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Government Regulation: Crash Course Government and Politics #47
 
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Today, we’re going to wrap up our discussion of economic policy by looking at government regulation. We're going to talk about the government's goals for the U.S. economy and the policies it employs to achieve those goals. Ever since the New Deal, we've seen an increased role of the government within the economy - even with the deregulation initiatives of President Carter and Reagan in the 80's. Now this is all pretty controversial and we're going to talk about it, as this is a long way from the federal government handed down by the framers of the constitution. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 212685 CrashCourse
Business and Government Regulations - Impact on Business
 
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The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business adjunct instructor, Lance Schneier, explains regulations and how they impact business in the U.S. and Ohio. Featured on ONN's Ohio Means Business.
Natural Monopoly and the need for Government Regulation
 
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Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 81120 Jason Welker
Government Regulation : Goals and Consequences
 
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George Stigler and Mark Green discuss the intentions of different government agencies along with the consequences of establishing them incorrectly.
Remove The Cost of Compliance With Government Regulation of The Ten Essentials
 
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Views: 1560 Lankasri News
Elon Musk on Artificial Intelligence and Government Regulation
 
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From the ISS R&D Conference on July 19, 2017, Elon Musk was asked by a government worker how they should go about tackling artificial intelligence. *********************************************************************** Ramble's Books to Read Before You Die, Part 1(August) 1. "If you want to induce an existential crisis", click http://amzn.to/2fHe5no 2. "If you want to experience PTSD, without actually having PTSD", click http://amzn.to/2vzcLZC 3. "Alternate Title: 'How to Take Over the World'", click http://amzn.to/2vDjdx0 *********************************************************************** Thanks for watching, subscribe for more! Disclaimers: This video is quoted under Fair Use for educational purposes. We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
Views: 1162 Ramble
Economically Speaking: Government Regulation (B1208) - Full Video
 
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Produced and Telecast by PBS in 1978, this is one of the rare TV appearances of Nobel Prize winner George Stigler. Also appearing on this half hour production is a young Mark Green, near the beginning of his career as a consumer advocate. Their discussion is moderated by Marina von Neumann Whitman, then a Professor of Economics at the University of Pittsburgh. Until 2002 it was thought no recording of this program existed, until found in a stack of poorly labeled film copies of the “Economically Speaking” series. ©1978 30 min. Check out our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/FreeToChooseNetwork Visit our media website to find other programs here: http://freetochoosemedia.org/index.php Connect with us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/FreeToChooseNet Learn more about our company here: http://freetochoosenetwork.org Shop for related products here: http://www.freetochoose.net Stream from FreeToChoose.TV here: http://freetochoose.tv
Government Regulation Stifles Innovation
 
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There has been lots of innovation recently in areas without regulation—heavily regulated fields like transportation, health care, and energy have been much slower to progress. Question: Will technology reshape capitalism in the future? Peter Thiel: Technology and capitalism are very much linked.  I would frame the link a little differently.  I think that capitalism probably works best in a technologically progressing society.  In the developed world, technological progress means that you can have a situation where -- where people -- where there's growth, where there's a way in which everybody can be better off over time. If you have technological progress, that will encourage more capitalist system.  On the other hand, if you don't, if things are stalled, you end up with much more of a zero sum type thing, where there's no progress and basically everybody's gain is somebody else's loss.  And that, I think, tends to encourage a much less capitalist system, and that's where you sort of get a you know, what are often called a bull market in politics, but politics becomes more important, people become more interested in using the government to get things for their particular interest group and the whole thing can sort of spiral downwards instead of -- and become a vicious cycle where more government regulation leads to less technology, leads to demand for even more politics to redistribute the pie that's no longer growing. We have seen technological progress in the last few decades in computers, the internet, and we've seen a lot less in areas like transportation.  So you know the fastest airplanes was the Concord in 1970 they've gotten slower over the last 40 years.  Medicine, healthcare has seen some progress but it's been pretty limited the last 20 years where the development of new drugs and treatment seems to be badly stalled.  Energy is an area where there's been very limited progress and the actual cost of oil was $3.00 a barrel in 1973, and today it's around $85 a barrel, even inflation adjusted, the real prices have gone up because somehow we have not been making enough progress in developing the technologies for alternative and cheaper types of energy.  As a Libertarian, I tend to think it's interesting at least that a lot of these sectors correlate with places where there's heavy government regulation.  A government is not regulated -- the computer industry where the internet they thought that, you know, Bill Gates working with his computer in his parent's garage was not a really interesting or important thing, not worthy of scrutiny or regulation.  It didn't matter.  That's been the same perspective people had, by and large had with respect to the internet since the mid-90's and so we've had a lot of progress and innovation there. Health care on the other had has been subject to massive regulation and strangely had the most progress in some ways where you have cheaper treatments at better quality in things like cosmetic surgery and things like that which are less regulated and again deemed to be unimportant by the government.  So I think the regulatory load on technology has gotten to be quite high and there is this very important question of how much progress we're likely to see in the next few decades. From my perspective, the critical thing is actually to figure out a way to get the technology engine restarted.  I think that we would like to have less government regulations to enable that.  And if it gets restarted, you can have a more capitalist-type system.  But I do think that if technology is stalled out, we will probably see at some point a resumption of the trend toward more government even though it's more unlikely, in my opinion, to fix things. Recorded November 15, 2010Interviewed by Victoria Brown Directed / Produced by Jonathan Fowler
Views: 2321 Big Think
Reasons for and against Government intervention
 
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FACEBOOK PAGE - https://www.facebook.com/MultiplexinggamerTutorials Tutorial on the reasons for and against Government intervention in an economy. Goes into some detail about Frederick Hayek and John Maynard Keynes. Forms a good basis for the AQA Econ 1 Markets and Market failure 25 mark essay.
Views: 37309 Economics Alex
Reviewing Government Regulations On Business
 
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New Hampshire's state government may review all regulations on business.
Views: 124 WMUR-TV
Labor & Government Regulations
 
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This video is about Labor & Government Regulations
Views: 20 Nicole Reagan
Media Regulation: Crash Course Government and Politics #45
 
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Today we wrap up our discussion of the media by talking about how the government interacts with and influences the content we see. Now it may be easy to assume that because we live in a free-market capitalist society, the only real regulation of the media is determined by the consumers, but this isn’t necessarily true. The government controls a number of factors including the potential for lawsuits, spectrum licensing, FCC fines, and has even tried to pass a bit of legislation. So we’ll talk about how all of these factors influence the media and end with a discussion of a pretty hotly debated topic these days - net neutrality. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 204592 CrashCourse
Government Regulation!
 
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An entry for the EPA's Rulemaking Matters contest.
Views: 361 PoliticsMyWay1
How Government Regulations Affect Small Businesses
 
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Docudrama for AP economics: This is a brief analysis of our opinion on government regulations and how it affects America, mainly targeted towards small businesses, but some examples of large corporations are included. This was done as a school project in less than a weekend, interviews included are not to be taken seriously since these are not professionals in any way. Thank you for watching!
Views: 137 David Munoz
Monetary and Fiscal Policy: Crash Course Government and Politics #48
 
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Today, Craig is going to dive into the controversy of monetary and fiscal policy. Monetary and fiscal policy are ways the government, and most notably the Federal Reserve, influences the economy - for better or for worse. So we’re going to start by looking at monetary policy, and specifically how the Federal Reserve uses interests rates as a means of controlling (or at least attempting to control) inflation. We’ll then move onto fiscal policy - that is the government’s use of taxation to raise and spend money. It’s all, well, pretty controversial, but as it seems Americans hate taxes the most, monetary policy is most often used - meaning that the Federal Reserve plays a hugely significant role in steering the U.S. economy. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 405980 CrashCourse
Market Economy: Crash Course Government and Politics #46
 
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Today, we’re going to take a look at how the government plays a role in the economy. Specifically, the way the government creates and maintains our market economic system. Now sure, the government’s role in the economy can be controversial, some may even say completely unnecessary. But there are some deficiencies in a free market, and we’re going to look at those, and the tools the government uses to combat those issues in maintaining a healthy and stable economy. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 318445 CrashCourse
Government regulation: Where do we go from here? (1977) | ARCHIVES
 
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December 19, 1977: This AEI Public Policy Forum deals with the growth of government regulation, which has stimulated increasing debate in recent years in academic, political, and public policy circles. The issues discussed here range from the practical implementation of given policy objectives to the philosophical basis on which these objectives are decided. Some argue that to improve regulatory activities, a total reassessment of government's role in the private economy is required. Others maintain that past shortcomings result from poorly coordinated government policies. Thus, future policies turn on a consideration of economic incentives and other means of attaining regulatory goals and on a rational assessment of the costs and benefits of each regulatory activity. Panelists: John C. Danforth — Senator (R-Missouri) William Proxmire — Senator (D-Wisconsin) Paul W. MacAvoy — professor of economics at Yale University Harrison Welford — executive associate director for reorganization and management of the Office of Management and Budget Moderator: John Charles Daly Host: Peter Hackes In 1977, transcripts were available by mail for a small fee. Today, they're available to you for free at this link: https://goo.gl/M3uW7W Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Music credit: BY – "synthwave" by places https://goo.gl/BwJKUt Music marked "BY" is used under Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/ Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #economy #economics #budget #regulation #law
Usury: Government Regulation of Interest
 
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Usury is a legal term describing a civil or criminal wrong of charging interest in excess of the limit allowed by law. The following is a link to the New Mexico Attorney General's web site: http://www.nmag.gov/office/ConsumerInfo/default.aspx Use authoritative sources when performing research. Business English
Views: 1460 etramway
Government Regulation of Healthcare and Cost
 
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Regulatory and funding factors influencing healthcare cost - an introduction
Views: 186 doctorbillphil
Do CORPORATE Regulations Justify GOVERNMENT Existence? | Larken Rose
 
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Help fight the cause for TRUTH and FREEDOM through all the effort put in this channel. Every cent counts. My Paypal 🔃 Patreon ➤ https://www.patreon.com/AMP3083 ➤ https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=V9GYRTJ253YS4 ✔ My BITCHUTE Channel: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/amp3083/
Views: 420 AMP3083
How a Bill Becomes a Law: Crash Course Government and Politics #9
 
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Oh my, Craig has his work cut out for him this week. The process of how a bill becomes a law can be pretty complex, fraught with potential bill-death at every corner. As if just getting through committee isn’t difficult enough, bills have to navigate a series of amendments and votes in both houses, potentially more committees, further compromise bills, and even more floor votes, just to end up on the chopping block of the president. And then in one fell swoop the president can stop a bill in its tracks with a veto! But then again, a presidential veto isn’t necessarily a bill’s end either. As you can see we’ve got to lot to cover, and we’ll be the first to admit this has been covered before, and extraordinarily well might we add, by the folks at School House Rock. But we’ll give it our best shot - without the singing of course. Well, not too much singing anyway. Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org This episode is sponsored by Squarespace: http://www.squarespace.com/crashcourse Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1017190 CrashCourse
Visible Hands: Government Regulation and International Business Responsibility
 
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A growing number of states are regulating the corporate social responsibility (CSR) of domestic multinational corporations relating to overseas subsidiaries and suppliers. Jette Steen Knudsen presents a new framework for analysing government–CSR relations: direct and indirect policies for CSR. Find out more about the event: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/events/2018/feb/visible-hands-government-regulation-and-international-business-responsibility
Views: 121 UCL LAWS
Government regulations will be net positive for Facebook: Market research pro
 
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Tony Romm, tech policy reporter with The Washington Post, and Stefanie Miller, senior vice president at Height Capital Markets, break down Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's call for more tech regulation from the government. » Subscribe to CNBC: http://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: http://www.cnbc.com/ Find CNBC News on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Google+: http://cnb.cx/PlusCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: http://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC #CNBC
Views: 207 CNBC Television
The Impact of Government Regulations on Healthcare Cost Management
 
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William Bercik, Director of Healthcare for Oracle, and a former CFO of a hospital, talks about allocating healthcare costs and the need for a tool that uncovers indirect costs. Government regulations have had an enormous impact on the healthcare industry. Both provider and health plan organizations are feeling the pressure of the ever-changing healthcare landscape. The shift from fee for service has placed an increased emphasis on cost control and patient profitability at the service line is becoming best practice. Healthcare organization need to have access to revenue, cost and clinical quality analytics in order to have a better understanding of their costs and meet Government regulations. The Perficient High-Performance Costing Expressway provides healthcare executives with an automated and transparent costing model that shows profitability by service line, patient and procedure.
Views: 1450 Perficient, Inc.
Bitcoin craze continues despite government regulation
 
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비트코인 열풍, 정부규제 및 문제점들 It's been an amazing year for those who got in early on cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. Many Koreans have. This country is the third biggest market for cryptos. But that fact has the Korean government worried about a huge bubble... and it's planning to step in and regulate it. Kim Hyesung has the details. Bitcoin has surged more than 15 fold in value since the start of the year. Trading the virtual currency has become so popular in South Korea that on any given day the country accounts for more than one fifth of the global bitcoin trade, and is the world's third largest market in trading the virtual currency. (standup): mark "More than one million people in the country are believed to hold at least some Bitcoin, equivalent to one out of every 50 citizens. And concerns over a market bubble or a cyberattack from North Korea have prompted the South Korean government to announce a series of measures to regulate virtual currency transactions." The government said it will ban minors, foreigners and financial institutions from investing in cryptocurrencies, and adopt a stricter identification process that will allow only one account per person. It's also looking into taxing virtual currency transactions and profits. (Korean) "There are many murky areas when it comes to virtual currency trading. There is no clear information on the issuer or holder, and it's not yet defined as a good or a currency. There have been several cases of hacking into bitcoin exchanges in Japan, South Korea and the U.S. that have led to losses of hundreds of millions of dollars. But there is no one to take responsibility, and no way for bitcoin users to be compensated, for any losses." Created in 2009 by an unknown person or group using the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto, bitcoin is traded anonymously on a decentralized network of computers. The virtual currency has seen its price surge this year, but according to AQR Capital Management, only 1000 people hold 40% of the world's bitcoin, meaning the market is vulnerable to a sudden crash. To catch up with cryptocurrency trading, regulators in the world are racing to come up with stricter laws. China and South Korea made it illegal for companies to raise funds by issuing virtual tokens. And the EU agreed on December 15th to adopt stricter measures to identify users and prevent money laundering and fraud. But despite these governments' attempts to dampen investor interests, at least in South Korea, people are still paying a premium to invest in bitcoin and cryptocurrencies, hoping they will continue their dizzying rise. Kim Hyesung, Arirang News. Arirang News Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtvnews ------------------------------------------------------------ [Subscribe Arirang Official YouTube] ARIRANG TV: http://www.youtube.com/arirang ARIRANG RADIO: http://www.youtube.com/Music180Arirang ARIRANG NEWS: http://www.youtube.com/arirangnews ARIRANG K-POP: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld ARIRANG ISSUE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangtoday ARIRANG CULTURE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangkorean ------------------------------------------------------------ [Visit Arirang TV Official Pages] Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtv Twitter: http://twitter.com/arirangworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/arirangworld Homepage: http://www.arirang.com ------------------------------------------------------------ [Arirang K-Pop] YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangkpop Google+: http://plus.google.com/+arirangworld
Views: 128 ARIRANG NEWS
Christians: Government regulation and tax laws protect your good name
 
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Christians, if you want your religion to stop being compared to a scam you must accept the hard truth that 501c3 rules should be enforced for all churches Religious tax laws are there to protect you, not oppress you. Twitter @Anubis2814 Also please support me on patreon https://www.patreon.com/Anubis2814 https://anubis2814.wordpress.com/
Views: 218 anubis2814
Market Failures, Taxes, and Subsidies: Crash Course Economics #21
 
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This week on Crash Course Econ, Jacob and Adriene are talking about failure. Specifically, we're talking about market failures. When markets don't provide a good or service efficiently, that's a market failure. When markets fail, often governments step in to provide those services. Stuff like public education or military protection are good examples of market failures. So, what are some of the ways governments address, market failures? Well, it's funny you should ask, as we also talk about that in this episode. We'll get into taxes and subsidies and externalities and a bunch of other important stuff this week on Crash Course Econ. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 671856 CrashCourse
Social Policy: Crash Course Government and Politics #49
 
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Today, Craig is going to talk about social policy - in the United States this means achieving one of three goals: protecting Americans from risk, promoting equal opportunity, or assisting the poor. Many Americans strongly believe in individualism, that is self-reliance, but since the Great Depression and the New Deal the government’s role has increased significantly. We’re going to focus on two social policies that came out of the New Deal - Social Security and what we tend to think of as “welfare” - and talk about why they’re still around now and potentially the future. These and other social policies are not without controversy, as things tend to be when involving our tax dollars, and we’re going to talk about that too. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudiosSupport is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.orgAll attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 252545 CrashCourse
What is GOVERNMENT FAILURE? What does GOVERNMENT FAILURE mean? GOVERNMENT FAILURE meaning
 
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What is GOVERNMENT FAILURE? What does GOVERNMENT FAILURE mean? GOVERNMENT FAILURE meaning - GOVERNMENT FAILURE definition - GOVERNMENT FAILURE explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In the context of public economics, as a perspective on the market efficiency impacts of government regulation, government failure (or non-market failure) is imperfection in government performance, as viewed primarily through a free market economic lens (with less emphasis placed on concomitant social policy objectives). The phrase "government failure" emerged as a term of art in the early 1960s with the rise of intellectual and political criticism of government regulations. Building on the premise that the only legitimate rationale for government regulation was market failure, economists advanced new theories arguing that government interventions in markets were costly and tend to fail. For example, it was argued that government failure occurs when government intervention causes a more inefficient allocation of goods and resources than would occur without that intervention. In not comparing realized inadequacies of market outcomes against those of potential interventions, one writer describes the "anatomy" of market failure as providing "only limited help in prescribing therapies for government success". Government failures, however, also occur whenever the government performs inadequately, including when it fails to intervene or does not intervene sufficiently. Some use the phrase "passive government failure" to describe the government's failure to intervene in a market failure that would result in a socially preferable mix of output. Just as with market failures, there are different kinds of government failures that describe corresponding economic distortions. An early use of "government failure" was by Ronald Coase (1964) in comparing an actual and ideal system of industrial regulation: Contemplation of an optimal system may provide techniques of analysis that would otherwise have been missed and, in certain special cases, it may go far to providing a solution. But in general its influence has been pernicious. It has directed economists’ attention away from the main question, which is how alternative arrangements will actually work in practice. It has led economists to derive conclusions for economic policy from a study of an abstract of a market situation. It is no accident that in the literature...we find a category "market failure" but no category "government failure." Until we realize that we are choosing between social arrangements which are all more or less failures, we are not likely to make much headway. Roland McKean used the term in 1965 to suggest limitations on an invisible-hand notion of government behavior. More formal and general analysis followed in such areas as development economics, ecological economics, political science, political economy, public choice theory, and transaction-cost economics. The idea of government failure is associated with the policy argument that, even if particular markets may not meet the standard conditions of perfect competition required to ensure social optimality, government intervention may make matters worse rather than better. Just as a market failure is not a failure to bring a particular or favored solution into existence at desired prices but is rather a problem which prevents the market from operating efficiently, a government failure is not a failure of the government to bring about a particular solution but is rather a systemic problem which prevents an efficient government solution to a problem. The problem to be solved need not be a market failure; sometimes, some voters may prefer a governmental solution even when a market solution is possible. Government failure can be on both the demand side and the supply side. Demand-side failures include preference-revelation problems and the illogics of voting and collective behaviour. Supply-side failures largely result from principal–agent problem.
Views: 247 The Audiopedia
Government Writes 80,000 Pages of Regulations Per Year
 
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Regulation Nation Cliff Asness of AQR Capital Management on the pros and cons of government regulation.
Views: 616 StosselOnFBN
Bitcoin craze continues despite government regulation
 
02:39
비트코인 열풍, 정부규제 및 문제점들 2017 has been an amazing year for those who got in early on cryptocurrencies. Many Koreans have. This country is the world's third biggest market. More reasons for the government concerned about a bubble to step in. Kim Hyesung dissect the plans to get things under control and the challenges ahead. Bitcoin has surged more than 15 fold in value since the start of the year. Trading the virtual currency has become so popular in South Korea that on any given day the country accounts for more than one fifth of the global bitcoin trade, and is the world's third largest market in trading the virtual currency. (standup): mark "More than one million people in the country are believed to hold at least some Bitcoin, equivalent to one out of every 50 citizens. And concerns over a market bubble or a cyberattack from North Korea have prompted the South Korean government to announce a series of measures to regulate virtual currency transactions." The government said it will ban minors, foreigners and financial institutions from investing in cryptocurrencies, and adopt a stricter identification process that will allow only one account per person. It's also looking into taxing virtual currency transactions and profits. (Korean) "There are many murky areas when it comes to virtual currency trading. There is no clear information on the issuer or holder, and it's not yet defined as a good or a currency. There have been several cases of hacking into bitcoin exchanges in Japan, South Korea and the U.S. that have led to losses of hundreds of millions of dollars. But there is no one to take responsibility, and no way for bitcoin users to be compensated, for any losses." Created in 2009 by an unknown person or group using the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto, bitcoin is traded anonymously on a decentralized network of computers. The virtual currency has seen its price surge this year, but according to AQR Capital Management, only 1000 people hold 40% of the world's bitcoin, meaning the market is vulnerable to a sudden crash. To catch up with cryptocurrency trading, regulators in the world are racing to come up with stricter laws. China and South Korea made it illegal for companies to raise funds by issuing virtual tokens. And the EU agreed on December 15th to adopt stricter measures to identify users and prevent money laundering and fraud. But despite these governments' attempts to dampen investor interests, at least in South Korea, people are still paying a premium to invest in bitcoin and cryptocurrencies, hoping they will continue their dizzying rise. Kim Hyesung, Arirang News. Arirang News Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtvnews ------------------------------------------------------------ [Subscribe Arirang Official YouTube] ARIRANG TV: http://www.youtube.com/arirang ARIRANG RADIO: http://www.youtube.com/Music180Arirang ARIRANG NEWS: http://www.youtube.com/arirangnews ARIRANG K-POP: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld ARIRANG ISSUE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangtoday ARIRANG CULTURE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangkorean ------------------------------------------------------------ [Visit Arirang TV Official Pages] Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtv Twitter: http://twitter.com/arirangworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/arirangworld Homepage: http://www.arirang.com ------------------------------------------------------------ [Arirang K-Pop] YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangkpop Google+: http://plus.google.com/+arirangworld
Views: 139 ARIRANG NEWS
Election Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #36
 
08:46
This week Craig is going to give you a broad overview of elections in the United States. So as you may have noticed, there are kind of a lot of people in the U.S, and holding individual issues up to a public vote doesn't seem particularly plausible. So to deal with this complexity, we vote for people, not policies, that represent our best interests. But as you'll see, this process was not thoroughly addressed in the Constitution, so there have been a number of amendments and laws at the state level implemented to create the election system we all know and (maybe) love today. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 453734 CrashCourse
Less Government, Less Regulations, Less Taxes
 
05:54
What this really means.
Views: 722 PoliticVic
What is GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY? What does GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY mean?
 
05:32
What is GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY? What does GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY mean? GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY meaning - GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY definition - GOVERNMENT-GRANTED MONOPOLY explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In economics, a government-granted monopoly (also called a "de jure monopoly") is a form of coercive monopoly by which a government grants exclusive privilege to a private individual or firm to be the sole provider of a good or service; potential competitors are excluded from the market by law, regulation, or other mechanisms of government enforcement. As a form of coercive monopoly, government-granted monopoly is contrasted with a non-coercive monopoly or an efficiency monopoly, where there is no competition but it is not forcibly excluded. Amongst forms of coercive monopoly it is distinguished from government monopoly or state monopoly (in which government agencies hold the legally enforced monopoly rather than private individuals or firms) and from government-sponsored cartels (in which the government forces several independent producers to partially coordinate their decisions through a centralized organization). Advocates for government-granted monopolies often claim that they ensure a degree of public control over essential industries, without having those industries actually run by the state. Opponents often criticize them as political favors to corporations. Government-granted monopolies may be opposed by those who would prefer free markets as well as by those who would prefer to replace private corporations with public ownership. Under mercantilist economic systems, European governments with colonial interests often granted large and extremely lucrative monopolies to companies trading in particular regions, such as the Dutch East India Company. Today, government-granted monopolies may be found in public utility services such as public roads, mail, water supply, and electric power, as well as certain specialized and highly regulated fields such as education and gambling. In many countries lucrative natural resources industries, especially the petroleum industry, are controlled by government-granted monopolies. Franchises granted by governments to operate public transit through public roads are another example. A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a state or national government to an inventor or his/her assignee for a limited period of time in exchange for a public disclosure of an invention. The procedure for granting patents, the requirements placed on the patentee, and the extent of the exclusive rights vary widely between countries according to national laws and international agreements. Typically, however, a patent application must include one or more claims defining the invention which must be new, inventive, and useful or industrially applicable. In many countries, certain subject areas are excluded from patents, such as business methods and mental acts. The exclusive right granted to a patentee in most countries is the right to prevent others from making, using, selling, or distributing the patented invention without permission. Copyright is a legal right created by the law of a country that grants the creator of an original work exclusive rights for its use and distribution. This is usually only for a limited time. The exclusive rights are not absolute but limited by limitations and exceptions to copyright law, including fair use. A major limitation on copyright is that copyright protects only the original expression of ideas, and not the underlying ideas themselves. A trademark or trade mark is a distinctive sign or indicator used by an individual, business organization, or other legal entity to identify that the products or services to consumers with which the trademark appears originate from a unique source, and to distinguish its products or services from those of other entities. Trademarks can act as a form of consumer protection that lowers the transaction costs between a buyer and seller who are not personally acquainted.....
Views: 251 The Audiopedia
Freedom of Speech: Crash Course Government and Politics #25
 
06:52
Today, FINALLY, Craig is going to talk about Free Speech! Now, free speech is so important because it not only allows you to critique the government, but it also protects you from the government. But it's essential to remember that not ALL speech is protected equally under the First Amendment, and just because you have a right to free speech doesn't mean your employer, for instance, can't fire you for something you say (unless your work for the government and then things get a bit more complicated). So we'll take a look at a couple significant Supreme Court cases that have gotten us to our current definition of free speech, and we'll also discuss some of the more controversial aspects of free speech - like hate speech. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 576543 CrashCourse
Monopolies and Anti-Competitive Markets: Crash Course Economics #25
 
10:17
What is a monopoly? It turns out, it's more than just a board game. It's a terrible, terrible economic practice in which giant corporations dominate markets and hurt consumers. Except when it isn't. In some industries, monopolies are the most efficient way to do business. Utilities like electricity, water, and broadband internet access are probably less efficiently delivered in competitive markets. Come along, and let us monopolize your attention for a few minutes. You might learn something. And you might land on Free Parking. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 517947 CrashCourse
Government Regulation = Death
 
02:39
http://thehossusmc.com/ http://www.facebook.com/pages/TheHossUSMC/107385756065898 https://twitter.com/#!/thehossusmc
Views: 623 DomariNolo1775
Freedom of the Press: Crash Course Government and Politics #26
 
07:17
Today, Craig is going to finish up our discussion of the First Amendment with freedom of the press. Like an individual's right to free speech, the press has a right, and arguably responsibility, to tell the public what the government is doing. But of course there are some complications in doing so, like if that information will compromise national security or wrongfully discredit an individual. When considering Edward Snowden's NSA disclosures or Julian Assange's Wikileaks, it's just as important as ever to understand the role of the press in informing the public as well as our role as citizens in staying informed. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 362250 CrashCourse
Trump signs executive order to block new government regulations
 
02:42
Trump signs executive order to block new government regulations. President Donald Trump has signed a new executive order mandating that for each new government regulation being enacted, two need to be revoked. The order is in line with the new president’s plan to slash regulations by as much as 75 percent, as Trump believes the expanding body of government rules is stifling the US economy. “We’re cutting regulations massively for small business – and for large business,” Trump said, signing the document. “This will be the biggest such act that our country has ever seen.” The White House sets aside a budget for regulations each year. Monday’s measure specifies the 2017 regulations budget as $0.
Views: 743 Real Thing TV
VCE Media - Agency & Control - Government Regulation
 
32:39
The Classification Board as an example of Australian government regulation. Examples and issues that it raises as well as an evaluation of its strengths and weaknesses.
Views: 176 Charlie Dyring
The Maddy Report- California 2011 Part 5 Economy and Government Regulation
 
04:41
Newly elected Governor Jerry Brown is warning Californians to be prepared for a "tough budget for tough times.His comments come as no surprise to those who have been warning that California has been living beyond its means since the go-go days of the dot-com boom pushed state revenues to unsustainable levels.Now, the State's $1.7 trillion economy is crippled by a severe recession and the one time budget gimmicks that have papered over the problem in the past are no longer available. Expectations are that 2011 will usher in further deep cuts to education and social services and less generous pensions, as well as a push to unload of many current state responsibilities onto local governments. As a result, the politics of the future may be fought at the local level, as the State tosses the hot potato decisions to either cut services or increase taxes to mayors and city councils. Can Gov. Brown, who has pledged to cut spending, reform pensions, give more authority to local governments and ease regulations, enact such plans in the face of reluctant Democrats and suspicious Republicans? And how will these changes impact issues important to the San Joaquin Valley like water, high speed rail and economic growth? We will discuss the Political Outlook in California for 2011—and how it is likely to impact the San Joaquin Valley—with folks from the region's leading newspapers.Jim Boren, the editorial page editor of the Fresno Bee,Dianne Hardisty, former editorial page editor of the Bakersfield Californian, Paul Hurley, the editorial page editor of the Visalia Times Delta, and Judy Sly, the editorial page editor of the Modesto Bee In part 5, the panel discusses the California Economy and how government regulations play a role.
Views: 349 TheMaddyInstitute
Jonathan Fox on Government Regulation of Religions
 
02:30
For more on this event, visit: http://bit.ly/1hTadqb For a full length video of this event, visit: http://bit.ly/1nUiScY For more on the Berkley Center, visit: http://berkleycenter.georgetown.edu February 11, 2014 | Until at least the 1980s, the dominant academic paradigm—secularization theory—predicted that religion would disappear or at least decline significantly. Yet it is increasingly clear that this has not occurred. Jonathan Fox developed and tested the secular-religious competition perspective, which posits that currently secular and religious actors compete to influence state religion policy. He also compared and contrasted this theory with other prominent theories on religion and politics. The Berkley Center's Jocelyne Cesari moderated the discussion. Jonathan Fox Jonathan Fox is professor at Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel. He specializes in the influence of religion on politics, using both quantitative and qualitative methodology to analyze the impact of religion on domestic conflict, international relations. Fox was part of the Templeton Foundation-funded Religion and State project from 2008 to 2011, which collected and analyzed data on government involvement in religion. Since 2001, he has been a research fellow at Bar-Ilan's Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies, becoming a senior research fellow in 2004. He has also worked on the Minorities at Risk and State Failure projects. Fox is the author or editor of several books and over fifty research articles and book chapters, including Political Secularism, Religion, and the State: A Time Series Analysis of Worldwide Data (forthcoming) and Religion in International Relations Theory: Interactions and Possibilities (2013, with Nukhet Sandal). He received his B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis and Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. Jocelyne Cesari Jocelyne Cesari is a senior fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs and visiting associate professor in the Department of Government. A renowned scholar of Islam and Middle Eastern politics, she also directs the "Islam in the West" program at Harvard University and the Berkley Center's Islam in World Politics program.
Views: 445 Berkley Center
Should the government regulate social media companies?
 
06:49
Barron’s associate publisher Jack Otter and Disruptive Tech Research Founder Lou Basenese on Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey’s and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s testimony to Congress.
Views: 2482 Fox Business
Bitcoin craze continues despite government regulation
 
02:39
비트코인 열풍, 정부규제 및 문제점들 2017 has been an amazing year for those who got in early on cryptocurrencies. Many Koreans have. This country is the world's third biggest market. More reasons for the government concerned about a bubble to step in. Kim Hyesung introduces to us the plans get things under control. Bitcoin has surged more than 15 fold in value since the start of the year. Trading the virtual currency has become so popular in South Korea that on any given day the country accounts for more than one fifth of the global bitcoin trade, and is the world's third largest market in trading the virtual currency. (standup): mark "More than one million people in the country are believed to hold at least some Bitcoin, equivalent to one out of every 50 citizens. And concerns over a market bubble or a cyberattack from North Korea have prompted the South Korean government to announce a series of measures to regulate virtual currency transactions." The government said it will ban minors, foreigners and financial institutions from investing in cryptocurrencies, and adopt a stricter identification process that will allow only one account per person. It's also looking into taxing virtual currency transactions and profits. (Korean) "There are many murky areas when it comes to virtual currency trading. There is no clear information on the issuer or holder, and it's not yet defined as a good or a currency. There have been several cases of hacking into bitcoin exchanges in Japan, South Korea and the U.S. that have led to losses of hundreds of millions of dollars. But there is no one to take responsibility, and no way for bitcoin users to be compensated, for any losses." Created in 2009 by an unknown person or group using the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto, bitcoin is traded anonymously on a decentralized network of computers. The virtual currency has seen its price surge this year, but according to AQR Capital Management, only 1000 people hold 40% of the world's bitcoin, meaning the market is vulnerable to a sudden crash. To catch up with cryptocurrency trading, regulators in the world are racing to come up with stricter laws. China and South Korea made it illegal for companies to raise funds by issuing virtual tokens. And the EU agreed on December 15th to adopt stricter measures to identify users and prevent money laundering and fraud. But despite these governments' attempts to dampen investor interests, at least in South Korea, people are still paying a premium to invest in bitcoin and cryptocurrencies, hoping they will continue their dizzying rise. Kim Hyesung, Arirang News. Arirang News Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtvnews ------------------------------------------------------------ [Subscribe Arirang Official YouTube] ARIRANG TV: http://www.youtube.com/arirang ARIRANG RADIO: http://www.youtube.com/Music180Arirang ARIRANG NEWS: http://www.youtube.com/arirangnews ARIRANG K-POP: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld ARIRANG ISSUE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangtoday ARIRANG CULTURE: http://www.youtube.com/arirangkorean ------------------------------------------------------------ [Visit Arirang TV Official Pages] Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangtv Twitter: http://twitter.com/arirangworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/arirangworld Homepage: http://www.arirang.com ------------------------------------------------------------ [Arirang K-Pop] YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/arirangworld Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/arirangkpop Google+: http://plus.google.com/+arirangworld
Views: 138 ARIRANG NEWS
Business Ethics - Government regulations in Pharma sector
 
02:42
Government regulations in Pharma sector
Views: 412 Sreekanth P. S.
Political Campaigns: Crash Course Government and Politics #39
 
09:36
So political campaigns are a pretty big deal in the United States. For instance the 2012 presidential election clocked in at the most expensive ever - at around $6 billion dollars! Needless to say, money plays a very big role in American elections. So today, Craig is going to take a look at why we have campaigns in the first place, why the campaign seasons run for so long, and of course why campaigns cost so much. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 389108 CrashCourse
GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS AND THE DEATH OF AMERICAN SMALL BUSINESS
 
14:55
Watch and share TRUTH TALK NEWS youtube.com/FreedomFirstFilms livestream.com/TruthTalkNews "Where truth the mainstream media ignores is the top story!" FAIR USE NOTICE: Some content displayed on this video may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.
Views: 106 TRUTH TALK NEWS