththeraven.podbean.com/ QTR's itunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/quoth-the-raven/id1348446973?mt=2 QTR's YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxUo55-0ScpOQNdug8FCzzA QTR's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/qtrresearch/ QTR's Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/QTRResearch/ QTR's Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/QTRResearch QTR's Robinhood: http://share.robinhood.com/christi51 QTR's Seeking Alpha Articles: https://seekingalpha.com/author/quoth-the-raven#regular_articles QTR's ZeroHedge Articles: https://www.zerohedge.com/blogs/quoth%20the%20raven -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Credits: Voice Narration / Podcast by QTR Quoth the Raven aka Chris Irons Video Edited by F3ND1MUS aka Michael Fenderson If you enjoyed this video please 👍Like, 🔥Comment, & 🦄Subscribe to Chris Irons QTR Podcasts as this really helps out both the Kraken and the Raven, TY🐙❤️ **** I do not own any of the content above, but I am editing the most entertaining portions from Chris Irons' podcasts for the world to enjoy. I have permission from QTR to make these, Thank you Chris! F3ND1MUS
Views: 260 F3ND1MUS
Inflation May Be the Next Dragon to Slay - Part 1 or 5
 
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Kliesen is the author of "Inflation May Be the Next Dragon To Slay" in the January issue of The Regional Economist. Read the article at http://stlouisfed.org/publications/re/articles/?id=1865
The big debate about the future of work, explained
 
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Why economists and futurists disagree about the future of the labor market. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: https://economics.mit.edu/files/11563 https://www.aeaweb.org/full_issue.php?doi=10.1257/jep.29.3#page=33 http://voxeu.org/article/how-computer-automation-affects-occupations https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/sites/default/files/future-work-lit-review-20150428.pdf https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/sites/whitehouse.gov/files/documents/Artificial-Intelligence-Automation-Economy.PDF https://www.vox.com/2015/7/27/9038829/automation-myth https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PWX7RPG/ref=dp-kindle-redirect https://www.amazon.com/Second-Machine-Age-Prosperity-Technologies-ebook/dp/B00D97HPQI/ref=sr_1_1 https://www.amazon.com/New-Division-Labor-Computers-Creating/dp/0691124027/ref=sr_1_1? https://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/downloads/academic/The_Future_of_Employment.pdf Clips: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTlV0Y5yAww https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_luhn7TLfWU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVlhMGQgDkY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCoFKUJ_8Yo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yeyn9zzrC84 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Pq-S557XQU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WSKi8HfcxEk /// Recent advancements in artificial intelligence and robotics have commentators worrying about the coming obsolescence of the human worker. Some in Silicon Valley are even calling for a basic minimum income provided by the government for everyone, under the assumption that work will become scarce. But many economists are skeptical of these claims, because the notion that the the economy offers a fixed amount of work has been debunked time and time again over the centuries and current economic data show no signs of a productivity boom. Fortunately, we don't need to divine the future of the labor market in order to prepare for it. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 1301141 Vox
Petrodollar, Recession Fears & Inflation
 
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RTD News keeps you up to date on what's happening around the globe. Thanks for watching this important update, "Petrodollar, Recession Fears & Inflation". Visit https://www.rethinkingthedollar.com/dollarcation/ for more information on the future of the dollar. Subscribe and share the RTD news updates so others can hear and learn... News Articles here: 1. Russia, Venezuela Sign Deal on $3.15 Billion Restructuring https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-11-15/russia-venezuela-sign-deal-on-3-15-billion-debt-restructuring?utm_content=markets&utm_campaign=socialflow-organic&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&cmpid%3D=socialflow-twitter-markets 2. US dollar will lose its ‘kingpin’ status – economist Jim O’Neill https://www.rt.com/business/409904-us-dollar-will-lose-dominance/ 3. How the Developments in Saudi Arabia May Foretell Collapse of Petrodollar https://sputniknews.com/analysis/201711141059085004-saudi-arabia-oil-petrodollars/ 4. How a New Inflation Measure Would Raise Taxes on the Middle Class https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-a-new-inflation-measure-raises-taxes-on-the-middle-class-1510764898 5. San Francisco housing market near bubble risk according to UBS report. Majority of Bay Area renters plan to leave http://www.doctorhousingbubble.com/san-francisco-real-estate-mania-ubs-renters-leaving/ 6. Central Bank Group Think: Convince the Public More Inflation is Coming https://www.themaven.net/mishtalk/economics/central-bank-group-think-convince-the-public-more-inflation-is-coming-RLLlDOEI_UODafyUbXO2eQ 7. Latest estimate shows Senate tax plan would leave low-income households with higher tax bills https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/16/senate-tax-plan-leaves-low-income-households-with-higher-taxes-analysis.html 8. When Stocks Fall, Expect A Recession https://www.richardduncaneconomics.com/when-stocks-fall-expect-a-recession/ 9. Fed Hints During Next Recession It Will Roll Out Income Targeting, NIRP http://www.zerohedge.com/print/607425 10. Investors are fleeing junk bonds in near record numbers, a troubling signal for the stock market https://www.cnbc.com/2017/11/17/investors-are-fleeing-junk-bonds-in-near-record-numbers.html 11. Bonds And Stocks Will Crash Together In The Next Crisis (Meanwhile, Bond Yields Are Going Up) https://seekingalpha.com/article/4125845-bonds-stocks-will-crash-together-next-crisis-meanwhile-bond-yields-going 12. China's Central Bank Turns on the Taps, Stemming Slump in Bonds https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-11-16/pboc-injects-most-cash-since-january-amid-slide-in-bonds-stocks 13. Cheap ECB cash still key for euro zone economy: Draghi https://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/economy/cheap-ecb-cash-still-key-for-euro-zone-economy-draghi/article37014416/ 14. EU Preparing for the Banking Crisis https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/world-news/banking-crisis/eu-preparing-for-the-banking-crisis/ Join Rethinking the Dollar on Steemit & Twitter for more news and blog articles here: https://steemit.com/@rtd https://twitter.com/RethinkinDollar Thanks for viewing this important monetary and financial news update. If you would like to support Rethinking the Dollar channel please consider donating the cost of 4 grams of silver ($2) or more here: 1. PayPal - https://paypal.me/RTDeducation 2. Bitcoin: 1KEZqLdFbe16otiku8KJqzBN4v7MU3wmpK *********** RTD UNIVERSITY *********** A new monetary paradigm starts by visiting the RTD University website. Choose from over 30+ hours of monetary and financial interviews from experts that will help you think beyond the pending dollar demise - http://bit.ly/RTD_University
Views: 1704 Rethinking The Dollar
Rothschilds 1988 Prediction For New World Currency In 2018 Set To Rock Global Markets
 
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#LordJacobRothschild #Rothschild #JacobRothschild #currency 30 years ago Lord Jacob Rothschild predicted that a one world currency would arise in October 2018 and replace nations’ sovereign currencies. The 1988 Rothschild-owned Economist magazine said that 2018 would be the year of a new currency named ‘Phoenix. King World News reports: So what could be the events that will lead to a major disruption in currency markets and in the world economy in 2018? Learn More: https://kingworldnews.com/rothschilds-1988-prediction-for-new-world-currency-in-2018-set-to-rock-global-markets/ **Follow US** Nwo Report: http://www.nworeport.me Twitter: https://twitter.com/NwoReport Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Nwo-Report-1505570316361450/
Views: 16192 Qronos16
Five points on August inflation figures
 
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Wondering what today's drop in inflation means? ITV News​' Economics Editor, Noreena Hertz​ breaks down the figures.
Views: 357 ITV News
The struggles for independence and the impact of redrawing borders | The Economist
 
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From Catalonia to Kurdistan and Quebec, many people are demanding independence. What does it take to transform a cultural identity into a nation-state? And what is the impact? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2zpWFnB The number of countries in the United Nations has grown over the decades – from 51 states in 1945 to 193 today. Many more places want to become independent. But national governments almost always oppose secession. Catalonia’s parliament declared independence from Spain in October 2017 following a referendum deemed illegal by the central authorities in Madrid. Spain dismissed the region’s government, and decreed that a fresh election should be held. Catalan politicians leading the independence movement could be jailed for decades if found guilty of rebellion and sedition. The autonomous Kurdish region in Iraq also held a recent independence referendum. It outraged the government in Baghdad and neighbouring countries, which also have Kurdish minorities. The Baghdad government claimed the independence referendum was illegal and seized back the lands Kurds had taken beyond their region. The desire for secession is nothing new. There are estimated to be more than than 8000 ethno-cultural groups in the world. With many independence movements demanding that their homelands be recognised as countries. Jean-Claude Juncker, the president of the European Commission, said that if every region had its way, the EU would become unmanageable. So who gets to form a state? There are no clear international rules. The 1933 Montevideo Convention declared that a region needs 4 things to become a state: - a permanent population - a defined territory - a government - and the capacity to enter into relations with other states. But these are only guidelines. Ideally a region would also meet other conditions, such as: - show that a clear majority have freely chosen independence - respect its own minorities - have a viable state - and settle terms with the state it leaves and its neighbours In practice, all these conditions are hard to meet. Taiwan is a modern, democratic state in all but international law. It’s an island off the south-eastern coast of China which has its own constitution, functions as an independent state, has democratically elected leaders, and was the first place in Asia to rule in favour of gay marriage. Per head it’s around three times richer than mainland China. But China regards Taiwan as a renegade province. It insists that no country can have diplomatic ties with both itself and Taiwan. Only 19 countries, plus the Vatican, officially recognise it. Somaliland is another region seeking to be recognised as a country. The semi-desert territory on the coast of the Gulf of Aden declared independence from Somalia in 1991. It has its own government, police force and currency. But no foreign government recognises it. Perhaps for good reason. To recognise Somaliland would encourage other separatists in the region. It would undermine the already-weak federal government of Somalia. And it would probably lead to war. There have only been two major changes to African borders since the 1960s and neither is a success story. Eritrea declared independence from Ethiopia in 1993. Today the country has a despotic government and its people are mired in abject poverty. In 2011 South Sudan seceded from Sudan, making it the world’s newest country. Soon after South Sudan formed civil war broke out displacing 2.2 million people. Although a ceasefire was signed in 2015, the country lies in ruins - plagued by hyper-inflation, famine and violence. Independence has a romantic ring. Many sympathise with the demand for freedom. But redrawing borders is dangerous, and often causes as many problems as it solves. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2zpaHWN Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2zpaJ0R Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2zpaKBX Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2zpaL8Z Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2zpWHMf
Views: 876385 The Economist
Inflation May Be the Next Dragon to Slay - Part 2 of 5
 
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Kliesen is the author of "Inflation May Be the Next Dragon To Slay" in the January issue of The Regional Economist. Read the article at http://stlouisfed.org/publications/re/articles/?id=1865
What is quantitative easing? | The Economist
 
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Following the Federal Reserve's latest round of quantitative easing, The Economist's Buttonwood columnist Philip Coggan explains how easing monetary policy works Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://econ.st/1Fsu2Vj Get more The Economist Follow us: https://twitter.com/TheEconomist Like us: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist View photos: https://instagram.com/theeconomist/ The Economist videos give authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
Views: 126048 The Economist
Inflation May Be the Next Dragon to Slay - Part 5 of 5
 
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Kliesen is the author of "Inflation May Be the Next Dragon To Slay" in the January issue of The Regional Economist. Read the article at http://stlouisfed.org/publications/re/articles/?id=1865
Is Asia the dominant economic power? | The Economist
 
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Asia is regaining the economic dominance it enjoyed a millennium ago - but it still has some way to go Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://econ.st/1Fsu2Vj A thousand years ago Asia dominated the world economy, producing about two thirds of its output. Western Europe was far behind and the economy of what's now the United States barely existed. Western Europe's economy rose throughout the middle ages despite setbacks caused by plagues and conflicts. Then in the 1800s America's rise and Europe's industrial revolution combined to bring Asia's share of world GDP down sharply to just one fifth of the total by 1980. China's reforms in the 1980s boosted Asia's share of the world economy but then if you're measuring GDP using market exchange rates, its share slumped in the 1990s when the Asian economic crisis caused the regions currencies to collapse. If you now compare economies using Purchasing Power Parity, which takes into account the lower prices Asian consumers pay for goods and services on their home markets, the continents rise continues, right through the 1990s crisis. Using this more realistic way of measuring GDP Asia will produce about a third of the world's output this year. Asian countries built up their reserves of foreign currency after the 1990s crisis, especially China. This increase is often taken as a sign of Asia's growing economic clout even though its been partly reversed in recent years. Furthermore currency reserves themselves are only a few percent of the worlds total stock of the worlds financial assets. Asia's share of this broader range of assets is growing but it's still only about a fifth. The East is undoubtedly rising but its new day has barely begun. Get more The Economist Follow us: https://twitter.com/TheEconomist Like us: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist View photos: https://instagram.com/theeconomist/ The Economist videos give authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
Views: 74093 The Economist
The Economics Behind Music Festivals | The Economist
 
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Music festivals attract 32 million revellers annually around the world. That adds up to an industry worth nearly $10bn a year. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 From the mud of Glastonbury to the blockbusting headliners of Coachella, music festivals have become big business. Annually there are around 800 music festivals in the US alone. It's an industry worth nearly $10bn, attracting 32 million revellers annually, half of whom are millennials. Tickets average £200 per head in the UK, but over the last 10 years music festival ticket prices have risen way above the rate of inflation. More than $1.5bn was spent by companies sponsoring festivals in 2014. The live music industry is booming as traditional record sales flounder. Artists can command up to 90% of gross ticket receipts but bag only 10% of the net profit from recorded music. Acts such as The Flaming Lips and Damian Marley can earn up to a reported £90,000 per performance. Whereas bigger names such as Justin Beiber and Madonna can charge up to a cool million. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 17736 The Economist
Inflation May Be the Next Dragon to Slay - Part 3 of 5
 
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Kliesen is the author of "Inflation May Be the Next Dragon To Slay" in the January issue of The Regional Economist. Read the article at http://stlouisfed.org/publications/re/articles/?id=1865
A discussion with Pam Woodall, Asian Economics Editor of The Economist
 
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World growth, world inflation, world interest rates, wages, profits, oil prices and even house prices are all now being influenced by China, India and other developing economies Sep 14th 2006 From Economist.com source URL: http://www.economist.com/opinion/displaystory.cfm?story_id=7903598 Also from Pam Woodall: House of cards (May 29th 2003) http://www.economist.com/displayStory.cfm?Story_id=1794873
Views: 1192 vastgoedzeepbel
Inflation May Be the Next Dragon to Slay - Part 4 of 5
 
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Kliesen is the author of "Inflation May Be the Next Dragon To Slay" in the January issue of The Regional Economist. Read the article at http://stlouisfed.org/publications/re/articles/?id=1865
KCN 30 year prophecy of The Economist magazine
 
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Partner: BitClave - https://www.bitclave.com/en/ https://steemit.com/@kcnnews Well-known economy magazine The Economist, moved cryptocurrency issue on it’s pages almost 30 years ago. The experts commented that The Economist’s 1988 edition mentioned bitcoin, as on its cover an eagle was printed, which stands on different burning banknotes and holds a coin on which 2018 date appears. Bitcoin slowly becomes popular worldwide, especially it is often used instead of weak currencies in countries with high inflation. The cover of 1988 edition writes “Get ready for a world currency” which can mean that the cryptocurrencies will take place of national currencies and, according to the prophecy, 2018 will be an important year. Info: Bitcoingarden - https://bitcoingarden.org Coinidol - https://coinidol.com/ To add subtitles: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_p... Do you like our video?
Views: 123 KCN News
Stephanie Kelton on Anti-Doomsday Economics
 
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Subscribe to The Zero Hour with RJ Eskow for more: https://www.patreon.com/thezerohour If you liked this clip of The Zero Hour with RJ Eskow, please share it with your friends... and hit that "like" button! Some of the music bumpers featuring Lettuce, http://lettucefunk.com.
The Effects of Inflation on Morality and Society | Joseph T. Salerno
 
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Lecture presented by Joseph T. Salerno at the Instituto Juan de Mariana's "Salamanca: The Birthplace of Economic Theory" conference held in Salamanca, Spain; 21-24 October 2009. http://www.juandemariana.org Joseph T. Salerno is an economist of the Austrian School who resides in the United States. A professor at Pace University, Salerno is an active scholar in the areas of banking and monetary theory, comparative economics, and the history of economic thought. He is a senior faculty member of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, for which he frequently lectures and writes, and he serves as editor of the Institute's Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics. Related links: http://mises.org/fellow.aspx?id=17 http://mises.org/articles.aspx?AuthorId=237 http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig6/salerno1.html http://www.pace.edu/page.cfm?doc_id=5585
Views: 1440 LibertyInOurTime
Score Inflation
 
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Test scores have become unintentionally inflated and now the bubble is out to burst. Are you ready? Reference Articles: http://freakonomics.com/2012/04/23/the-inflation-of-everything/ http://www.economist.com/node/21552214
Petrodollar Perils
 
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Thanks for watching. (ᵔᴥᵔ) Nick's Twitter: https://twitter.com/nickmon1112 Nick's Website: https://nickmonroe.blog Lauren's Cryptocurrency Video: https://youtu.be/G1JtJLRuqgo My Political Website: http://brittany-pettibone.com Subscribe to my Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/ddT54P SUPPORT: Support me via PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/BrittanyPettibone Get my book, Hatred Day: http://amzn.to/2jW1nm8 SEND MAIL: PO Box 278 Post Falls, IDAHO, 83877 FOLLOW: Twitter: https://twitter.com/BrittPettibone Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brittany.a.pettibone Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brittpettibone/ Website: http://tspettibone.com SOURCES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcnhF09QN78 https://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2014/06/economist-explains-20 https://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/sanctions/Programs/Pages/iran.aspx http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2012-10-23/how-iran-evades-western-blocakde-turkey-dubai-iran-petrogold-triangle https://www.rt.com/business/403804-russian-sea-ports-ruble-settlements/ https://www.rt.com/business/389712-russia-iran-oil-goods/ https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/may/21/russia-30-year-400bn-gas-deal-china https://www.reuters.com/article/us-russia-china-gas/russia-signs-second-china-gas-deal-but-falling-prices-raise-doubts-idUSKCN0IU17K20141110 http://www.scmp.com/business/article/2117072/petroyuan-may-supplant-petrodollars-russias-oil-and-gas-replace-us http://fortune.com/2016/10/02/china-yuan-imf-currencies/ https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2017/10/11/dollar-value-drop-china-compel-saudi-arabia-trade-oil-yuan/754788001/?ref=yfp https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/08/business/energy-environment/russia-venezuela-debt.html https://www.reuters.com/article/us-venezuela-economy-inflation/venezuela-inflation-reaches-quadruple-digits-hitting-1369-percent-idUSKBN1E12UP http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2017/07/31/falling-oil-prices-caused-venezuelan-crisis-not-socialism-marxist-economist.html https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-curbs-venezuelas-access-to-debt-toughening-sanctions-1503678435 https://www.wsj.com/articles/venezuela-stops-accepting-dollars-for-oil-payments-following-u-s-sanctions-1505343161 https://www.reuters.com/article/us-venezuela-economy/enter-the-petro-venezuela-to-launch-oil-backed-cryptocurrency-idUSKBN1DX0SQ http://www.scmp.com/news/china/economy/article/2122691/beijings-bitcoin-ban-helped-china-dodge-scary-cryptocurrency
Views: 11975 Brittany Pettibone
Nobel Prize-Winning Economist Robert Shiller Explains The Problem With Bonds Today | Money | TIME
 
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Yale economist Robert Shiller talks about low yields and inflation. Learn more here: http://time. com/money/3930290/shiller-bonds-inflation/ Subscribe to TIME ►► http://po.st/SubscribeTIME Get closer to the world of entertainment and celebrity news as TIME gives you access and insight on the people who make what you watch, read and share. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2EFFA5DB900C633F Money helps you learn how to spend and invest your money. Find advice and guidance you can count on from how to negotiate, how to save and everything in between. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNKdqS_Wccs94rMHiajrRr4W Find out more about the latest developments in science and technology as TIME’s access brings you to the ideas and people changing our world. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNIzsgcwqhT6ctKOfHfyuaL3 Let TIME show you everything you need to know about drones, autonomous cars, smart devices and the latest inventions which are shaping industries and our way of living https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2862F811BE8F5623 Stay up to date on breaking news from around the world through TIME’s trusted reporting, insight and access https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNJeIsW3A2d5Bs22Wc3PHma6 CONNECT WITH TIME Web: http://time.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TIME Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/time Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TIME/videos Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/time/?hl=en Magazine: http://time.com/magazine/ Newsletter: time.com/newsletter ABOUT TIME TIME brings unparalleled insight, access and authority to the news. A 24/7 news publication with nearly a century of experience, TIME’s coverage shapes how we understand our world. Subscribe for daily news, interviews, science, technology, politics, health, entertainment, and business updates, as well as exclusive videos from TIME’s Person of the Year, TIME 100 and more created by TIME’s acclaimed writers, producers and editors. Nobel Prize-Winning Economist Robert Shiller Explains The Problem With Bonds Today | Money | TIME https://www.youtube.com/user/TimeMagazine
Views: 2289 TIME
Who Founded Monetarism?
 
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Inflation is always and monetarism[edit]. Main article monetarism an alternative to keynesian macroeconomics eventually labeled in his seminal work a monetary history of the united states, 1867 1960, which he wrote with fellow economist anna schwartz 1963, friedman argued that poor policy by u. Wikipedia wiki monetarism url? Q webcache. Monetarism is a theoretical challenge to keynesian economics that increased in importance find records by names & locations. In a monetary history of the united states 1867 1960 (1963), monetarist theory draws its roots from two almost within his history, friedman restated quantity 'founding father' monetarism is economist milton. Library of monetarist theory inflation what are the differences between and monetarism reference for businessmonetarism, other essays in financial history google books result. Monetarism wikipedia en. Encyclopedia articles monetarism the concise encyclopedia of economics. Discover your family history now! myheritage genealogy. What is monetarism? Back to basics finance & development imfeconomics monetarism new world encyclopediamonetarism facts, information, pictures. Monetarist theory investopediahistory of macroeconomic thought wikipedia. Monetarist theory investopedia. Central bank, the federal reserve, was primary cause of great depression in united states 1930s most well known monetarist would have to be one milton friedman, who wrote about his beliefs book 'a monetary history states, 1867 1960. Karl brunner, monetarist research showcase @ cmu carnegie was adam smith a or keynesian? Jstor. Monetarism is a school of thought in monetary economics that emphasizes the role friedman and anna schwartz wrote an influential book, history united states, 1867 1960, argued. Googleusercontent search. Monetarism is an economic school of thought all monetarists emphasized the undesirability combating inflation by nonmonetary means, such as a monetary history united states, 1867 1960 argue that if money supply rises faster than rate growth national income then there will be. In the book he, along with anna schwartz, argue favor of monetarism as a combat to economic impacts inflation one monetarist policy conclusion is rejection fiscal favour monetary rule. Monetarists believe that in the short term velocity (v) is fixed this because i rate at which economic history second, we have monetarist theory, was created by economist milton friedman, among others, as a criticism to what seen shortcomings of monetarism asserts monetary policy very powerful, but it should not be used result, depression economy started moving forward liberal essay highlighting and failure monetarism, advanced friedman chicago school economics its name, concentrated on role money other monetarists found useful distinguish one time many ways real founder economics, starting keynesianism follows are cial fits into view 23 sep 2015 friedman's original work, natural unemployment purely theoretical conjecture, founded an assumption described.
Views: 25 Question Bank
Milton Friedman - Inflation Is Taxation Without Legislation
 
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Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American economist who received the 1976 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his research on consumption analysis, monetary history and theory, and the complexity of stabilization policy. With George Stigler and others, Friedman was among the intellectual leaders of the second generation of Chicago price theory, a methodological movement at the University of Chicago's Department of Economics, Law School, and Graduate School of Business from the 1940s onward. Several students and young professors that were recruited or mentored by Friedman at Chicago went on to become leading economists; they include Gary Becker, Robert Fogel, Thomas Sowell, and Robert Lucas, Jr. Friedman's challenges to what he later called "naive Keynesian" theory began with his 1950s reinterpretation of the consumption function. In the 1960s, he became the main advocate opposing Keynesian government policies and described his approach (along with mainstream economics) as using "Keynesian language and apparatus" yet rejecting its "initial" conclusions. He theorized that there existed a "natural" rate of unemployment, and argued that employment above this rate would cause inflation to accelerate. He argued that the Phillips curve was, in the long run, vertical at the "natural rate" and predicted what would come to be known as stagflation. Friedman promoted an alternative macroeconomic viewpoint known as "monetarism", and argued that a steady, small expansion of the money supply was the preferred policy. His ideas concerning monetary policy, taxation, privatization, and deregulation influenced government policies, especially during the 1980s. His monetary theory influenced the Federal Reserve's response to the global financial crisis of 2007–08. Friedman was an advisor to Republican U.S. President Ronald Reagan and Conservative British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. His political philosophy extolled the virtues of a free market economic system with minimal intervention. He once stated that his role in eliminating U.S. conscription was his proudest accomplishment. In his 1962 book Capitalism and Freedom, Friedman advocated policies such as a volunteer military, freely floating exchange rates, abolition of medical licenses, a negative income tax, and school vouchers. His support for school choice led him to found the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice, later renamed EdChoice. Milton Friedman's works include many monographs, books, scholarly articles, papers, magazine columns, television programs, and lectures, and cover a broad range of economic topics and public policy issues. His books and essays have had global influence, including in former communist states. A survey of economists ranked Friedman as the second-most popular economist of the twentieth century after John Maynard Keynes, and The Economist described him as "the most influential economist of the second half of the 20th century ... possibly of all of it". https://www.xxreport.com https://www.facebook.com/xxreport/
Views: 424 XXReport
Why Capitalism Triumphs in the West and Fails Everywhere Else: Economics & Markets (2001)
 
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Hernando de Soto Polar (or Hernando de Soto; born 1941) is a Peruvian economist known for his work on the informal economy and on the importance of business and property rights. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0465016154/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0465016154&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=8bdb4e4ebd6ba6fd4cc5cd245add07d7 He is the president of the Institute for Liberty and Democracy (ILD), located in Lima, Peru. Between 1988 and 1995, he and the Institute for Liberty and Democracy (ILD) were responsible for some four hundred initiatives, laws, and regulations that changed Peru's economic system.[3] In particular, ILD designed the administrative reform of Peru's property system which has given titles to more than 1.2 million families and helped some 380,000 firms, which previously operated in the black market, to enter the formal economy.[4] This latter task was accomplished through the elimination of bureaucratic "red-tape" and of restrictive registration, licensing and permit laws, which made the opening of new businesses very time-consuming and costly. Yale University political scientist Susan C. Stokes believes that de Soto's influence helped change the policies of the recently elected Alberto Fujimori from a Keynesian to a neoliberal approach. De Soto convinced then-president Fujimori to travel to Chicago, where Fujimori met with several important figures within the International Monetary Fund, the US Department of State, and the Chinese embassy, who convinced him that he had to abide by the rules set by the international financial institutions. These policies led to a reduction in the rate of inflation.[5] The Cato Institute and The Economist magazine have argued that de Soto's policy prescriptions brought him into conflict with and eventually helped to undermine the Shining Path (Sendero Luminoso) guerrilla movement. By granting titles to small coca farmers in the two main coca-growing areas, they argued that the Shining Path was deprived of safe havens, recruits and money, and the leadership was forced to cities where they were arrested.[6][7] ILD notes a large terrorist attack on de Soto and statements by Shining Path leader Abimael Guzman who saw ILD as a serious threat.[8] After the split with Fujimori, he and his institute designed similar programs in El Salvador, Haiti, Tanzania, and Egypt and has gained favor with the World Bank, the World Bank-allied international NGO Slum Dwellers International and the government of South Africa. Time magazine chose De Soto as one of the five leading Latin American innovators of the century in its special May 1999 issue Leaders of the New Millennium, and included him among the 100 most influential people in the world in 2004.[15] De Soto was also listed as one of the 15 innovators "who will reinvent your future" according to Forbes magazine's 85th anniversary edition. In January 2000, Entwicklung und Zusammenarbeit, the German development magazine, described De Soto as one of the most important development theoreticians.[16] In October 2005, over 20,000 readers of Prospect magazine of the UK and Foreign Policy magazine of the U.S. ranked him as number 13 on the joint survey of the world's Top 100 Public Intellectuals Poll. U.S. presidents from both major parties have praised De Soto's work. Bill Clinton, for example, called him "The world's greatest living economist",[17] George H. W. Bush declared that "De Soto's prescription offers a clear and promising alternative to economic stagnation…"[18] Bush's predecessor, Ronald Reagan said, "De Soto and his colleagues have examined the only ladder for upward mobility. The free market is the other path to development and the one true path. It is the people's path… it leads somewhere. It works."[19] His work has also received praise from two United Nations secretaries general Kofi Annan – "Hernando de Soto is absolutely right, that we need to rethink how we capture economic growth and development"[20] – and Javier Pérez de Cuéllar – "A crucial contribution. A new proposal for change that is valid for the whole world." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hernando_de_Soto_Polar
Views: 6606 The Film Archives
How The Economic Machine Works by Ray Dalio
 
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Economics 101 -- "How the Economic Machine Works." Created by Ray Dalio this simple but not simplistic and easy to follow 30 minute, animated video answers the question, "How does the economy really work?" Based on Dalio's practical template for understanding the economy, which he developed over the course of his career, the video breaks down economic concepts like credit, deficits and interest rates, allowing viewers to learn the basic driving forces behind the economy, how economic policies work and why economic cycles occur. To learn more about Economic Principles visit: http://www.economicprinciples.org. [Also Available In Chinese] 经济这台机器是怎样运行的: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZbeYejg9Pk [Also Available In Russian] Как действует экономическая машина. Автор: Рэй Далио (на русском языке): http://youtu.be/8BaNOlIfMLE
Views: 6823035 Principles by Ray Dalio
The Bullion Report of 1810 and the Truth About Inflation.
 
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"The War on Gold" by Antony C. Sutton: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1939438128/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=maneco64-21&camp=1634&creative=6738&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=1939438128&linkId=b4fd667aa90d40f096e57d8a2061b5a4 Support the channel: maneco64 store: https://teespring.com/en-GB/stores/maneco64 https://www.paypal.me/maneco64 https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3730528 BITCOIN: 1AkNoKzbZXJ75BbeGkD2ekUDJQNWDrBgMA BITCOIN CASH: qzfcsu05c9ephzv8qzl7ysvn4lfclzneescfhre4r5 ETHEREUM: 0xfffd54e22263f13447032e3941729884e03f4d58 LITECOIN: LY6a8csmuQZyCsBZbLDTQMRuyLdsW9g2na DASH: XgCTCWbz3yMYZKwNH9o8eaEFt45eAUaVuZ
Views: 4814 maneco64
Economic Forecasting: How to Predict the Future
 
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http://www.patrickschwerdtfeger.com/sbi/ Patrick Schwerdtfeger discusses the impact of demographics on future economic growth for countries around the world including America, Latin America, Europe, Russia, China, Japan, India, Pakistan and the Middle East and North Africa. In particular, he looks at population growth, the age profile and net exports as a way to predict expected economic growth between 2010 and 2050. This type of analysis is extremely valuable for people interested in international business. Their interest might be motivated by business interests, international investment objectives or thought leadership around the world. Regardless how you use this information, it will allow you to literally predict the future for the economic performance of countries all around the world. Patrick Schwerdtfeger is a leading authority on global business trends, and the author of the award-winning book, Marketing Shortcuts for the Self-Employed (2011, Wiley). He is a regular speaker for Bloomberg TV and has spoken about business trends, small business marketing and the social media revolution at conferences and business events around the world. Patrick's past books include Webify Your Business: Internet Marketing Secrets for the Self-Employed (2009) and Make Yourself Useful: Marketing in the 21st Century (2008). He has been featured by the New York Times, LA Times, San Francisco Chronicle, CNN Money, Inc. Magazine, Fortune, Bloomberg Businessweek, the Associated Press, MONEY Magazine and Forbes, among others.
Views: 18663 Patrick Schwerdtfeger
If Fed continues, we'll see recession by 2020: Economist
 
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Heather Long, economics correspondent for The Washington Post, and Joe LaVorgna, chief economist with Natixis, joins 'Power Lunch' to discuss the market volatility, if the U.S. heading for a recession and the President's correspondence with the Fed. » Subscribe to CNBC: http://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: http://www.cnbc.com/ Find CNBC News on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Google+: http://cnb.cx/PlusCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: http://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC #CNBC
Views: 2363 CNBC Television
Fiscal Policy and Stimulus: Crash Course Economics #8
 
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In which Jacob and Adriene teach you about the evils of fiscal policy and stimulus. Well, maybe the policies aren't evil, but there is an evil lair involved. In this episode we learn how government use taxes and spending influence the economy. Sometimes the government gives, and sometimes it takes. And the giving and the taking can have a profound effect on how economies behave. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark , Elliot Beter, Moritz Schmidt, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Jacob Ash, Jessica Wode, Today I Found Out, Christy Huddleston, James Craver, Chris Peters, SR Foxley, Steve Marshall, Simun Niclasen, Eric Kitchen, Robert Kunz, Avi Yashchin, Jason A Saslow, Jan Schmid, Daniel Baulig, Christian , Anna-Ester Volozh Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 875018 CrashCourse
Adams/North - Australia's Debt Bomb
 
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I discuss the state of the Australian economy with economist John Adams. Please consider a subscription via our Patreon page to help us make more great content. https://www.patreon.com/DigitalFinanceAnalytics Links to his series of articles: Ten signs we're heading for 'economic armageddon' (Feb 2018) https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/ten-signs-were-heading-for-economic-armageddon/news-story/1b307a7dd620376d0bd8628e015cbf56 Ten myths making Australians complacent about looming 'economic armageddon' (May 2018) https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/ten-myths-making-australians-complacent-about-looming-economic-armageddon/news-story/af3d79eda0006e0f7005295a3103ec87 Six pathways to Australia's 'economic armageddon' (June 2018) https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/six-path-ways-to-australias-economic-armageddon/news-story/5f11849237d1621569e85a9f2c2a1948 How to prepare for economic Armageddon (June 2018) https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/how-to-prepare-for-economic-armageddon/news-story/08c0ab60e4184ee2d2f3e3d199a5a803
Views: 49526 Walk The World
A Macat Analysis of Milton Friedman's The Role of Monetary Policy Free Audiobook
 
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Get a full audiobook of your choice, legally and zero cost : http://mkdi.space/11/b01gqskqsk Format: Unabridged Written by: John Collins, Nick Broten Release date: 6/8/2016 Duration: 1 hr and 57 mins Language: English Genre: business, commerce & economy Summary: Milton Friedman's 1968 paper "The Role of Monetary Policy" changed the course of economic theory. In just 17 pages, Friedman outlined an effective government monetary policy designed to achieve the goals of broader economic strategy, namely "high employment, stable prices, and rapid growth." Friedman did not just demonstrate that monetary policy plays a vital role in broader economic stability. He also argued that economists got their monetary policy wrong in the 1950s and 1960s by misunderstanding the relationship between inflation and unemployment. In Friedman's view, previous generations of economists had no justification for believing that governments could permanently decrease unemployment by allowing inflation and vice versa. Friedman's most original contribution was to propose that this relationship between unemployment and inflation only worked in the short term. The Economist magazine described Milton Friedman as "the most influential economist of the second half of the 20th century ... Contact me for any question: [email protected]
Views: 2 Amanda Bell
Net Inflation: the Economy has Gone Nowhere - John Williams Interview
 
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The 1 Must Own Gold Stock: http://CrushTheStreet.com/gold VISIT GUEST: http://shadowstats.com Mr. Williams was born in 1949. He received an A.B. in Economics, cum laude, from Dartmouth College in 1971, and was awarded a M.B.A. from Dartmouth's Amos Tuck School of Business Administration in 1972, where he was named an Edward Tuck Scholar. During his career as a consulting economist, John has worked with individuals as well as Fortune 500 companies. Although I am known formally as Walter J. Williams, my friends call me “John.” For 30 years, I have been a private consulting economist and, out of necessity, had to become a specialist in government economic reporting. One of my early clients was a large manufacturer of commercial airplanes, who had developed an econometric model for predicting revenue passenger miles. The level of revenue passenger miles was their primary sales forecasting tool, and the model was heavily dependent on the GNP (now GDP) as reported by the Department of Commerce. Suddenly, their model stopped working, and they asked me if I could fix it. I realized the GNP numbers were faulty, corrected them for my client (official reporting was similarly revised a couple of years later) and the model worked again, at least for a while, until GNP methodological changes eventually made the underlying data worthless. That began a lengthy process of exploring the history and nature of economic reporting and in interviewing key people involved in the process from the early days of government reporting through the present. For a number of years I conducted surveys among business economists as to the quality of government statistics (the vast majority thought it was pretty bad), and my results led to front page stories in 1989 in the New York Times and Investors Daily (now Investors Business Daily), considerable coverage in the broadcast media and a joint meeting with representatives of all the government's statistical agencies. Nonetheless, the quality of government reporting has deteriorated sharply in the last couple of decades. Reporting problems have included methodological changes to economic reporting that have pushed headline economic and inflation results out of the realm of real-world or common experience. Over the decades, well in excess of 1,000 presentations have been given on the economic outlook, or on approaches to analyzing economic data, to clients—large and small—including talks with members of the business, banking, government, press, academic, brokerage and investment communities. I also have provided testimony before Congress (details here). An old friend—the late-Doug Gillespie—asked me some years back to write a series of articles on the quality of government statistics. The response to those writings (the Primer Series available at the top-center of this page) was so strong that we started ShadowStats.com (Shadow Government Statistics) in 2004. The newsletter is published as part of my economic consulting services. — John Williams
Views: 2778 Crush The Street

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