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10 Extinct Animals Scientists Are Ready to Bring Back
 
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Do you know that scientists are almost ready to bring back some species that have been long gone? A T-Rex and other dangerous creatures aren't on the VIP list, so we won't see them in the not-so-distant future. But some of our most beloved characters from the Ice Age movies can be brought back to life! Instead of using the controversial term “cloning,” scientists prefer to say “make un-extinct.” To-may-to, to-mah-to, the idea is the same. An animal that died out thousands of years ago can't be brought back to life unless it's cloned. And therein lies the problem. For successful cloning, scientists need to have almost completely undamaged animal DNA. That's why some species are more likely to be resurrected than others. Those animals that died out not so long ago are better candidates for un-extinction. They might still be preserved in museums or in permafrost that formed during the most recent ice age. TIMESTAMPS: The woolly mammoth 2:01 The saber-toothed tiger 3:00 The Moa 3:48 The ground sloth 4:27 The dodo 5:19 Woolly rhinoceros 6:12 The Irish elk 6:44 The Baiji river dolphin 7:26 The Siberian unicorn 8:05 The Neanderthal 8:55 #extinctanimals #siberianunicorn #iceage Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY: - While most of the woolly mammoths died out about 10,000 years ago, there was a population of about 500 to 1,000 of them living on Wrangel Island as recent as 1650 B.C.E. The woolly mammoth was roughly the size of an African elephant. - The saber-toothed tiger was about the size of your typical modern-day big cats. It weighed from 200 to 600 pounds and could get up to 13 feet long. The saber-toothed tiger usually had a muscular neck, bobbed tail, powerful front legs, and dagger-like teeth that protruded from the upper jaw and could grow just under a foot long! - The moa was a huge flightless bird that looked kinda like an ostrich, minus the wings. We know of about 10 members of the moa family. Some were no bigger than a turkey while others reached a height of 10 feet, making this bird the largest that has ever inhabited our planet. - Ground sloths are likely to be successfully resurrected since they were still walking the Earth about 8,000 years ago. Even better, some samples of their DNA have already been received from undamaged hairs of this animal. - The dodo became extinct just 80 years after it had been discovered. Its only known habitat was Mauritius Island, where the dodo had been living peacefully for who knows how long until the Dutch showed up in the 1590s. - Besides the woolly mammoth, there’s one more fluffy extinct creature, the woolly rhinoceros, that scientists want to bring back. This animal still lived in the Arctic snows pretty recently, about 10,000 years ago. This furry rhino is quite famous too; it often makes an appearance in ancient cave art, like in the French Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc Cave. - The Irish elk, also called the giant deer, was one more animal that didn't quite manage to survive the Ice Age. This creature mostly died out about 12,000 years ago. But researchers have discovered Irish elk fossils in Siberia that are only 7,000 to 8,000 years old. - The Baiji river dolphin went extinct in 2006, making it the first cetacean (that’s whales, dolphins, and porpoises) to die out directly due to the negative impact of human activity. It's obvious by now that since the extinction is quite recent, there’s a sea of DNA samples at hand that make resurrection pretty much a guaranteed success. - A Siberian unicorn skull discovered in Kazakhstan proved that the animal had actually disappeared just 29,000 years ago. That’s good news for people who wanna see a real unicorn someday! - Bringing the Neanderthal back would be the easiest task of them all. Scientists already have a map of its genome. It’s not a question of whether or not we can, but if we should… Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 983107 BRIGHT SIDE
5 of the Coolest Partnerships Between Animals and Bacteria
 
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This Valentine’s Day, send a little love to your bacterial buddies! Our microbes keep us healthy, but some bacteria give their animal companions superpowers, like immunity to poison, or even invisibility! Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It's called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at https://www.scishowtangents.org ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Alex Schuerch, Alex Hackman, Andrew Finley Brenan, Sam Lutfi, D.A. Noe, الخليفي سلطان, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Patrick D. Ashmore, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Chris Peters ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: Aphids https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.ento.43.1.17 http://web.uconn.edu/mcbstaff/graf/Aphids.html https://www.agric.wa.gov.au/barley/aphid-feeding-damage-cereal-crops https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2974440/ https://books.google.ca/books?id=FzBs_QgihRIC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1042/BC20070135 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S105579039790419X https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3041126/ https://www.pnas.org/content/109/20/E1230/1 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/12265071.2001.9647599 https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jgam1955/42/1/42_1_17/_article/-char/ja/ Desert woodrats https://academic.oup.com/icb/article/57/4/723/3896233?guestAccessKey=1d5fd2a3-f361-4f95-85b2-6fba5419fa2d https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ele.12329 https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1890/0012-9658(2000)081%5B2067:IDITTC%5D2.0.CO%3B2 https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2016.01165/full https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/ToxProfiles/tp85-c4.pdf https://www.jstor.org/stable/1378444?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1890/0012-9658(2000)081%5B2067:IDITTC%5D2.0.CO%3B2 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1954740 Clams https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC21444/ https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14772000.2016.1252438 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00569130 https://www.nature.com/articles/nrmicro1992 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00114-014-1165-3 http://www.whoi.edu/feature/history-hydrothermal-vents/pdf/PLonsdaleDSRv24.pdf https://bmcgenomics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2164-9-585 Blue-ringed octopus https://oceanconservancy.org/blog/2017/03/13/the-blue-ringed-octopus-small-but-deadly/ https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00391147 http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/animal-guide-blue-ringed-octopus/2177/ http://www.sfjo-lamer.org/la_mer/22-3_4/maruyama_noguchi.pdf https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166445X1830465X https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2857372/ Bobtail squid https://www.cell.com/current-biology/pdf/S0960-9822(08)01137-8.pdf https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00227-003-1285-3 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3843225/ https://www.pnas.org/content/102/8/3004.short Images: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:%E3%82%A2%E3%83%96%E3%83%A9%E3%83%A0%E3%82%B7_(17341041222).jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:2012.10.19.-25-Mannheim_Vogelstang-Blattlaeuse.jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Journal.pbio.0050126.g001.png https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:L-Tryptophan_-_L-Tryptophan.svg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Schizaphis_graminum_usda_(cropped).jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Desert_Packrat_(Neotoma_lepida)_eating_a_peanu_01.JPG https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Creosote-Bush_(4485551500).jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mojave_vista.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1st_Place_-_Spring_Storm_in_the_Great_Basin_(7186595011).jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Desert_Packrat_(Neotoma_lepida)_in_a_Century_Plant_(Agave_americana).JPG https://www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/20371479442/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Champagne_vent_white_smokers.jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Muscheln_mit_Sipho_Nahaufnahme.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bubbles_hires.jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hawaiian_Bobtail_squid.tiff https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Euprymna_scolopes,_South_shore_of_Oahu,_Hawaii.tiff
Views: 206657 SciShow
10 Extinct Animals That Shouldn't Be Brought Back
 
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Scientists these days are serious about bringing animals extinct millions of years ago back to life. They even have a list of candidates, which includes the woolly mammoth, dodo, mastodon, and Tasmanian tiger. However, the animals you’re about to see are not desirable and will not be loved by humans. Those scary monsters from the past won’t do anyone any good. TIMESTAMPS Meganeura 1:25 Phoberomys pattersoni 2:25 Dunkleosteus 3:25 Helicoprion 4:22 Deinosuchus 5:14 Gigantopithecus 6:12 Megapiranha 6:55 The Giant Short-Faced Bear 7:50 Titanoboa cerrejonensis 8:41 Megalodon 9:15 Music: Lookahead https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -Meganeura, which was actually a griffinfly, was a bit smaller than a crow and had a wingspan of about 2.3 ft. A Meganeura’s diet consisted of insects, invertebrates, and small amphibians. -Phoberomys pattersoni (also known as “guinea-zilla”) weighed 1,500 lb and was 4.9 ft tall. It’d be impossible not to scream if you saw a buffalo-like rodent charging at you. -A prehistoric cannibal. Dunkleosteus was not a part of the shark family but was an arthropod or placoderm fish. Its bite was as powerful as that of the Tyrannosaurus rex and modern crocodiles. -Helicoprion was 35 ft long with shark-like features and was twice the size of the largest known great white shark. Its tooth whorl, which consisted of 15 to 18 serrated teeth, worked like a circular saw when eating its prey. -Deinosuchus was related to the alligator and could grow up to 39 ft long. They preyed on sea turtles and dinosaurs. -Gigantopithecus, which translates to “big ape,” was a relative of orangutans. Its teeth, which were falsely branded as “dragon teeth,” were made to grind and chew plants, bamboo in particular. -Megapiranhas were 2.3 ft long and weighed 20–30 lb. The megapiranha had a bite force of 279–1,069 lb. -Around 500,000 to 2 million years ago, the giant short-faced bear was the most powerful carnivore around. Its scientific name was “Arctodus simus,” and it weighed between 2,000 and 3,500 lb. -Titanoboa cerrejonensis’ length was about 40–45 ft, and its average weight was 1.25 tons. Titanoboa looked like a boa constrictor but behaved like an anaconda. -Megalodon was the largest shark to ever live on Earth. Its teeth were 5” to 7” in height and had a bite force of 24,400–41,000 lb. #extinctanimals #seacreatres #megalodon Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1374118 BRIGHT SIDE
10 Unique Animals You Won’t Believe Exist
 
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10 strange and amazing animals that you have probably never heard of. Nature is truly full of surprises! We live in the twenty-first century, and all continents have already been discovered, all secrets of our planet revealed, all mountain peaks conquered. Just when you think you have seen it all, some new bizarre creature makes an appearance instantly restoring your faith in the impossible! TIMESTAMPS Mangalitsa Pig, a.k.a. “a pig in sheep’s clothing” 0:50 Rhinopithecus or golden snub-nosed monkey 1:33 Emperor tamarin 2:13 Patagonian Mara 3:04 Fluffy cow 3:52 Markhor Goat 4:44 Raccoon dog 5:23 Blue Footed Booby 6:25 Malayan Colugo 7:13 Venezuelan Poodle Moth 8:09 BONUS 8:56 SUMMARY - The birthplace of this curly-haired pig is Hungary where it was discovered in the mid-19th century. Due to the fleece covering this animal, it resembles a sheep, therefore, such a name! - The name of this species is roxellana, and there is a story behind it. It is believed that they were called this way after the supposedly snub-nosed courtesan of Suleiman the Magnificent (a 16th century Sultan of the Ottoman Empire). - They were called like this because of the resemblance of their mustache to that of German Emperor Wilhelm II. - Patagonia Mara is the fourth largest rodent on our planet. There are several interesting facts about them. Females often put offsprings into crèches for safety. - Fluffy cows are looked after by people whose work is to wash, dry and use products to style these animals, so they look as fluffy as they do! It is necessary to maintain them daily, and it will take months of regular grooming until they get this lovely look of kids toys. - If you see a creature which looks as if it’s trying to catch an alien radio signal from space, it’s most likely Markhor Goat. They can grow as long as 6 ft from head to tail! - If you can’t decide if you want to have a dog or a raccoon as a pet, we have just the thing for you - raccoon dog! Despite having raccoon-like markings on their fur, they are not very closely related to the North American raccoon. - Blue Footed Booby are to catch your eye if you ever visit the Galapagos Islands. They can look a bit clumsy and comical on land, but they are excellent at flying and swimming. - Colugo has a large gliding membrane (like a flying squirrel), and they can glide for long distances between trees standing far apart. - Even if the Poodle Moth may look as if it lives in Antarctica with all this fur, in fact, it comes from Venezuela, a tropical country. Its hairs don’t serve for heating. BONUS Cloud Antelope! This species lives in the clouds (that’s why such a name)! Its bright blue fur is the reflection of cloudless blue skies in the area of its habitat. Its diet consists of sun rays and candies... Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 15022309 BRIGHT SIDE
9 Incredible Science Facts You Probably Didn't Learn At School
 
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Common scientific facts you won't believe are real How well did you perform at school? Were you among the best students or in the outsiders team? It doesn't really matter, because they probably didn't teach these science facts at school. Be ready to be amazed! Timestamps: 01:49 How deep is the sea? 03:29 The journey at the speed of light 04:17 How high can we build? 06:38 What organism lives the longest? 08:38 Five places on Earth you should avoid 09:33 Marie Sklodowska Curie Breathtaking journey to the centre of the Earth - 20 m - The roots of a camel thorn - 40 m - The deepest pool in the world - 60 m - Ancient underground cities - 105 m - The deepest underground station in the world. By the way, do you know where it is located? Leave your answer in the comments down below! - 1370 m - Permafrost in Yakutia - 1642 m - The depth of lake Baikal - 4500 m - Tautona gold mine - 6700 m - Fossilized algae - 12262 m - The deepest well in the world - 70000 m - The end of the Earth's crust - 6 381 000 m - The distance to the Earth's core What organism lives the longest? Do you know the answer to this question? Leave it in the comment section below. And no, it is not a turtle :) - Mayfly only lives for a day - Flies live for approximately 17 days - Honey bees live for 4 weeks - Bed bugs (oh these creatures!) live for 6 months - Octopus lives for 3 years - Rabbits live for 12 years - Lions can live up to 20 years old - Rhinoceros live for 40 years - Elephants live for 80 years (average human life) - Japanese spider-crab lives for 100 years - Bowhead whale lives for 200 years - Torriropsis Nutricula jellyfish is the only thing on Earth that lives forever! The explosion of Supernova According to the leading scientists, two stars will collide in the constellation cygnus. As a result, a supernova will occur, and a huge amount of energy will be ejected into space. It will be brighter that the light from a majority of stars in the galaxy. The consequences will be visible to the naked eye from the earth's surface. It will take place in 2022. Subscribe to 5-Minute Crafts here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC295-Dw_tDNtZXFeAPAW6Aw?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/5min.crafts/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/5.min.crafts/
Views: 22010515 5-Minute Crafts
10 Extinct Creatures That Could Have Ruined The World
 
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Do you think that dinosaurs were kind of scary? Think again! In its time, evolution created creatures so terrifying they make dinosaurs look like cute little babies! So do you want to find out which creatures would've completely destroyed our world if they were alive today? Then let's get started! TIMESTAMPS: Liopleurodon 1:04 Arthropleura 2:15 Megalania 3:23 Dunkleosteus 4:47 Jaekelopterus 6:03 Sarcosuchus 7:03 Gorgonops 8:24 Titanoboa 9:40 Meganeuropsis 11:07 Helicoprion 12:28 #extinctanimals #extinctcreature #seacreatures Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY: - Liopleurodon was a giant marine reptile from the family of short-necked plesiosaurs. This species lived during the Callovian stage of the Middle Jurassic Period. The typical size of a Liopleurodon varied from 16 to 23 ft, but the largest reached over 33 ft. - Arthropleura lived in the territories of current northeastern North America and Scotland about 315 million years ago. The species ranged from almost one to 7 ft in length and were around 2 ft in width. Arthropleura's body was apparently composed of around 30 jointed segments covered by 2 side plates and one center plate. - Megalania is the biggest monitor lizard you can possibly imagine. The youngest of its fossils dates back to approximately 50,000 years ago. The length of the largest Megalanias reached around 23 ft with a maximum weight of 1,320–1,370 lb. They were unbelievably active hunters. - Dunkleosteus became extinct about 358–382 million years ago during the Late Devonian period. However, there wasn't just one Dunkleosteus — there were actually 10 species of it, including D. terrelli, D. denisonii, and D. magnificus. D. terrelli, the largest of them, was almost 20 ft long. Most Dunkleosteus fossils were found in North America, Poland, Belgium, and Morocco. - Jaekelopterus was a giant predatory sea scorpion Scientists confirmed that Jaekelopterus reached a size of nearly 8.5 ft, which makes it the largest arthropod ever. - Sarcosuchus, a distant relative of living crocodiles, lived about 112 million years ago. It had somewhat telescoped eyes and a long snout with 35 teeth on each side of its upper jaw and 31 teeth on each side of its lower one. - Gorgonopses lived around 260 million years ago, terrifying all the smaller species of that time. As for their size, these creatures were about 10 ft long and weighed nearly 1,000 lb. They were basically at the top of the food chain. - Titanoboa lived in the region that's now a part of northeastern Colombia, and its fossils date back to about 58–60 million years ago. Titanoboa holds the scary record for the largest snake ever discovered with a total length of nearly 48 ft and a weight of about 2,500 lb. - Meganeuropsis still continue to be the biggest insect of all time with a wing length of 13” and a body length of almost 17”. The very first fossils of Meganeuropsis were actually discovered in France back in 1880. - Helicoprion lived was around 290 million years ago, living in North America, Eastern Europe, Asia, and Australia's waters. The most distinctive feature of Helicoprion was its circular jaw. Helicoprions proved to be incredibly strong since they survived the Permian-Triassic Extinction Event that killed 90% of marine animals and around 70% of terrestrial ones. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 2547469 BRIGHT SIDE
10 Shockingly Large Creatures That Actually Exist
 
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These massive animals and creatures will give you nightmares! Subscribe to our channel: http://goo.gl/9CwQhg Compared to the size of the Earth, humans are pretty darn small. It’s just a fact of life that we already know, but we don’t necessarily “see” it until we are next to something so much bigger than us. Regardless of whether you believe in a creator, in evolution, or both, humans and animals were created to be a certain size for a reason. So when we encounter a creature that is so large that it shocks you to the core, the world definitely takes notice. When it’s an animal that is supposed to be smaller, it’s even more shocking. Scientists then desperately want to intervene and they want to know more about how this animal could have grown to such large proportions. Was it because of genetics? Nuclear waster? An anomaly in the animal kingdom? These creatures certainly prove that we still have a lot to learn about the world around us. In this video are ten shockingly large creatures that actually exist. From creatures that were meant to be small, to creatures that are out of this world in their size, we have to wonder whether or not bigger is always better? Some of these creatures were intentionally modified to grow to their incredible size while others have genetics and Mother Nature to thank! You could even consider some of these creatures as additional wonders to the world. While we would like to think that we know everything about the world around us, we have only skimmed the surface. Check out these other videos about amazing animals! 10 Biggest Sea Creatures Caught https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3ACJ5JIqgU 10 Terrifying Animals You're Glad Are Extinct https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nn6syyAaVtA Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheRichest.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheRichest_Com Instagram: http://instagram.com/therichest For more videos and articles visit: http://www.therichest.com/ For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected]
Views: 12195340 TheRichest
Who Lives In the Deepest Place On Earth?
 
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Who lives at the bottom of the Mariana trench? Scientists have finally revealed the Mariana Trench mystery. Take a look at the deepest creature ever caught there! The curiosity of human nature makes people look for secrets and mysteries far away from home, like in outer space or on other planets. Scientists have mapped only 5 percent of our planet’s seafloor. And if you’ve ever considered the ocean plain and boring, the video you’re about to watch will blow your mind. TIMESTAMPS The Mariana Trench is the deepest area 0:45 The deepest-living fish in the world 2:40 “Ethereal snailfish” 3:12 A mysterious metallic sound 3:38 Deep sea cucumber 5:50 The deep sea anglerfish 6:20 The barreleye fish 7:13 The Champagne Vent 8:05 The 4-inch amoeba 8:35 SUMMARY The Mariana Trench is the deepest area you can find on Earth. Although almost everybody has heard the name, we have shockingly little data about this dark underwater place in the western Pacific Ocean. It’s a monumental task mapping the seafloor and taking pictures when the water pressure at the bottom is more than 1,000 times greater than that at the surface! The Mariana Trench houses the deepest parts of our planet. Music: The Cave of Poetry by Savfk (https://soundcloud.com/savfk) is licensed under a Creative Commons license (https://www.youtube.com/redirect?redir_token=qrG6R2YuSdRsl9d4Dssanp-563R8MTUyMjEzNzE4NkAxNTIyMDUwNzg2&event=video_description&v=2OX0n9RiI3g&q=https%3A%2F%2Fcreativecommons.org%2Flicenses%2Fby%2F4.0%2F). Savfk YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXlppUGWeGtHBp_1xKsawmQ Location of the Mariana Trench: By I, Kmusser, CC BY 2.5 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2502266 Cut-out from original shown below: By By Masaki Miya et al. - Evolutionary history of anglerfishes (Teleostei: Lophiiformes): a mitogenomic perspective. BMC Evolutionary Biology 2010, 10:58 doi:10.1186/1471-2148- 10-58, CC BY 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=31419510 Pseudoliparis swirei (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae), hadal snailfish from the Mariana Trench: By Gerringer M. E., Linley T. D., Jamieson A. J., Goetze E., Drazen J. C. - Gerringer M. E., Linley T. D., Jamieson A. J., Goetze E., Drazen J. C. (2017). Pseudoliparis swirei sp. nov.: A newly-discovered hadal snailfish (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae) from the Mariana Trench. Zootaxa, 4358 (1):161—177. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4358.1.7, CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=64828839 Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/ Location of the Mariana Trench: By I, Kmusser, CC BY 2.5 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2502266 Deepest Depth in the Trench (Map view of the bathymetry of southern Mariana Trench area): By University of New Hampshire, http://ccom.unh.edu/theme/law-sea/mariana-trench-pacific-ocean/mariana-obliques Pseudoliparis swirei (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae), hadal snailfish from the Mariana Trench: By Gerringer M. E., Linley T. D., Jamieson A. J., Goetze E., Drazen J. C. - Gerringer M. E., Linley T. D., Jamieson A. J., Goetze E., Drazen J. C. (2017). Pseudoliparis swirei sp. nov.: A newly-discovered hadal snailfish (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae) from the Mariana Trench. Zootaxa, 4358 (1): 161—177. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4358.1.7, CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=64828839 Cut-out from original shown below: By By Masaki Miya et al. - Evolutionary history of anglerfishes (Teleostei: Lophiiformes): a mitogenomic perspective. BMC Evolutionary Biology 2010, 10:58 doi:10.1186/1471-2148-10-58, CC BY 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=31419510 Deep-sea Holothurian: By NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas, http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1605/dailyupdates/media/video/0425-holo/0425-holo.html Researchers solve mystery of deep-sea fish with tubular eyes and transparent head (The barreleye (Macropinna microstoma): By Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), https://www.mbari.org/barreleye-fish-with-tubular-eyes-and-transparent-head
Views: 4019618 BRIGHT SIDE
Scientists Finally Discovered the Truth About Easter Island
 
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We all know that the easter island heads have bodies – that’s not a mystery at all. But how did the easter island population build hundreds of statues? Scientists have recently solved this mystery and discovered where these people disappeared to and why. For many decades, people's minds have been occupied with the mystery of Easter Island. A remote piece of volcanic soil, far away in the Pacific Ocean... But our planet hosts thousands of such lonely islands, what is so particular about this one? The mystery is concealed not in the island itself but giant stone statues covering it. Who created the world-famous huge stone heads? Did they serve any specific purpose? Where did their creators arrive from and where did they disappear? Well, it seems the answer is finally just around the corner! TIMESTAMPS What do we know about Easter Island? 1:05 Amazing facts about Easter Island 2:18 How have the statues been moved around the island? 5:25 How could create Easter Island monuments? 7:24 What happened to people on Easter Island? 8:09 SUMMARY - Where is Easter Island located? Rapa Nui (which is the name given to Easter Island by its first inhabitants) is the territory of Chile and is situated in the southern Pacific Ocean. And it is so, so far that you can easily consider it one of the most distant places on the world's map. It lies 1,200 miles away from Pitcairn, which is its closest neighbor. - What's the main secret of the statues? Most statues (834 out of 887) were carved from the material called tuff which is, in fact, compressed volcanic ash. Curiously, all the statues except one group face inland. It means their backs are turned to the ocean. Perhaps the reason for that was the belief that the statues were the protectors of the villagers that's why they overlooked the settlement. The only statues not fitting into this pattern can be found at Ahu Akivi, a sacred place for the people of Rapa Nui. - Theories about how the statues had been moved. One of the most popular ones among the lovers of mysteries was the belief that the statues had been created and moved by aliens. But even if you like this theory, we are sorry to debunk it. The stone the statues were built from originates from the island itself. The birthplace of most of the material was an extinct volcano situated in the north-east of Easter Island and not another planet. - A new study about the island. A new study has been conducted recently to specify the maximum number of the inhabitants in the heyday of the island's civilization. The results arrived, and they were quite unexpected. It turned out that as many as 17 and a half thousand people could comfortably live on the island. At least 19 percent of the land could be covered with the fields of sweet potatoes that used to be the main source of food for the population. What is more, the islanders consumed quite a lot of seafood and fish. - Why did people on Easter Island disappear? At first, it was believed that the reason for such a decrease of the population was an ecocide. The natives cut out large forests and palm trees making spare room for moving the statues around as well as agriculture. They thought the trees were going to grow back fast enough. It was a misleading concept. The deterioration of the environment resulted in hunger. And this, in turn, led to wars and cannibalism. Nowadays, however, such a theory has been proven wrong. First of all, Rapa Nui inhabitants seemed to be very talented agricultural engineers. They deliberately fertilized the fields with the volcanic rock. In fact, another research has shown that people had been living on the island for many centuries. And the population only started to decrease when Europeans began visiting. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 14747224 BRIGHT SIDE
A Unique Creature on Earth That Can Never Be Killed
 
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Earth is the only planet in our solar system, our galaxy, and potentially our entire universe that sustains life. Us humans believe we’re practically indestructible, but it turns out there’s a unique creature tougher than us that can’t be killed. Meet the tardigrade, one of the most resilient animals in the world – and possibly the universe. TIMESTAMPS It’s also called the water bear. 1:18 It’s really small. 2:20 It’s really, really old. 3:08 It can live anywhere. 4:02 It’s (mostly) harmless. 5:00 It’s practically unkillable. 6:04 It survives extinction events. 10:45 It might survive on another planet. 12:33 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -A tardigrade is commonly called a water bear because it is most often found in water, where it prefers to dwell, and because of its slow gait, which resembles that of a bear. -The biggest full-grown tardigrade is about 0.5 mm or about 1/50 of an inch, which is smaller than flea and tick larva. -The earliest fossils we have of the tardigrade species date back to the Cambrian period, some 530 million years ago. -Tardigrades have been found on the high-altitude peaks of the Himalayas, in deep trenches in the ocean, in mud volcanoes, and in tropical rainforests. -These unique creatures move into a new environment and help to establish an ecosystem, not unlike a gold prospector setting up shop out in the frontier. -Many tardigrades can enter a dehydrated state to survive almost any dangerous outside environment. They curl up into a barrel shape, their bodies become glass-like, and they put themselves in stasis, during which time they’re pretty much indestructible. -The tardigrade has survived all possible extinction events, from the Ordovician-Silurian extinction 440 million years ago all the way up to the extinction events that took out the dinosaurs. -The conditions on Mars are within the tardigrades’ capabilities to survive, assuming that a sufficient amount of water exists to support them. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1323481 BRIGHT SIDE
All The Tallest And Longest Things Ever Existed on Earth
 
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You ever wonder why people, plants, and animals only reach a certain height? Most of the Earth’s inhabitants can't grow too tall because of the pull of gravity. For example, if you were to double in size, you’d become 8 times heavier, and the force of gravity would crush you. Yet some amazing lifeforms manage to find a loophole in this gravitational law, growing tall and proud. You’ll be surprised and shocked to see them. You'll see some jaw-dropping giants in the video, but the largest living thing on our planet is neither an animal nor a plant. TIMESTAMPS Plants 1:08 Redwoods - Hyperion 1:37 Australian Mountain-Ash 2:56 Animals 3:30 The Giraffe 4:06 The Blue Whale 5:05 The Lion's Mane Jellyfish 5:33 Prehistoric animals 6:27 Humans 7:19 Bonus: the largest living thing on Earth 9:24 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -The tallest life forms on our planet are trees. Trees pretty much have one goal in life: to spend all their energy on growing taller than their neighbors. -The record holder among the redwoods is a tree with its own name: Hyperion. Discovered in 2006, this guy is so massive that you can’t even see the top. -The second-place medal for the world’s tallest tree species goes to the Australian Mountain-Ash, known in the scientific community as Eucalyptus regnans. -African bush elephants often reach a shoulder height of 13 feet. -The tallest living animal on Earth is the giraffe, whose leg alone is taller than the average human. Males grow up to 18 feet, and females are a bit shorter at around 14 feet tall. -The Blue Whale can reach a length of almost 100 feet! Their hearts are as big as a car, and their tongues weigh as much as a full-grown elephant. -The Lion's Mane Jellyfish can have up to 1,200 tentacles that grow as long as 120 feet. -The tallest member of the prehistoric animal family was the Sauroposeidon. Fossil records show that its height could reach 60 feet. -Born in 1868, John Rogan he towered at 8 foot 9 inches tall. There’s also Robert Wadlow, who is still the reigning champ of the tallest people ever to have lived. His nickname was "The Giant of Illinois" and he stood at 8 foot 11 inches. -The largest living thing on our planet is neither an animal nor a plant. That gold medal goes to the honey fungus. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 966309 BRIGHT SIDE
Dinosaurs 101 | National Geographic
 
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Over a thousand dinosaur species once roamed the Earth. Learn which ones were the largest and the smallest, what dinosaurs ate and how they behaved, as well as surprising facts about their extinction. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Dinosaurs 101 | National Geographic https://youtu.be/e5BFR-E-ae0 National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 251118 National Geographic
17 Scientific Facts That Seem Too Crazy to Be True
 
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We have put together a list of the most fantastic and unbelievable scientific facts that seem too crazy to be true. This world will never stop surprising us, just take a look for yourself! Scientists have recently found that the universe tastes like raspberries and the Mona Lisa actually used to have eyebrows. The coldest place in the Universe isn’t on the Moon, where temperatures can plunge down to minus 378°F. It was recorded in a lab, where scientists in Finland managed to freeze atoms using a laser. If we could get rid of the empty space in atoms, all of humanity would fit into an apple. The biggest living organism in the world is a mushroom. Human lungs have the same surface area as a tennis court. Whether a man has a son or a daughter can often depend on what kind of siblings he has. You might have heard that a person is usually a bit taller in the morning than they are in the evening. As for the height of the Eiffel Tower, it changes depending on the weather. The cavefish can walk and climb thanks to its tetrapod-like pelvis. It uses its flippers like four-legged land animals use their limbs. your brain helps you stay fit! Assuming that the average metabolic rate during rest periods is 1,300 calories, your brain takes 260 of them! Thumbnail: Cryptotora thamicola. Cave Angel Fish in Mae Hongson, Thailand: By Chulabush Khatancharoen, CC BY 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0, https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/13026504053, https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/13026351035, https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/13026504433 Animation is created by Bright Side. Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music TIMESTAMPS The coldest place in the Universe 0:22 Humanity in an apple 1:03 The taste of the Universe 1:47 Super slippery substance 2:12 The biggest living organism 2:28 Bagel brain 2:55 Faster than a space shuttle 3:13 Lungs the size of a tennis court 3:39 Family ties 3:59 A fish that knows your face 4:19 The Eiffel Tower secret 4:33 Traces of the Big Bang 4:56 Walking fish 5:16 The secret of Mona Lisa 5:37 Chimpanzee friendship 6:15 The light bulb of a brain 6:34 Coffee affects your breast size 7:05 SUMMARY -The coldest temperature ever was recorded right here on Earth in a science lab in Finland. -If we could get rid of the empty space in atoms, all of humanity would fit into an apple. -If you could taste the universe, it would taste like a raspberry. -One of the most slippery substances in the world is the lubricant in your knees. -The biggest living organism in the world is a mushroom called Armillaria ostoyae. -A squid's brain looks like a bagel because of the way its digestive system is set up. -A flea “takes off” from the ground faster than a space shuttle. Its jumps are 3.14 inches per millisecond. -If just one person’s lungs were opened flat and put on the ground, they would completely cover an area as big as a tennis court. -Men inherit from their parents the tendency to have more daughters or more sons. -Archerfish can recognize people's faces with over 80% accuracy. -The height of the Eiffel Tower changes depending on the weather. In the summer heat, it can get 5.9 inches taller. -Part of the static noise you hear on an empty channel is a trace of the Big Bang. -The cavefish can walk and climb thanks to its tetrapod-like pelvis. -Mona Lisa used to have eyebrows and eyelashes. -Male chimpanzees have best friends because it helps decrease their stress level during conflicts. -The brain needs as much energy as a 10-watt light bulb. -Three cups of coffee a day can cause breasts to become smaller, especially if they were big to begin with. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 6521127 BRIGHT SIDE
15 Recent Science Discoveries You Wont Believe
 
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15 amazing recent discoveries in the world of science and here they are from bionic contact lenses to reanimating dinosaur dna! Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 7. New Human Species Biologists all over the world were intrigued upon hearing the 2015 discovery of a new species of human, Homo Naledi, allowing for an ever clearer picture of our ancient ancestry. The findings were unveiled deep in an underground cave in South Africa and is considered one of the greatest collection of human remains ever unearthed. So far, it is known that this species of human grew to an average height of 5 feet and had a brain no larger than an orange. The way the bones in the South African cave were arranged suggests that these human ancestors ritualistically buried their dead, giving scientists a glimpse into our cultural past. 6. Bionic Lens While still in the testing stage, the founder of Ocumetics Technology Corp may have stumbled upon a revolutionary technology that could augment the way humans perceive the world. A new bionic contact lens will give wearers an ability to see the world with stronger than 20/20 vision. Some subjects, who have already tried the lens themselves, claim that they not only see better than ever before but have identified a unique spectrum of colors unfamiliar to the unaided eye. Is this perhaps the first step in the direction of a new era of superhumans? 5. Harder Than Diamond Scientists may have recently discovered a substance harder than diamond, Q-carbon. What gives diamonds their excellent hardness are the chemical bonds that hold them together. The carbon in diamonds is held together by incredibly tight chemical bonds at the microscopic level, giving diamonds their prominent hardness. By the manipulation of carbon atoms, scientists were able to augment their chemical bonds, producing a material that is potentially 60 times harder than diamond. While this substance is still being experimented on, it is a potential prospect for the future of cheap, efficient technologies. 4. First Mammals Researchers from the University of Edinburgh have discovered an ancient species of mammals that survived the notorious extinction of the dinosaurs over 65 million years ago. The reason this find is so significant is that it gives us a glimpse at how mammals began to rule the world previously dominated by their cold-blooded counterparts. The mammal is thought to have been a plant-eater closely resembling a modern beaver. Once the dinosaurs were eliminated these beaver-like creatures began to flourish, given that they were no longer victims of dinosaur predators. Because these little guys were able to withstand the destruction that wrecked havoc on the dinosaurs, an array of mammals, including our ancestors, were finally able to leave their mark on the world. 3. Whale Gene Mapping Gene mapping is starting to look less like a theoretical nicety and more like an applied science with this new aquatic discovery. Scientists have finally discovered why Bowhead Whales are able to live to 200 years old by remapping their entire genome. By comparing the genome of Bowhead Whales with the genome of other mammals with a less impressive lifespan, scientists were able to point out marked differences. Bowhead longevity is due to its genes’ effectiveness in repairing gene deterioration, which is the cause of cancer and other ailments known to cut human life short. By further studying this animal’s genes, scientists may finally be able to restore our own faulty genetic system, substantially lengthening our lives. 2. Second Earth NASA has recently confirmed their discovery of a possible second Earth. Kepler-452b orbits its sun in what scientists call the “Goldilocks Zone,” which is the habitable region in space, not too far or close to the sun, necessary for the possibility of life to flourish. The new planet appears to have a rocky surface as well as liquid water, which is another key ingredient for life to subsist. Although not much is known about if there is life beyond Earth, it makes sense to take notice of planets similar to our own. 1. Animal Re-animation Scientists have always been intrigued by the prospect of re-animating creatures that have been extinct for many years. While bringing a dinosaur back to life would be kind of cool, bringing a Wooly Mammoth back to life would be just as cool, and that is just what scientists are trying to do. Because Wooly Mammoths and Saber-Toothed Tigers have only been extinct for tens of thousands of years, unlike the millions of years dinosaurs have been extinct, intact DNA samples are much easier to find. Scientists believe it is possible to recreate these extinct beasts by cloning them with DNA and tissue samples, which have been found, over the years, preserved in ice.
Views: 4377985 Talltanic
6 "Vegetarian" Animals that Will Give You Nightmares
 
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Some of the animals you think of as just cute grass-eating creatures might actually be more interested in chomping on your meaty bones. Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Lazarus G, Sam Lutfi, Nicholas Smith, D.A. Noe, سلطان الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Patrick D. Ashmore, Tim Curwick, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Chris Peters ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: Ruminants: https://bit.ly/2uSAjrD https://bit.ly/2LqFMjn https://bit.ly/2LEQsdQ https://bit.ly/2LA5Bx1 https://bit.ly/1ppRio1 https://bit.ly/2LU5R6W https://bit.ly/2LnyFsd https://ind.pn/2NNXRF7 https://bit.ly/2AdxC94 https://bit.ly/2LEBvs9 https://bit.ly/2LuqfiU https://bit.ly/2JYqo8v Rodents: https://bit.ly/2LqG0qJ https://bit.ly/2uTK091 https://bit.ly/2uUjOel https://bit.ly/2LrD79q https://bit.ly/2OiJE3T https://bit.ly/2OoDzmG https://bit.ly/2JXdVSy https://bit.ly/2OoE5RE https://bit.ly/2LBpFz1 https://bit.ly/2JZ51ns Lepidoptera: https://bit.ly/2LSD6Yd https://bit.ly/2uPXNh4 https://bit.ly/2LV9XeL https://bit.ly/2mKlX81 https://bit.ly/2OlDC2H https://bit.ly/2OlCmMS https://bit.ly/2Ad0sGr Duikers: https://bit.ly/2Ad0uOz https://s.si.edu/2vc0ZCK https://bit.ly/2LG2S4T https://books.google.com/books?id=F23lAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA674 https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Encyclopedia_of_Mammals.html?id=XFgVnwEACAAJ https://bit.ly/2LFiCVL https://bit.ly/2NMPnxK https://books.google.com/books/about/Duikers_of_Africa_Masters_of_the_African.html?id=JoC3AAAACAAJ https://books.google.com/books?id=x75kYjINSqUC&pg=PA317 https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Natural_History_of_Antelopes.html?id=ybchPwAACAAJ https://bit.ly/2uTKAnd Hippos: https://bit.ly/2NOaL5W https://bit.ly/2uTiLeJ https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/aje.12197 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/mam.12056 http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20160108-why-you-should-beware-a-laughing-or-yawning-hippo Primates: https://www-bcf.usc.edu/~stanford/chimphunt.html https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982208011172 https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/110679 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ajp.20634 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0009419 https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitaminb12-consumer/ https://www.nature.com/articles/195201b0 https://literatur.thuenen.de/digbib_extern/zi032009.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7354869 https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article-abstract/28/12/761/256475 https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-abstract/49/4/639/4727647 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2028.1978.tb00442.x https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1439-0310.1989.tb00754.x https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ellen_Dierenfeld/publication/265157992_Gorilla_Nutrition/links/5460b0400cf27487b451ec24.pdf
Views: 491120 SciShow
Experimenting on Animals: Inside The Monkey Lab
 
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VICE News gets rare access to Europe’s largest primate testing facility, the Biomedical Primate Research Center (BPRC) in the Netherlands, where scientists try to find cures for the worst human diseases, while claiming to provide unparalleled care for the monkeys in the hope they live the most animal friendly life before and during testing. Once selected, inside the laboratories, monkeys are shaved, anesthetized, and experimented on for research purposes. Yet the center remains controversial. Protestors gather regularly in front of its gates and there are calls in the Dutch parliament to close the site and switch to alternatives for testing on primates. But as the BPRC explains to VICE News, modern science isn't there yet. In the meantime, it still uses about 200 monkeys a year for a slew of experiments to find cures, and even replacements for primate testing in the future. Read "Europe Rejects 1.2 Million Signatory Petition to Ban Animal Testing" - http://bit.ly/1Jucdpz Watch "Poaching, Drugs, and Murder in Costa Rica: Shell Game (Full Length)" - http://bit.ly/1HrOdBc Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 1961133 VICE News
7 Unique Places That Science Has Yet to Explain
 
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Exploring outer space is awesome, but what if there are places right here on Earth that are just as incredible and jaw-dropping? Luckily for you, you live on Planet Earth, a place that holds secrets so wild and baffling that even scientists can’t always explain them! Have you ever heard about the Boiling River in the Amazon or never-ending light storm? Can you believe that there’s a place on Earth with its own ecosystem and atmosphere, similar to another planet? Maybe you wanna see dancing lights in the sky? Well, the residents of Hessdalen Valley, Norway, can enjoy them every night! The world is full of amazing things, so prepare to be amazed as you learn about 7 of the most unbelievable mysteries and phenomena. Other videos you might like: Who Lives In the Deepest Place On Earth? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sq4lbCC24js& 10 Terrifying Places Science Still Can't Explain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IvyHolI93xE 10 Strange Things Found Frozen In Ice Antarctica https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOtLCXM8Ox8& TIMESTAMPS: The Devil’s Kettle Waterfall 0:41 Stonehenge 1:53 The Hessdalen Lights 3:17 The Boiling River in the Amazon 4:23 Movile Cave 6:09 Circles of Namibia 7:30 Western Venezuela’s Never-Ending Light Storm 8:28 #funsciense #amazingplaces #mysteriousplaces Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - What’s interesting about this waterfall is that it has 2 different bodies of falling water. One side has water falling into another body of water, Lake Superior; the other one has water that falls straight into a huge natural hole in the ground. Where does this water lead? No one seems to know! - While today we have machines that can help us lift heavy materials to build giant buildings and monuments, back in the days when Stonehenge was built, no one had access to this type of technology. - In Hessdalen Valley, brightly colored lights appear in the sky in different colors and shapes. For the last 4 decades (and possibly longer!), this phenomenon has continued to puzzle scientists. - Deep in the Amazon rainforests lies a flowing river in the forested region of Mayantuyacu that boasts temperatures so hot that any person or animal that falls into it literally boils alive from the inside out. - Movile Cave, located in Southeastern Romania, remained closed in complete darkness for a whopping 5.5 million years! Scientists carved out an opening to the cave and found that a completely sustained ecosystem was thriving inside! - Circles of Namibia are almost perfect and range anywhere from 10 to 65 ft in diameter. Many scientists have offered up theories as to why these circles appear instead of other more random shapes. - But in Western Venezuela, over the mouth of the Catatumbo River, there’s a lightning storm that seems to be running on Energizer batteries — it just keeps going and going! Once the clock strikes 7 PM, the lightning storm begins and doesn’t relent for another 10 long hours. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Photos: https://www.depositphotos.com East News ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 216157 BRIGHT SIDE
Scientific Studies: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
 
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John Oliver discusses how and why media outlets so often report untrue or incomplete information as science. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/lastweektonight
Views: 14213302 LastWeekTonight
7 of Australia's Most Terrifying Inhabitants
 
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If you've spent any time on the internet, you know that Australia is host to all sorts of horrible spiders and snakes. But that doesn't even begin to cover the myriad of dangerous, sometimes deadly, plants and animals you might encounter there! Hosted by: Hank Green Sydney funnel-web spider photo by Tirin Head to https://scishowfinds.com/ for hand selected artifacts of the universe! ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Lazarus G, Sam Lutfi, Nicholas Smith, D.A. Noe, alexander wadsworth, سلطان الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Bader AlGhamdi, James Harshaw, Patrick D. Ashmore, Candy, Tim Curwick, charles george, Saul, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Viraansh Bhanushali, Kevin Bealer, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Justin Lentz ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: Magpies: https://books.google.ca/books?id=OzgLUUrAnk0C&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/14/world/what-in-the-world/australia-magpie-season.html https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25503 http://www.jstor.org/stable/3783916?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents http://www.publish.csiro.au/MU/MU99011 http://www.publish.csiro.au/WR/WR01108 http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2002/07/04/2588235.htm Ticks: http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/content/ohp-tick-bite-prevention.htm https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4313755/ https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2009/190/9/association-between-tick-bite-reactions-and-red-meat-allergy-humans https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2017/206/7/tick-borne-infectious-diseases-australia Giant centipedes: https://australianmuseum.net.au/giant-centipede#sthash.6mqLLjk4.dpuf http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6651/7/3/679 http://www.abc.net.au/local/photos/2014/11/18/4130988.htm https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jmor.1052060307 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4104317/ Strychnine trees: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3442185/ http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1191/0960327102ht259cr http://jtropag.kau.in/index.php/ojs2/article/view/337 https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/abstract/10.1055/s-2003-818014 Cone snails: http://www.jbc.org/content/286/25/22546.short https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/ee3e/624eadd9db77817e45ac8da9f15af5ca946e.pdf [PDF] https://www.emedicinehealth.com/wilderness_cone_snail_sting/article_em.htm#cone_snail_sting_treatment http://ucgd.genetics.utah.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/1-s20-S0016648015002142-web.pdf [PDF] Gympie Gympies: http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/topics/science-environment/2009/06/gympie-gympie-once-stung,-never-forgotten/ https://www.writingclearscience.com.au/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/stingers.pdf [PDF] https://web.b.ebscohost.com/abstract?direct=true&profile=ehost&scope=site&authtype=crawler&jrnl=0004945X&AN=17291723&h=V5qs9mmzksDk72N%2fHWahkf%2bCVogW%2bXIm1Rq9Wp8cEL5ktr0QyuUOie5CuBHefWmeJBDAXyFIwVJVu1D6eABhYQ%3d%3d&crl=c&resultNs=AdminWebAuth&resultLocal=ErrCrlNotAuth&crlhashurl=login.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26profile%3dehost%26scope%3dsite%26authtype%3dcrawler%26jrnl%3d0004945X%26AN%3d17291723 Irukandji jellyfish: https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/running-ponies/the-smallest-and-deadliest-kingslayer-in-the-world/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9613803 https://journals.lww.com/em-news/Fulltext/2005/04000/The_Amazing_and_Bizarre_Discovery_of_Irukandji.37.aspx http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-01-18/researcher-warns-dangerous-jellyfish-moving-south/7095422 http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/topics/wildlife/2016/03/here-are-the-animals-really-most-likely-to-kill-you-in-australia/
Views: 656143 SciShow
‘Dark DNA’ Is the Latest Mystery in the World of Genetics… But What Is It?
 
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Seeker is nominated for a Webby! VOTE HERE: https://vote.webbyawards.com/PublicVoting#/2018/film-video/virtual-reality-360-video/vr-branded-interactive-game-or-real-time Scientists are beginning to understand mysterious parts of our DNA. Here’s what they’ve found so far. Rapid Evolution Is Real…These Species Changed in Front of Our Eyes - https://youtu.be/DrgR_tSVdLU Read More: Inside the Mysterious Dark Matter of the Human Genome https://www.popsci.com/science/article/2012-09/encode-project-sheds-light “When scientists sequenced the human genome a decade ago, it was somewhat like looking at a blueprint in a foreign language — everything was marked in its proper location, but no one could tell what it all meant.” Dark Dna: The Missing Matter At The Heart Of Nature https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23731680-200-dark-dna “The discovery that some animals thrive despite hugely mutated DNA hidden in their genome is forcing us to rethink some basics of evolution.” ‘Dark Matter’ Dna Influences Brain Development https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-00920-x “A puzzle posed by segments of 'dark matter' in genomes — long, winding strands of DNA with no obvious functions — has teased scientists for more than a decade. Now, a team has finally solved the riddle.” ____________________ Seeker inspires us to see the world through the lens of science and evokes a sense of curiosity, optimism and adventure. Visit the Seeker website https://www.seeker.com/videos Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Special thanks to Julian Huguet for hosting and writing this episode of Seeker! Check Julian out on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jhug00
Views: 863041 Seeker
10 Terrifying Places Science Still Can't Explain
 
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How to Learn More about the Earth. The scientific community has made great strides in discovering a lot about the planet we call home. Yet there’s still so much we don’t know! In this video, we’ll tell you about 10 of the most mysterious and bewildering places on Earth that even scientists can’t explain! Magnetic Hill, Skeleton Lake, Boiling River and a Dancing Forest. Plus, some mysterious waters where ships disappear. TIMESTAMPS Skeleton Lake 0:56 The Hessdalen Lights 1:53 Lake Anjikuni 2:41 The Devil's Sea 3:43 The Lake Michigan Triangle 4:44 Magnetic Hill 6:11 The Devil's Kettle 6:57 The Patomskiy Crater 7:57 The Boiling River 9:55 The Dancing Forest 11:16 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -Every year when the snow and frozen water melt, Roopkund Lake in the Himalayas reveals 300 skeletons dumped in it. -The Hessdalen Lights occasionally turn yellowish or reddish, and nobody knows what makes them change color. -Canadian fur trapper Joe Labelle came to a village located on the shore of Lake Anjikuni to find it completely deserted. -Some folks call the Devil's Sea the Pacific Bermuda Triangle since ships and planes tend to disappear there with the same regularity as its North Atlantic counterpart. -The Lake Michigan Triangle has been gaining its notorious reputation since 1891 when a ship disappeared in its waters, along with its crew of seven sailors. -If you turn off the engine of your car and leave it in neutral on the Magnetic Hill, your vehicle will start climbing ahead, possibly at a speed of 12 miles per hour. -About a mile before the river empties into Lake Superior, a rocky outcrop splits it in two. And while the eastern flow drops 50 feet down and keeps flowing into the lake, the western part travels 10 feet down into a giant hole... and vanishes. -Located in Siberia, the Patomskiy Crater is described as a mound with a perfectly circular shape. It’s as big as a 25-story building, sits right in the middle of a wooded area with its top chopped off, and presents quite a sight. -The Boling River really is steaming hot. At a temperature of 187°F, it’s not exactly boiling, but it’s pretty close. -Located on the thin Curonian Spit that divides the Baltic Sea from the Curonian Lagoon is one of the strangest places on Earth. The pine trees in this forest have shockingly unusual shapes: they twist in spirals and circles along the ground. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 2176195 BRIGHT SIDE
The Animals of Chernobyl | The New York Times
 
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Biologist Timothy Mousseau has been studying the lasting effects of radiation on the flora and fauna of Chernobyl, Ukraine. Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n After the Chernobyl disaster humans haven't been allowed to live in the vicinity. That hasn't stopped animals and wildlife from moving into the radioactive area. Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1o2H7Kf --------------------------------------------------------------- Want more from The New York Times? Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nytvideo Twitter: https://twitter.com/nytvideo Instagram: http://instagram.com/nytvideo Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch. On YouTube. The Animals of Chernobyl | The New York Timeshttp://www.youtube.com/user/TheNewYorkTimes
Views: 7533808 The New York Times
7 Mysteries Science Hasn't Solved
 
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Even science can't yet explain these 7 extremely cool, weird phenomena in the universe, despite decades or even centuries of research. Hosted by: Olivia Gordon SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It's called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at https://www.scishowtangents.org ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Alex Schuerch, Alex Hackman, Andrew Finley Brenan, Sam Lutfi, D.A. Noe, الخليفي سلطان, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Patrick D. Ashmore, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Chris Peters ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: Ball Lightning https://phys.org/news/2012-10-mystery-ball-lightning.html https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/periodically-i-hear-stori/ https://www.livescience.com/61946-ball-lightning-quantum-particle.html https://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.048501 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/252000845_The_Riddle_of_Ball_Lightning_A_Review https://books.google.com/books?id=TCTpu1UVFsYC&pg=PA633#v=onepage&q&f=false Skyquakes http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20141202-mystery-booms-whats-the-cause http://www.seismosoc.org/Publications/SRL/SRL_82/srl_82-5_op/hill_op.html http://www.wnpr.org/post/loud-booms-caused-microearthquakes-seismologist-says Fast Radio Bursts https://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-news/astronomers-trace-fast-radio-burst-to-a-surprising-source/ https://aasnova.org/2017/09/20/a-fast-radio-burst-every-second/ Star Jelly https://biomeecology.com/nature/2018/02/what-is-star-jelly/ https://io9.gizmodo.com/the-enduring-myth-of-star-jelly-1693997962 https://skeptoid.com/episodes/4299 https://www.nature.com/articles/083492a0 https://tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0015587X.1984.9716316 https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-05239-7_5 Forest Rings https://www.cbc.ca/news2/background/tech/science/forest-rings.html http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/10.1139/b01-022#.XBEZdnpKj9R https://geoscan.nrcan.gc.ca/starweb/geoscan/servlet.starweb?path=geoscan/fulle.web&search1=R=210206 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1758-2229.12678 https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/industry-news/green/searching-for-gas-in-the-swampy-far-north-364148 Hessdalen Lights https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Massimo_Teodorani/publication/228609015_A_long-term_scientific_survey_of_the_Hessdalen_phenomenon/links/55141e340cf283ee0834a6a5.pdf https://www.nature.com/webcasts/event/optical-trapping-of-ion-coulomb-crystals/ https://io9.gizmodo.com/what-causes-the-hessdalen-lights-1653174566 https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22229680-600-norse-ufos-what-are-the-glowing-orbs-of-hessdalen/ Desert Varnish http://minerals.gps.caltech.edu/FILES/VARNISH/Index.html https://www.nps.gov/articles/desertvarnish.htm https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2006/07/solving-mystery-desert-varnish https://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/apr/14/shadow-biosphere-alien-life-on-earth Images: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ball_lightning.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ball_lightning.png https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:F-18_Hornet_performs_a_fly_by_on_the_USS_Dwight_D._Eisenhower.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:%D8%B2%D8%AE%D8%A9_%D8%B4%D9%87%D8%A8_%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%A8%D8%B1%D8%B4%D8%A7%D9%88%D9%8A%D8%A7%D8%AA.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gashydrat_im_Sediment.JPG https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tetrakaidecahedral_methane_clathrate1.png https://www.videoblocks.com/video/slow-motion-time-lapse-of-clouds-rolling-in-the-sky-q9s8c4z https://freesound.org/people/bajko/sounds/399656/ https://vimeo.com/146295242 - https://public.nrao.edu/media-use/ https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/13058 https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/11530 https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/20267 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Star_jelly_-_lindsey.jpg https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3777341 https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12602 https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3889121 https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1214339 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frog_in_frogspawn.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Yellow_slime_mold.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Goldgelber_Zitterling_-_Tremella_mesenterica_-_yellow_brain_-_Tr%C3%A9melle_m%C3%A9sent%C3%A9rique_-_golden_jelly_fungus_-_01.jpg https://www.flickr.com/photos/adonofrio/6268871099 - www.biology101.org https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cyanobacteria_Nostoc_commune.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Boreal_Forest_Ring.jpg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wk842pg0Pvs https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Desert_varnish.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Valley_of_Fire_petroglyphs.jpg
Views: 356861 SciShow
Causes and Effects of Climate Change | National Geographic
 
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What causes climate change (also known as global warming)? And what are the effects of climate change? Learn the human impact and consequences of climate change for the environment, and our lives. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Causes and Effects of Climate Change | National Geographic https://youtu.be/G4H1N_yXBiA National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 642974 National Geographic
Scientists Finally Show Who The Yeti Is
 
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We’ve all heard of the Yeti, but only a few people in the world claim to have seen one. What is this human-like monster? Is it dangerous to us? And, for that matter, does it even exist at all? Bright Side has summed up results from the latest research on the nature of the Yeti. Are you ready for the truth to be unveiled right before your eyes? For thousands of years, people have been searching for the Yeti, for any proof of its existence, and for the origins of this creature. If you’re a Yeti fan yourself, you’re not going to love for what we have to tell you. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1201510 BRIGHT SIDE
Animal Habitats | Animal Homes | Animals video for kids |
 
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The natural home or environment of a plant, an animal, or other organism is known as habitat. Animals live in habitats all over that are suitable for them.Some of these habitats are: Grasslands,Deserts, Rain forests and Arctic Tundra. This video explains about animal habitat or animal homes. Some popular animals and name of their homes: Lion- Den Dog- Kennel Sheep- Pen Elephant- Forest Hen- Coop Deer- Grasslands Horse- Stable Cow- Shed Rat- Hole Monkey- Tree Pig- Sty Rabbit- Burrow Fish- Water Spider- Cobweb Snake- Hole Ant- Colonies Zebra- Jungle Bee- Beehive #Education #Science #Kids #Animal Home #Animal Habitat For more videos go to: https://www.youtube.com/user/learningjunction/videos Stay tuned for more videos. Thank you
Views: 556882 learning junction
6 Organisms That Cheat the System
 
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Humans are not the only animal that use cheats to make things easier. Some of the animals and plants have weird but very clever cheating skills to survive in their environment, too. Hosted by: Michael Aranda Learn more about Brood Parasitism: https://youtu.be/HpIhSLXQ5oc Want more SciShow in person? We'll be at NerdCon: Nerdfighteria in Boston on February 25th and 26th! For more information, go to http://www.nerdconnerdfighteria.com/ ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters—we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Kevin Bealer, Mark Terrio-Cameron, KatieMarie Magnone, Patrick Merrithew, Charles Southerland, Fatima Iqbal, Benny, Kyle Anderson, Tim Curwick, Scott Satovsky Jr, Will and Sonja Marple, Philippe von Bergen, Bella Nash, Bryce Daifuku, Chris Peters, Patrick D. Ashmore, Charles George, Bader AlGhamdi ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://www.britannica.com/science/nectar http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu/portal/species/overview?p_p_spp=634796 http://www.jstor.org/stable/4163964 http://www.jstor.org/stable/3450570 http://zootis.zoologi.su.se/research/leimar/fulltext/Bshary_etal2008.pdf http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/187396/0 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1809949/pdf/14667394.pdf http://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/the-ecology-of-avian-brood-parasitism-14724491 https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Brown-headed_Cowbird/ http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003347212004010 http://www.pnas.org/content/94/18/9723.full https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC411366/pdf/pnas00014-0377.pdf http://www.amjbot.org/content/92/8/1342.full Image Sources: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Slaty_Flowerpiercer_RWD5.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cleaning_station_konan.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Brown-headed_Cowbird_(14115656207).jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Eastern_Phoebe-nest-Brown-headed-Cowbird-egg.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Savannah_Sparrow,_Passerculus_sandwichensis,_and_Brown_headed_Cowbird,_Molothrus_ater,_nest_eggs_parasitism_closeup.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hyla_arborea_(Marek_Szczepanek).jpg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photuris#/media/File:Photuris_lucicrescens.jpg https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/31759434616/in/photolist-J8hPju-dfTB3w-xZvStE-QotpqU-G9gb3b-u2mifa https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Photinus#/media/File:Photinus_sp.jpg https://www.flickr.com/photos/mwhitehead/12662876285/in/photolist-khYxXc-dVU7gy-dVU5dW-dVNvLp-dVU55N Photo by Michael Whitehead https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/16616316055/in/photolist-umSs7P-rjjXRR-dSPtf3-qnydRH-8dpRY7-2PdyE4-2Pdytp-CKkLmY-5WgS3U-QHs9sw-umSrEX-viH4Ck Photo by alice nicolson
Views: 844646 SciShow
The 6 Craziest Extinctions Ever
 
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The earth has been through some major changes! Animals we wish still existed: http://youtu.be/wutj5z1lElU SUBSCRIBE (it's free): http://bit.ly/10kWnZ7 GET THE BOOK: http://asapscience.com/book/ Written by Tyler Irving (@tylereirving), Mitchell Moffit and Greg Brown Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! SNAPCHAT 'whalewatchmeplz' and 'pixelmitch' Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 Further Reading-- Overviews: http://listverse.com/2012/03/09/top-10-mass-extinctions/ http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v471/n7336/full/nature09678.html Ordovician: Role of CO2 levels: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S003101821000115X http://geology.gsapubs.org/content/37/10/951.abstract http://www.skepticalscience.com/CO2-was-higher-in-late-Ordovician.htm http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn18618-highcarbon-ice-age-mystery-solved.html#.VK1lhmTF98s Devonian: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_Devonian_extinction http://www.devoniantimes.org/opportunity/massExtinction.html http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/life/dinosaurs-other-extinct-creatures/mass-extinctions/late-devonian-mass-extinction/index.html Permian Good overviews: http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/prehistoric-world/permian-extinction/ http://www.businessinsider.com/volcanic-eruptions-caused-permian-extinction-2014-12 Size of lava fields: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siberian_Traps Effect of volcanoes; http://articles.latimes.com/2005/jan/21/science/sci-extinct21 http://www.livescience.com/41909-new-clues-permian-mass-extinction.html Recovery: http://scitechdaily.com/earth-recovered-10-million-years-after-permian-triassic-mass-extinction/ Triassic http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/life/dinosaurs-other-extinct-creatures/mass-extinctions/end-triassic-mass-extinction/index.html http://earth.columbia.edu/articles/view/3070 http://www.wired.com/2011/07/mass-extinction-methane/ Cretaceous: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/life/dinosaurs-other-extinct-creatures/mass-extinctions/end-cretaceous-mass-extinction/index.html http://www.space.com/19681-dinosaur-killing-asteroid-chicxulub-crater.html 6th mass extinction: http://www.businessinsider.com/earths-sixth-mass-extinction-is-already-happening-2014-7 http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/animal-extinction--the-greatest-threat-to-mankind- 397939.html By the numbers: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/345/6195/401 Extinction rates: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v471/n7336/full/nature09678.html http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cobi.12380/abstract
Views: 3253459 AsapSCIENCE
Scientists Have Found Plastic-Eating Bacteria
 
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How to solve the plastic pollution problem? Bacteria that munch on plastic: could this be the answer to the humanity’s environmental crisis? After all, we’re drowning in tons of plastic, and it’s hurting our oceans, the creatures in them, and even our own health! This microscopic plastic-eater isn’t your average bacteria. Scientists actually found a way to mutate this microorganism and boost its planet-saving superpower. It can make the world a better place by eating away all the plastic waste. And with about 20,000 water bottles being bought every second around the world, it’s got a big job to do. TIMESTAMPS: What plastic-eater is 0:52 How much plastic end up in our oceans every year 1:41 How long it takes for plastics to biodegrade 4:03 What it all started with 4:37 Enzyme technology 6:55 How you can reduce your use of plastic 7:14 #plasticeatingbacteria #pollution #savetheplanet Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - A staggering 19 billion pounds of plastic end up in our oceans every year. Once it’s there, it gets ingested by the animals that humans eat, which means our health gets affected too. - Plastic can disrupt ecosystems and create more and more areas where nothing can survive. - Plastic is all around us, and (get this) it’s even inside of us! Plastic is used so extensively that it’s been found in human stool! - It takes around 400 years for some types of plastic to fully biodegrade, like the ones used in water and soda bottles. - Japanese researchers discovered a strand of bacteria that’s evolved to eat a particular type of plastic called polyethylene terephthalate, commonly known as PET or PETE. - According to them, the bacteria could break the plastic down into smaller pieces but not fully eat it away. It took about 6 weeks for the bacteria to eat through a thin layer of plastic. - Enzyme technology could be used to help humanity’s trash problem, but it’s still in its early stages. The researchers are continuing to tweak the enzyme in hopes that they can improve upon it even further and use it on a larger scale. - The creation of this super enzyme is a great way to kick off a solution to plastic pollution. But this enzyme, despite its mutant nature, can’t undo all the pollution that’s currently in the world. - As long as people keep buying and using it, companies will continue to manufacture plastic. The cycle will keep on going until the consumer is willing to break it. - Don’t give into the lazy convenience of plastic plates and utensils. Use porcelain dinnerware, and just do the dishes afterwards. Just make it fun and turn on some music or your favorite show! Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 487666 BRIGHT SIDE
CARNIVAL SCAM SCIENCE- and how to win
 
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Prepare to drop some knowledge next time you visit the carnival. Go expand your mind and learn something new at Skillshare.com. The first 300 people (they opened this up to first 2,000) get 2 months FREE! http://bit.ly/SkillShareMarkRober MUSIC- 0:21- Ceral Killa- Blue Wednesday - https://soundcloud.com/bluewednesday/ 0:53- Carnival Song written special by Andrew Applepie- http://andrewapplepie.com/ 3:40- Berlin- Andrew Applepie- http://andrewapplepie.com/ 10:00- Q- Blue Wednesday - https://soundcloud.com/bluewednesday/ 11:13- Too Happy to be cool by Notebreak- https://soundcloud.com/notebreak/dubstep-too-happy-to-be-cool Summary: I collected data at the carnival for a full day. Then I used that information to figure out which games are the biggest scams using science to analyze them and show you how to beat them. I also figured out how much the carnival actually pays for the prizes so even if you win, you lose. And then I visited the carnival with my professional baseball playing buddy to dominate all the games. It worked well. PLEASE CONSIDER SUBSCRIBING: http://tinyurl.com/MarkRober-Sub ****************************************­ I make videos like this once a month all year long while supplies last: CHECK OUT MY CHANNEL: http://tinyurl.com/MarkRober-YouTube FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/MarkRoberYouTube TWITTER: https://twitter.com/#!/MarkRober INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/markrober/
Views: 32362233 Mark Rober
Are You Capable of Murder?
 
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The Ted Bundy Tapes had us wonder what it takes to be a killer. Deep Fake Video: https://youtu.be/KSdU5B_fdVo Sidenote Podcast: https://youtu.be/1AlRtUToWGk Ask us your burning questions in the comments! Created by: Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown Written by: Rachel Salt, Greg Brown & Mitch Moffit Illustrated by: Max Simmons Edited by: Sel Ghebrehiwot FOLLOW US! Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 REFERENCES/FURTHER READING https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/09/human-violence-evolution-animals-nature-science/ https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/sep/28/natural-born-killers-humans-predisposed-to-study-suggests https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/03/160322-prairie-dogs-squirrels-murders-animals-killers/ https://www.nature.com/articles/nature19758.epdf?referrer_access_token=EJzEvQnuXU42j9ANFW5o8dRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0MV6-Ms_XF0JyPRKMYcJKvFNyitEBmuupIJl7POcPVLQQIqO3O-Bz7JzI6FX6BHZ1ZsOnBh_nFJyHDnZ_P1dWIT5us5O8xXED9OQ6pIXAdTVIBK_CvI7ev1IwZNxaFw2WCa-0X8xSaDSeXWvXRSFG__&tracking_referrer=news.nationalgeographic.com https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/03/160322-prairie-dogs-squirrels-murders-animals-killers/ https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/article-abstract/2436272 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170511141953.htm https://www.livescience.com/52126-heart-rate-violent-crimes.html https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2018/investigations/domestic-violence-murders/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.26f889975b5c https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/07/21/538518569/cdc-half-of-all-female-murder-victims-are-killed-by-intimate-partners https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1635092 https://www.nature.com/news/2008/080130/full/451512a.html#B6 https://www.biologicalpsychiatryjournal.com/article/S0006-3223(96)00362-9/pdf https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-31714853 https://www.mygenefood.com/warrior-gene-5-common-myths/ https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090121093343.htm http://maamodt.asp.radford.edu/Research%20-%20Forensic/2005%2020-1-Mitchell-40-47.pdf https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090121093343.htm https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-31714853 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1635092 https://www.jem-journal.com/article/S0736-4679(07)00414-3/abstract https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2018/investigations/domestic-violence-murders/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.26f889975b5c https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4368577/ https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2006/oct/17/prisonsandprobation.ukcrime https://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/may/12/how-to-spot-a-murderers-brain https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/09/humans-are-unusually-violent-mammals-but-averagely-violent-primates/501935/ https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6622a5.htm
Views: 786614 AsapSCIENCE
R.J. B. Your favorite animals.
 
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Find out everything there is to know about inventions and stay updated on the latest inventions with comprehensive articles, interactive features and pictures at Live Science.
Views: 17 Live Science
Reflections on the science news stories of 2017 | Science News
 
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As 2017 comes to a close, we asked the Science News staff to reflect on the highlights of the past year. What were your favorite stories of 2017? Tell us in the comments section below. Science News staff picks: “Animal goo inspires better glue” – https://www.sciencenews.org/article/animal-goo-inspires-better-glue “We went to the March for Science in D.C. Here’s what happened” – https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-public/we-went-march-science-dc-heres-what-happened “Neutron star collision showers the universe with a wealth of discoveries” - https://www.sciencenews.org/article/neutron-star-collision-gravitational-waves “50 years ago, engineers tried catching commercial planes in nets” - https://www.sciencenews.org/article/50-years-ago-engineers-tried-catching-commercial-planes-nets “Mystery void is discovered in the Great Pyramid of Giza” - https://www.sciencenews.org/article/mystery-void-discovered-great-pyramid-giza “A star explodes: The story of Supernova1987A” - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67LLoVnwUgw “African farmers’ kids conquer the marshmallow test” - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67LLoVnwUgw “Defining species is a fuzzy art” - https://www.sciencenews.org/article/defining-species-fuzzy-art “DNA evidence is rewriting domestication origin stories” - https://www.sciencenews.org/article/dna-evidence-rewriting-domestication-origin-stories “Being a vampire can be brutal. Here’s how the bloodsuckers get by.” - https://www.sciencenews.org/article/blood-real-vampires-animals “Scallops’ amazing eyes use millions of tiny, square crystals to see” - https://www.sciencenews.org/article/scallops-amazing-eyes-use-millions-tiny-square-crystals-see “R.I.P. Cassini” - https://www.sciencenews.org/article/rip-cassini-saturn-nasa “What will scientists learn from the Great American Eclipse?” - https://www.sciencenews.org/article/2017-solar-eclipse-science-questions CREDITS Video, production & editing Helen Thompson Additional footage & images Neutron star collision: NASA Goddard Pyramid void: ScanPyramids Mission Vampires: Matt Griffin Scallop eyes: Shane Kato/iStockphoto Eclipse: Kate Travis Dragon Con: Robert Saey Music “Retrospect” by Dee Yan-Key (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Dee_Yan-Key/Crises/02--Dee_Yan-Key-Retrospect
Views: 1464 Science News
Learn Grade 3 - Science - Animals and their cries
 
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In this video you get to Learn Grade 3 - Science - Animals and their cries
9 Groundbreaking Discoveries About Sleep
 
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There's a lot about sleep that we don't understand, like why we even sleep in the first place, for example. Here are some amazing discoveries biologists have made while trying to solve the mystery of sleep. Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters—we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Kevin Bealer, Mark Terrio-Cameron, KatieMarie Magnone, Patrick Merrithew, Charles Southerland, Fatima Iqbal, Benny, Kyle Anderson, Tim Curwick, Scott Satovsky Jr, Will and Sonja Marple, Philippe von Bergen, Bella Nash, Bryce Daifuku, Chris Peters, Patrick D. Ashmore, Charles George, Bader AlGhamdi ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/6429/fatal-familial-insomnia http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM198610163151605 http://www.nytimes.com/2001/05/06/magazine/3-case-study-fatal-familial-insomnia-location-venice-italy-to-sleep-no-more.html http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/016643289500020T Brain activity http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12576-015-0414-3 http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/74/1/9 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/81/2111/597 Brain centers http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12576-015-0414-3 http://psycnet.apa.org/psycinfo/1932-00279-000 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0361923006000463 Memory http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0149763414002474 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5020097/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3768102/ Healing https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16120095 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9456469 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306987711002234?np=y https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1299128/ Pain https://www.uni-bamberg.de/fileadmin/uni/fakultaeten/ppp_professuren/physiologische_psychologie/Publikation/sleepmedicinereviews.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25915149 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/216974 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/176677 Blue light https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/q-a-why-is-blue-light-before-bedtime-bad-for-sleep/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23509952 http://www.pnas.org/content/112/4/1232 Dishwasher https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3551275/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24199995 Ancestors https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26654373
Views: 1056634 SciShow
Biomedical & Industrial Engineering: Crash Course Engineering #6
 
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We’ve discussed the four main branches of engineering but there are so many other fields doing important work, so today we’re going to explore a few of them. In this episode we’ll explore some of the history and fundamentals of industrial engineering, biomedical engineering, and bioengineering. Crash Course Engineering is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV *** RESOURCES: https://www.livescience.com/47702-aerospace-engineering.html https://www.egr.msu.edu/undergraduate/academics/programs/aesjob http://educatingengineers.com/degrees/applied-engineering https://www.bls.gov/ooh/architecture-and-engineering/industrial-engineers.htm http://mime.oregonstate.edu/what-do-industrial-engineers-do https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/lights-out-manufacturing/ https://www.automationworld.com/article/technologies/robotics/turning-out-lights-factory-floor https://www.britannica.com/biography/Frederick-W-Taylor http://www.mtu.edu/biomedical/department/what-is/ https://www.britannica.com/technology/bioengineering https://www.livescience.com/59581-ancient-prosthetic-toe-found-in-egyptian-grave.html https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/study-reveals-secrets-ancient-cairo-toe-180963783/ https://www.britannica.com/biography/Rene-Laennec https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1570491/ https://www.britannica.com/biography/Wilhelm-Rontgen https://www.seas.upenn.edu/about-seas/history.php https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2962861/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4537472/ https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S014296121301569X *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Jason Saslow, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Evren Türkmenoğlu, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 127980 CrashCourse
The Real Science of Forensics
 
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In this episode of SciShow, we’re going to investigate a murder. But first, we’re going to have to learn all about forensics, the use of science in criminal law -- and the real-life version is a little different from what you might see on TV. Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Justin Lentz, David Campos, Chris Peters, and Fatima Iqbal. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow Sources: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2014/04/fbi-plans-have-52-million-photos-its-ngi-face-recognition-database-next-year http://www.alternet.org/story/153664/5_things_you_should_know_about_the_fbi's_massive_new_biometric_database http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/13/us/facial-recognition-software-moves-from-overseas-wars-to-local-police.html http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/15/opinion/how-the-fbi-uses-facial-recognition-analysis.html?_r=2 http://www.theverge.com/2014/8/8/5982727/face-wreck-how-advanced-tech-comes-up-short-for-police http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/genetic/dna-evidence.htm http://www.scientific.org/tutorials/articles/riley/riley.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/0/20205874 http://www.mlo-online.com/articles/201404/str-typing-method-and-applications.php http://www.cstl.nist.gov/strbase/pub_pres/Butler_BiotechniquesSuppl_Oct2007.pdf http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/high-tech-gadgets/facial-recognition1.htm http://www.mitchpileggi.net/Deep_Background/resources/forensics/bodies.htm https://books.google.com/books?id=adKcM055ERoC&pg=PT265 http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/biology/b103/f02/web2/wcarroll.html http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/43078/stop-believing-tvs-lies-the-real-truth-about-enhancing-images/ http://nzic.org.nz/ChemProcesses/biotech/12A.pdf
Views: 806187 SciShow
Studying plants and animals from wild environments
 
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'I don't think I ever really did decide to become a scientist, it just sort of happened.' Dr Ceridwen Fraser of the Fenner School of Environment and Society, Australian National University is the 2018 recipient of the Australian Academy of Science Fenner Medal. Find out more: https://www.science.org.au/curious/earth-environment/brave-new-worlds-colonising-and-surviving-antarctica ~ Thanks for watching! Click subscribe and the notification bell to see our videos in your feed. For more videos and articles like and follow our Facebook page and our other social pages. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AustralianAcademyofScience/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ausacademyofscience/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Science_Academy About us: The Australian Academy of Science is an independent organisation representing Australia's leading scientists. It recognises excellence, advises government and promotes science education and public awareness of science. About our channel: We create and upload videos reviewed by experts in scientific fields and other leading academics to ensure scientific accuracy. You can also find some amazing lectures given by top scientists at one of our events held at our HQ-the Shine Dome in Canberra or across Australia. Thanks for watching and please subscribe and give our Facebook page a like!
How dogs love us | Dr. Gregory Berns | TEDxAtlanta
 
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Ever wondered what your dog is thinking? Does he really miss you when you’re gone? Finally, we have the answer, thanks to MRI technology. Dr. Gregory Berns is revealing how our mind works, helping us to explore unknown connections along the way. Using advanced brain imaging technologies in his extensive research, Dr. Gregory Berns has helped us better understand human motivation and decision-making. His most recent work explores and details how dogs love us, uncovering the empathy and the bonds we both feel. Dr Berns' research is frequently the subject of popular media coverage including articles in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Money, Oprah, Forbes, The Financial Times, Wired, The New Scientists and the International Herald Tribune. He is the author of the New York Times bestseller How Dogs Love Us and also speaks frequently on CNN and NPR This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 667485 TEDx Talks
Can Lobsters Really Not Die of Old Age?
 
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→Subscribe for new videos every day! https://www.youtube.com/user/TodayIFoundOut?sub_confirmation=1 →How "Dick" came to be short for 'Richard': https://youtu.be/BH1NAwwKtcg?list=PLR0XuDegDqP2Acy6g9Ta7hzC0Rr3RDS6q Never run out of things to say at the water cooler with TodayIFoundOut! Brand new videos 7 days a week! More from TodayIFoundOut Why a Bakers Dozen is 13 Instead of 12 https://youtu.be/UPDV0POS5d0?list=PLR0XuDegDqP3XRa-w_G0dy_aMMXj0Uq-k Why Vampires Can't Exist... and 9 Other Amazing Facts https://youtu.be/cDlat4Pdd4U?list=PLR0XuDegDqP1IHZBUZvKkPwkTr6Gr0OBO In this video: You’ll often hear it claimed that lobsters are biologically immortal. So is it true? Not really, though this is partially an argument in semantics as you’ll soon see. (And while we’re on the topic of lobster myths, no: Lobsters do not mate for life. In fact, the male lobster pretty much gets it on with every female lobster that comes a knockin’. And they do almost literally line up and knock on the male’s door.) Want the text version?: http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2016/02/can-lobsters-really-not-die-old-age/ Sources: http://biomedgerontology.oxfordjournals.org/content/62/2/149.long http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1691385/ http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3600044 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6hn3sA0ip0 http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/chromosomes/telomeres/ http://maine-lobster.com/lobster-facts http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/invertebrates/lobster/ http://time.com/3184569/11-lobster-facts-that-will-leave-you-shell-shocked/ http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2011/0616/How-large-can-lobsters-grow-Big!-But-no-one-knows-how-big http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/4213315/George-the-140-year-old-lobster-to-be-released-by-New-York-restaurant.html http://theweek.com/articles/460049/could-lobsters-help-live-forever http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2418252/Do-lobsters-hold-key-eternal-life-Forget-gastronomic-indulgence-crustacean-defy-ageing-process.html http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/dont-listen-to-the-buzz-lobsters-arent-actually-immortal-88450872/?no-ist https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_immortality#Attempts_to_engineer_biological_immortality_in_humans https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobster#Longevity http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/10294152/Lobsters-may-hold-the-key-to-eternal-life.html http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=11382976 http://memory.ucsf.edu/ftd/overview/biology/genetics/multiple http://neurodojo.blogspot.com/2013/05/all-lobsters-are-mortal.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telomere https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senescence https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_immortality https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hayflick_limit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leach's_storm_petrel http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/722306_1 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RNA
Views: 1801116 Today I Found Out
Scientists train spider to jump on demand to discover secrets of animal movement
 
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This movie is based on work reported in "Energy and time optimal trajectories in exploratory jumps of the spider Phidippus regius" published in Scientific Reports on the 8th of May 2018. The paper is available online at www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-25227-9. Credit: Video edited and produced by Girupakaran Sivalingam, Bill Crowther and Mostafa Nabawy. Sound design by Conor Marsh. Music:
Views: 182 ZME Science
Is Masturbation Good For You?
 
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How often should you whack the weed? Get our TSHIRT!! http://represent.com/asapscience SHARE on Twitter:http://bit.ly/1KcMpxa & Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1Megz5H SUBSCRIBE (it's free): http://bit.ly/asapsci GET THE ASAPSCIENCE BOOK: http://asapscience.com/book/ Written by Rachel Salt, Gregory Brown and Mitchell Moffit FOLLOW US! Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! SNAPCHAT 'whalewatchmeplz' and 'pixelmitch' Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 Further Reading: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10508-006-9123-6 Prevalence of Masturbation and Associated Factors in a British National Probability Survey http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11805404 Dopamine and male sexual function. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3104618/ Understanding Endorphins and Their Importance in Pain Management http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15316239 Effects of sexual arousal on lymphocyte subset circulation and cytokine production in man http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15069045?dopt=Abstract Ejaculation frequency and subsequent risk of prostate cancer. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11835982 Orgasm-induced prolactin secretion: feedback control of sexual drive? http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10367606 Cardiovascular and endocrine alterations after masturbation-induced orgasm in women. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8191199 Prolactin secretion and sleep. http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/self-love-animal-kingdom Self-love in the animal kingdom. http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Mark_Bellis2/publication/229125576_Human_sperm_competition_ejaculate_adjustment_by_males_and_the_function_of_masturbation/links/5404776e0cf23d9765a63688.pdf Human sperm competition: ejaculate adjustment by males and the function of masturbation http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1521693405001112 Sexual function and pelvic floor disorders http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1324914/ Randomised controlled trial of pelvic floor muscle exercises and manometric biofeedback for erectile dysfunction http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17728050 The role of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors in the management of premature ejaculation: a critical analysis of basic science and clinical data.
Views: 19522783 AsapSCIENCE
10 Innocent Animals That Will Disappear Because Of Humans
 
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Animals are a part of our everyday life. Whether that's in the form of cute and cuddly pets, the food that we buy at the supermarket, or the clothes that we wear: it's impossible to go about your daily life without having some kind of animal interaction. But while most of the world can appreciate these weird and wonderful creatures for what they are, some people are determined to ignore their plight for survival. Because, let's face it, a growing population combined with a potential lack of resources means some people are getting greedy and putting the animals to the back of their mind. Interested? You can also check out other similar videos: Like 8 Pets You Should Never Release In The Wild Or This Will Happen https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSHoZOl_vhg Or 10 Richest Kids In The World 2019 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZkvSDHHhRI Back to the animals. These innocent creatures deserve to survive too, but humans are making it increasingly difficult with the current circumstances. Many of these animals find their population numbers diminished due to poaching or overfishing. Cruel poachers in the wild like to set traps for wild animals in order to make use of parts of their bodies. Sometimes it's for traditional medicines, and other times it's just for financial gain. But that's not the only reason why many species are slowly going extinct. As the human population grows, so does the amount of space taken up for housing, schools, and retail parks. In other countries, like Rwanda, political and civil unrest has resulted in Mountain Gorillas living far too close to humans, because the refugees left over from the trauma that the country suffered had to find somewhere in the wild to settle. And some creatures even find themselves disappearing from the wild just by getting too caught up in whatever's going on nearby. It's clear that something needs to change, otherwise, these beautiful animals will be around no longer. Curious about the other amazing and mysterious things happening all over our world? Then, Subscribe to TheRichest for more videos! ► http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-Richest ◄ For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] Our Social Media: Facebook: https://facebook.com/TheRichest.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheRichest_Com Instagram: http://instagram.com/therichest For more videos and articles visit: http://therichest.com/
Views: 43029 TheRichest
Biology Bytes Short Tricks--Structural Organisation in Animals |NEET|AIIMS NCERT Biology Class 11
 
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(Biology Bytes NEET Short Trick neet notes for --Structural Organisation in Animals Simple Epithelium|NCERT Biology For AIIMS|JIPMER|Class 11) Memory techniques for studying Structural Organisation in Animals- Different examples of all the categories-Squamous,Cuboidal,Columnar,Ciliated And Glandular to make good class 11 & class 12 Biology notes using these science tricks in hindi.Also Good for Biology G.k in hindi. We will see Biological Classification of class 11 ncert in detail to qualify for NEET 2018. #ShortTricksWithBiologyByte ►Other videos you will love want to watch: Best Ways To Concentrate On Studies: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hGI-Q7s_UTM How To Study In A Short Time:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lRM0ooHG3SE How To Study For Long Hours Effectively: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=impEgcczTyE What Is the best time To Study Day Or Night? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHGVBvBlCbQ ◄ ◅✦ ☾ Thank you for watching! ☽✦ ▸ ▹ For more latest video and articles, stay connected and get updates from me. Follow biologybyte on social media: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/BiologyByte-... Google+ - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+HAPPYNES...
Views: 91580 BiologyByte
7 Animals You'll Be Glad Are Extinct
 
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7 extinct animals you'll be glad are extinct! From prehistoric creatures to scary predators, these dinosaurs & beasts are nightmarish. Subscribe for new videos: http://goo.gl/SaufF4 Voiceover by Rodney Tompkins: https://www.youtube.com/c/BigBadada2012 7: The Dire Wolf During the Pleistocene, the dire wolf also known as Canis dirus inhabited different areas around North and South America. Although the average dire wolf was similar in size to the larger specimens of present day’s grey wolf, its vicious bite was the strongest of any Canis species to date. Their teeth were also larger and featured a greater shearing ability. It is also believed that they used their bite to crush the bones of their prey and eat the marrow in order to extract the maximum nutritional capacity out of each kill. Based on the numerous specimens recovered from the La Brea 6: The Smilodon The smilodon is one of the best known species of what is commonly known as the saber-toothed cat. Smilodons inhabited regions in the Americas during the Pleistocene era, around 1.6 million to 10.000 years ago. Thousands of smilodon fossil specimens were discovered in the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, US. Their most distinctive features were their canines which could grow as long as 12 inches for the Smilodon populator, the largest of the smilodon species. Their height was estimated 5: The Terror Bird The Phorusrhacidae also known as the terror birds were a type of large carnivorous flightless bird. It was the apex predator in the South American region, during the Cenozoic era. Terror birds ranged in height with the largest specimens standing almost 10 feet tall. They had large heads and powerful beaks but also great flexibility in their long necks. This enabled them to deliver devastating strikes on their prey. They would often use their height as a means of intimidation. Before delivering a downward attack 4: The Spinosaurus Similar to the T-Rex the Spinosaurus was also a theropod dinosaur meaning that it was a massive land carnivore. It lived during the Cretaceous period, approximately 112 to 97 million years ago, mainly in the swamps of North Africa. Its scientific name, which translates to ‘spine lizard’, reflects the dinosaur’s most distinctive feature. The Spinosaurus had tall neural spines growing on its back vertebrae which were connected to each other by skin to form what scientists have referred to as the ‘sail’. The sail’s function is still unclear. With its sail fully extended the Spinosaurus 3: The Titanoboa The titanoboa is the largest genus of snake ever discovered with an estimated weight of 2.500 pounds and a length of almost 50 feet. Upon its discovery it was believed that the titanoboa was an apex predator of the Palogene epoch inhabiting Earth’s tropical regions approximately 50-60 million years ago. However, later analysis indicated that the snake was mainly piscivorous, meaning that its diet consisted mostly of fish. When it would take on larger prey, the serpent would use its massive body to constrict its prey 2: The Tyrannosaurus Rex The name ‘Rex’ comes from Latin and translates as ‘king’. Considering the fact that the Tyrannosaurus Rex is one of the largest predators that have ever lived, the name does it justice. The T-Rex was one of the few non-avian dinosaurs that were still roaming the Earth, prior to the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event (K-Pg). The leading theory behind the K-Pg event is that a large asteroid brought about the mass extinction of approximately three quarters of all the plant and animal life on Earth. The largest complete T-Rex specimen is located at the Field Museum of Natural History, in Chicago and measures 40 feet in length and stands at 12 feet tall. Based on the bone structure it is estimated 1: The Megalodon The megalodon was one of the most dangerous predators in the sea during the Pliocene and Miocene epochs, around 23 to 2.6 million years ago. Based on the size of the discovered teeth and vertebrae, it was determined that the megalodon’s physical appearance resembled that of today’s great white shark. However, the megalodon was much larger. Based on the fossil evidence and body mass analysis which was done in comparison with that of the great white it was estimated that the length of the megalodon ranged from 55 to 60 meters in length with a weight between 50 and 75 tons. Scientists have not excluded the possibility of certain specimens exceeding these parameters. A 2008 computer simulation determined that the 10.8 to 18.2 ton bite force that this shark could produce was stronger than that of any other animal
Views: 10240303 They will Kill You
Can Apes Really "Talk" To Humans?
 
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What can we learn from the controversial history of ape language research? ↓↓ Links & Info ↓↓ SUBMIT A QUESTION HERE: http://www.npr.org/skunkbear SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dH6fpR TUMBLR: http://skunkbear.tumblr.com/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/NPRskunkbear Contribute to a really cool experiment - see if you can interpret chimpanzee gestures!: http://www.greatapedictionary.com Here's a good overview of the ethical and scientific questions around Kanzi and Koko: http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2014/08/koko_kanzi_and_ape_language_research_criticism_of_working_conditions_and.html Here's Herbert Terrace's famouse Science paper: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/psychology/primatecognitionlab/References/cananapecreateasentence.pdf The contentious back and forth between Terrace and Penny Patterson http://www.nybooks.com/articles/1980/10/09/gorilla-talk/ http://www.nybooks.com/articles/1980/12/04/more-on-monkey-talk-1/ http://www.nybooks.com/articles/1981/04/02/more-on-ape-talk/ http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/j.2326-1951.1982.tb02120.x/abstract One of Terrace's students takes on Patterson's claims: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0093934X79900476 A blistering assessment of Terrace's work from moral philosopher Peter Singer: http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2011/10/13/troubled-life-nim-chimpsky/ Evidence that bonobos have mental representations of words: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10071-007-0086-3 Credits: Produced by Ryan Kellman and Adam Cole (@cadamole) Consultant: Barbara J. King Senior Editors: Alison Richards and Andrea Kissack Supervising Editor: Anne Gudenkauf Canine Liaison: Madeline Kelly Sofia Music: "The Mountain" - Podington Bear (http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Podington_Bear/Rhythm_and_Strings/TheMountain) "The Elusive Word" - Blue Dot Sessions (http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Blue_Dot_Sessions/K2/The_Elusive_Word_1368) "Glorious Day" - Gary Crockett, Jay Glover, Dominic Glover "Every Second Matters" - Elliott Harms "Discoveries" - Elliott Harms "Louisiana Roll" - Walsh SFX from amazing Freesound.org users: nemodaedalus plivesey rivernile7 johannesschimdt
Views: 291516 NPR's Skunk Bear
10 Animal Species That Would Take Over if Humans Died Out
 
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So, it finally happened. The zombies rose up, Putin hit the nuclear button, scientists created a killer virus, Yellowstone super-volcano erupted, and the apes turned on their human masters. The consequence: bang, no more humanity. Just you. The last list-reading human on Earth. →Subscribe for new videos every day! https://www.youtube.com/user/toptenznet?sub_confirmation=1 Find more lists at: http://www.toptenz.net →Top 10 Objects That Were Clearly Invented Just to Annoy Physics: https://youtu.be/0MVGeRa-vLo Entertaining and educational top 10 lists from TopTenzNet! Brand new videos 7 days a week! Subscribe to our Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TopTenz/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theoriginaltoptenz/ Learn more about the host: →Simon's VLOG: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvqt8j7DfPmveJp3UOk9XTg Business inquiries to [email protected] Other TopTenz Videos: Top 10 Mysterious Mass Animal Deaths https://youtu.be/U6_JF2ihuwM?list=PLQ4d2-ByGhnJK_bMEy0hjp9_kB0DUntF- Top 10 Ways Humans Could COLONIZE Space https://youtu.be/J62kX6ubBNA?list=PLQ4d2-ByGhnKNxJ-0WBuO_bl54ynbD6o- Text version: http://www.toptenz.net/10-species-dominate-humans-died.php Coming up: 10. The Rats 9. The Bears 8. The Dogs 7. The Ants 6. The Pigs 5. The Octopi 4. The Racoons 3. The Cockroaches 2. The Apes 1. The Wolbachia Source/Further reading: http://io9.gizmodo.com/5780020/if-humanity-went-extinct-what-species-would-replace-us https://psmag.com/planet-of-the-octopuses-what-animal-species-is-most-likely-to-rise-up-and-overthrow-humans-fd5f15b6bb1c#.e1fjw3e89 http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-36035456 http://www.livescience.com/46866-planet-apes-next-dominant-species.html http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/10/science/10angier.html https://psmag.com/planet-of-the-octopuses-what-animal-species-is-most-likely-to-rise-up-and-overthrow-humans-fd5f15b6bb1c#.i5ezkmlzs https://psmag.com/planet-of-the-octopuses-what-animal-species-is-most-likely-to-rise-up-and-overthrow-humans-fd5f15b6bb1c#.fgzpi38ao http://theweek.com/articles/463960/5-fascinating-reasons-cockroaches-outlive-all http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2011/08/the-science-of-planet-of-the-apes-could-simians-get-scary-smart/243138/ http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150211-whats-the-most-dominant-life-form
Views: 513232 TopTenz
How Many Heartbeats Do We Get?
 
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Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you 😃) . Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/PBSDSDonate Science really gets my heart going… Subscribe: http://bit.ly/iotbs_sub Twitter: @okaytobesmart ↓ More info and sources below ↓ Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/okaytobesmart http://twitter.com/jtotheizzoe Follow on Tumblr: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com Follow on Instagram: http://instagram.com/jtotheizzoe Ever wonder how the heart symbol came to stand for the actual heart? And why do we speak of the heart as the seat of love, when love really happens in our brains? Is it true that animals only get a billion heartbeats? This week, we give you enough cool cardiac science to make your heart skip a beat Origin of the heart symbol: http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/explainer/2006/02/the_shape_of_my_heart.html History of silphium trade: http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/4256173?sid=21105598276993&uid=3739256&uid=3739920&uid=4&uid=2 What causes the pain of heartbreak? http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-causes-chest-pains/ The heartbeat hypothesis: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heartbeat_hypothesis The quarter power scaling principle: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=12877984 http://hep.ucsb.edu/courses/ph6b_99/0111299sci-scaling.html http://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/watkins/longevity.htm Have an idea for an episode or an amazing science question you want answered? Leave a comment below! ----------------- It's Okay To Be Smart is written and hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.DFollow me on Twitter: @jtotheizzoe Email me: itsokaytobesmart AT gmail DOT com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart Google+ https://plus.google.com/+itsokaytobesmart For more awesome science, check out: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com Produced by PBS Digital Studios: http://www.youtube.com/user/pbsdigitalstudios Joe Hanson - Creator/Host/Writer Joe Nicolosi - Director Amanda Fox - Producer, Spotzen IncKate Eads - Associate Producer Andrew Matthews - Editing/Motion Graphics Katie Graham - Director of Photography John Knudsen - Gaffer Dalton Allen - Post-Production Intern Theme music: "Ouroboros" by Kevin MacLeod Other music via APM Stock images from Shutterstock ----------------- Last week's video: What is Déjà Vu? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ut8mYGi0YRs More videos: Why Are Some People Left-Handed? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPvMUpcxPSA Why Did We Blow on NES Games? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Gf9mtXnJfM The Science of Game of Thrones - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Utu-LpJn3Is There Was No First Human - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xdWLhXi24Mo How The Elements Got Their Names - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtg9p6A6xnY
Views: 396089 It's Okay To Be Smart
Is Most Published Research Wrong?
 
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Mounting evidence suggests a lot of published research is false. Check out Audible: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe Support Veritasium on Patreon: http://bit.ly/VePatreon Patreon supporters: Bryan Baker, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Jason Buster, Saeed Alghamdi More information on this topic: http://wke.lt/w/s/z0wmO The Preregistration Challenge: https://cos.io/prereg/ Resources used in the making of this video: Why Most Published Research Findings Are False: http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.0020124 Trouble at the Lab: http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21588057-scientists-think-science-self-correcting-alarming-degree-it-not-trouble Science isn't broken: http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/science-isnt-broken/#part1 Visual effects by Gustavo Rosa
Views: 1810628 Veritasium
Two New Sauropods Generate Excitement and Controversy | SciShow News
 
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One new fossil discovery helps shed some light on early titanosaur evolution, while another leads to some controversial claims about dicraeosaurs. Hosted by: Stefan Chin SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It's called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at https://www.scishowtangents.org ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Greg, Alex Schuerch, Alex Hackman, Andrew Finley Brenan, Sam Lutfi, D.A. Noe, الخليفي سلطان, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Patrick D. Ashmore, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Chris Peters ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0211412 https://www.eurekalert.org/emb_releases/2019-02/p-ent020719.php http://science.sciencemag.org/content/284/5423/2137 http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/diapsids/saurischia/sauropoda.html https://www.britannica.com/animal/titanosaur https://www.britannica.com/place/Gondwana-supercontinent https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1464343X09001605 http://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/dino-directory/dicraeosaurus.html https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-37943-3 http://museum.wa.gov.au/explore/dinosaur-discovery/amargasaurus https://www.jstor.org/stable/1306608?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents https://svpow.com/2009/10/08/small-african-primate-possibly-sheds-light-on-soft-tissue-morphology-of-cretaceous-diplodocoid/ https://www.britannica.com/animal/potto https://www.nationalgeographic.com.au/science/why-today-is-the-golden-age-for-dinosaur-discoveries.aspx Image Sources: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d0/Amargasaurus1_Melb_Museum_email.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dicraeosauridae_Scale.svg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Amargasaurus.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2011_Trampeltier_1528.JPG https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bosmans_potto_skeleton.JPG https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Perodicticus_potto_-_Royal_Museum_for_Central_Africa_-_DSC06787.JPG https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/titanosaurus-gm623450674-109352071 https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/tyrannosaurus-rex-gm182492703-12223949 https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/macrophotograph-of-a-fern-gm1018660222-273819465 https://www.istockphoto.com/vector/americas-mountain-and-water-system-gm872979294-243818615 https://www.istockphoto.com/vector/map-of-africa-1874-gm478490478-67830975 https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/dicraeosaurus-dinosaur-walking-3d-render-gm178792074-25018964 https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/tanzania-gm163113174-22788525 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-37943-3#Fig1 After Effects must have keyframes selected from one layer in order to export them as text. https://www.istockphoto.com/vector/amargasaurus-dinosaur-head-gm664343692-120905351 https://www.istockphoto.com/vector/vector-flat-linear-illustration-in-blue-colors-online-dating-app-concept-gm891242518-246831676 https://www.istockphoto.com/photo/dicraeosaurus-dinosaur-drinking-3d-render-gm162906704-23230840 https://www.videoblocks.com/video/time-travel-tunnel-bvrnmsvl-j5mpt0zf https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-02/ou-ndw020619.php
Views: 120357 SciShow