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Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) Payments — Agriculture Today — May 22, 2018
 
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On today’s episode: county-by-county estimates on ARC program payments for wheat producers on the 2017 crop; an update on spring crop pests; agricultural news, and this week's edition of "Milk Lines"; habitat changes for the western meadowlark… Agriculture Today is a daily program featuring Kansas State University agricultural specialists and other experts examining ag issues facing Kansas and the nation. It is hosted by Eric Atkinson and distributed to radio stations throughout Kansas and as a daily podcast. 00:01:30 – Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) Payments:  K-State risk management specialist Art Barnaby talks about the just-updated county-by-county estimates on A-R-C program payments for wheat producers on the 2017 crop, which will be issued this fall...he also addresses the issue of whether grain farmers are getting their futures contract orders appropriately filled in the current electronic trading format. 00:13:00 – Spring Crop Pests:  K-State crop entomologist Jeff Whitworth talks about the notable lack of alfalfa weevil pressure in stands so far this spring, a void that unfortunately is being filled by an onrush of pea aphids infesting alfalfa...he also talks about possible insect problems in seedling corn stands. 00:24:30 – Ag News:  Eric Atkinson covers the day's agricultural news headlines, and K-State Research and Extension dairy specialist Mike Brouk has this week's edition of "Milk Lines." 00:33:06 – Western Meadowlark:  K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee looks at how habitat changes have affected the western meadowlark, which is the official state bird of Kansas. Send comments, questions or requests for copies of past programs to [email protected] K‑State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well‑being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K‑State campus in Manhattan.
Farm Program Payments - Dan Steinkruger - October 7, 2016
 
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Dan Steinkruger, Nebraska State Farm Service Agency executive director, talks about farm program payments under Agriculture Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage. Dan also discusses approaching deadlines for producers across the state.
Views: 223 Market Journal
ARC & PLC Payments - Brad Lubben - October 20, 2017
 
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Brad Lubben, Nebraska Extension policy specialist, discusses farm program payments in Nebraska from Agriculture Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage.
Views: 192 Market Journal
MAIZE FARMERS RELIEF: Ministry of Agriculture releases payments after President’s order
 
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Maize farmers are breathing a sigh of relief after the government began paying their pending arrears following  Thursday's directive by President Uhuru Kenyatta. The first batch of 227 farmers from the North Rift region have already received 200 Million shillings in their accounts after the ministry of agriculture released  978Million shillings to pay farmers for maize delivered last year. Agriculture Cabinet Secretary who was in the President's firing line says staff of the national cereals and produce board will be working through out the weekend to expedite payments to farmers whose claims have already been verified.
Views: 449 K24TV
AFBF Market Intel Report: Where ARC Thou, Program Payments?
 
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AFBF Director of Market Intelligence Dr. John Newton discusses USDA's commodity support payments for the 2016-2017 crop year. Learn more at: http://www.fb.org/market-intel.
From seed to sale: financing full agricultural value chains
 
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responsAbility has invested in Suminter, a leading global organic products supply chain management company which sources, processes and exports certified 100% organic and GMO-free products from Asia and Africa. Founded in 2004, Suminter is a fast-growing, market-leading, global supply chain management company focused on 100% organic and GMO-free products, with a diverse product portfolio encompassing the largest segments in the long shelf life organic foods and fibre industry such as animal feed (soya), food (spices and herbs, cocoa, virgin coconut oil, vanilla, sugar, cereals and pulses, etc.) and whole body (cotton). The company’s sourcing and processing operations are spread across Asia and Africa and it has a diversified customer base across a total of 20 countries and 4 continents, such as US and Europe. The global organic food market has reached a critical mass and is growing fast, expected to reach USD 321 bn by 2025, which reflects a 10-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 13%. The long gestation periods for converting conventional farmland into organic farmland and for obtaining global certifications leads to entry barriers for companies who want to become active in the market. www.responsAbility.com
EU Agriculture- CAP- Produce food
 
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http://ec.europa.eu/agriculture/cap-for-our-roots/index_en.htm Ensuring a reliable supply of healthy, affordable food · Turning the diversity of farming into a strength. Direct payments will be targeted more fairly between Member States, regions and farmers to take fully into account Europe's different traditions, farming practices and rural economies. · Strengthening farmers' position within the food chain, to enable them to get the best market price for their produce. Professional and interprofessional organisations will have new rights to be able to increase efficiency, and producer organisations will be supported to develop direct sales between producers and consumers. · Providing better protection against price volatility. Mutual fund and agricultural income insurance will be promoted. A new crisis reserve will deliver immediate help to farmers in the event of an economic, weather-related or other type of crisis.
Views: 19441 European Commission
Career in Agriculture Science
 
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B.Sc. Agriculture in GB Pantnagar University
Views: 225913 Delhi Knowledge Track
Farm Connections (1009)
 
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Farm Connections explores the importance of introducing youth to agriculture; we learn about 2016 farm program payments; and the University of Minnesota Extension program.
Farm subsidies are a solution in search of a problem | reTHINK TANK
 
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POLL — Should Congress subsidize America's farms? https://goo.gl/oT25M3 The classic depiction of the American farm is an aging red barn on a plot of land tilled by a struggling mom and pop. Given that image, it's no wonder that Congress offers billions of dollars in subsidies to American food producers. The only problem? The struggling mom and pop are fiction. AEI Visiting Scholars Vincent H. Smith, Barry K. Goodwin, and Joseph W. Glauber explain. FULL REPORT — Agricultural Policy in Disarray https://goo.gl/6qhYnZ ARTICLE — Agricultural policy in disarray: Reforming the farm bill—an overview https://goo.gl/4AEop1 Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Photo credits: Getty's Open Content Program https://www.goodfreephotos.com Pexels Pixabay Reuters BY–sporst https://goo.gl/WxgG1z BY–Adrian Korte https://goo.gl/A4Pgsz BY-NC–Dennis Deery https://goo.gl/195Qzj BY–Briend https://goo.gl/HiehNE BY–United Soybean Board https://goo.gl/rBQCW1 Photos marked "BY" are used under Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ Photos marked "BY-NC" are used under Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/ Music credits: "Documentary Background" by 99Instrumentals "Gentle Marimba Documentary Interview Background" by ElevateAudio "Marimba" by MF_Production "Sneaky Marimba and Pizzicato" by MValentino "Marimba" by plaincask "Documentary" by ScorpionTrackz All music licensed through Audiojungle Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #farm #agriculture #corn #farmbill #food #economy #economics
Wisconsin Economy Situation and Outlook, Focus on Agriculture
 
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2019 WI AGRICULTURAL OUTLOOK FORUM PRESENTATIONS This one: Tessa Conroy – Wisconsin Economy Situation and Outlook The rest: Mark Stephenson – Dairy Situation and Outlook Brenda Boetel –Grain and Livestock Situation and Outlook Jed Colquhoun – Specialty Crop Situation and Outlook Paul Mitchell – Farm Income and the New Farm Bill Marin Bozic – Dairy Industry Data & Trends Pete Kappelman – Dairy Farmer Perspective Phil Plourd – Dairy Industry and the World Sue Taylor – Dairy Industry Consolidation The 2019 Wisconsin Agricultural Outlook Forum took place on Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at Union South on the UW-Madison campus. These are livestream captures of presentations by Renk Agribusiness Institute that ran from 10:00AM to 5:00PM with talks on the agricultural situation and outlook, dairy industry trends and farmer perspective, and various panels on the dairy industry. https://renk.aae.wisc.edu/ Streamed and recorded by the University of Wisconsin Nutrient and Pest Management (NPM) Program https://ipcm.wisc.edu/
Accepting SNAP/EBT Payments for Your CSA
 
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Watch this eOrganic webinar on how a Community Support Agriculture (CSA) farm can accept payment via SNAP/EBT cards (formerly food stamps). Presented by Bryan Allan, assistant farm manager at Zenger Farm in Portland, Oregon.
Views: 1407 eOrganic
Journey to Mobile Payments: The Story of USAID's ANGeL Project
 
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In Bangladesh, mSTAR works with the ANGeL (Agriculture, Nutrition and Gender Linkages) Project to integrate mobile payments into their project operations. In this video, the ANGeL Project explains how mobile payments benefit their project, how mSTAR helped them transition from cash. ANGeL Project is implemented by the Ministry of Agriculture in Bangladesh. It is partially funded by USAID and the IFPRI-led CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (A4NH), with technical assistance from IFPRI’s Bangladesh Policy Research and Strategy Support Program (PRSSP) and Helen Keller International (HKI).
Views: 124 mSTAR Project
Farm Financial Management with FCC Software
 
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www.prairiefarmreport.com/ Profile of 2 of Canada's top agricultural farm management software programs developed and distributed by the Farm Credit Corporation (FCC). Product Support Specialist with FCC Software, Thomas Chevalier comments on the many attributes of using Field Manager Pro which allows farmers to input and track their field activities. The program can be operated on tablets & smartphones. Richard Kuntz a Senior Product Analyst with FCC Software discusses AgExpert Analyst software and how it can make gathering data for income tax returns much easier. Jim Latrace a progressive seed and commercial farmer with LL Seeds near Lumsden, Sk., discusses how he uses both Field Manager Pro and AgExpert Analyst in his farming operation. He talks about the advantages of tracking crop inputs on mobile devices right in the field with Field Manager Pro. He also demonstrates how much easier farm accounting is when it comes to submitting GST payments and completing annual tax returns for the Canada Revenue Agency. He points out how the software makes meeting payroll commitments much easier on the farm.
Views: 1888 Prairie Farm Report
Debating Government Payments for Farmers
 
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Subscribe to the VOA Learning English Channel: http://youtube.com/voalearningenglish From VOA Learning English, this is the Agriculture Report. The United States Congress has been debating a new Farm Bill. This is a huge five-year plan that includes support programs for American farmers. Government payments make up eight percent of the income of farmers growing such major crops as maize, wheat, soybeans, cotton and peanuts. That eight percent is one of the lowest levels of support among developed countries. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development says the average among its members is 20 percent. One reason for the low payments is high global crop prices. The price supports, or subsidies, that pay farmers when prices are low have not been used very much recently.Grain prices are high. Farmers have earned record or near-record profits in the past few years. But they still receive about $5 billion every year in what are called direct payments. These payments go to farmers whether crop prices are high or low. Farmers do not even have to grow a crop to get direct payments. Now, Congress wants to cut between $20 and $40 billion from farm subsidies. Even the largest farmers' group, the American Farm Bureau Federation, expects that direct payments will end soon. Mary Kay Thatcher is the chief lobbyist for the group. She says the payments are hard to justify politically. But there are proposals to increase subsidies once crop prices go down again. One version would let farmers receive payments with higher market prices. Another would protect a farmer's total income when prices fall. David Orden is an economist with the International Food Policy Institute. He says both versions would anger farmers in other countries. For VOA Learning English, I'm Laurel Bowman.
Views: 13420 VOA Learning English
Farm Program Payments - Brad Lubben - August 14, 2015
 
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Brad Lubben, Nebraska Extension public policy specialist, explains farm program payments Nebraska growers could receive this fall under Agriculture Risk Coverage or Price Loss Coverage enrollments.
Views: 285 Market Journal
Market Facilitation Payments Program a Go for December
 
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During a Champaign County, Illinois listening session U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue confirmed the second round of Market Facilitation Payments for farmers will be coming in December.
Views: 139 Todd Gleason
KY Agriculture Water Quality Act – Mark Turner's Story
 
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Mark Turner describes how he balances production agriculture with conservation on his farm in Ohio County, Kentucky. For more information on the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act and how to make your own ag water quality plan, please visit: http://www.uky.edu/bae/awqp - What is the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act? The Kentucky General Assembly passed the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Act in 1994. The goal of the act is to protect surface and groundwater resources from pollution as a result of agriculture and silviculture (forestry) activities. - Whom does the Agriculture Water Quality Act affect? The Agriculture Water Quality Act requires all landowner/land users with ten (10) or more acres that is being used for agriculture or silviculture operations to develop and implement a water quality plan based upon guidance from the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan. - How are agriculture and silviculture defined under the Agriculture Water Quality Act? "Agriculture operation" means any farm operation on a tract of land, including all income producing improvements and farm dwellings, together with other farm buildings and structures incident to the operation and maintenance of the farm, situated on ten (10) contiguous acres or more of land used for the production of livestock, livestock products, poultry, poultry products, milk, milk products, or silviculture products or for the growing of crops such as, but not limited to, tobacco, corn, soybeans, small grains, fruits and vegetables, or devoted to and meeting the requirements and qualifications for payments to agriculture programs under an agreement with the state or federal government. "Silviculture" generally means that part of forestry that involves growing and harvesting of trees. - What is the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan? The Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan consists of best management practices from six different areas - Silviculture, Pesticides and Fertilizers, Farmstead, Crops, Livestock, and Streams and Other Waters. Each BMP includes definitions and descriptions, regulatory requirements, Agriculture Water Quality Authority requirements, design information, practice maintenance, technical assistance, cost share assistance, recommendations and references. This statewide plan will serve as a guide to individual landowners/land users as they develop water quality plans for their individual operations. - What is the process for developing and implementing an individual water quality plan? Individual landowners/land users must fully implement applicable requirements of the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan by October 23, 2001. Various tools are available to help landowners develop their plan. This web site contains an on-line tool to be used by landowners to assess their operation and identify best management practices to be included in their individual plan. After identifying the best management practices, landowners/land users implement these practices on their land. Assistance to implement the plan can be obtained through a variety of technical agencies.
Landlords and Subsidy Payments — Agriculture Today —August 16, 2018
 
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On today’s episode: a new study looks at USDA crop program subsidies, and how they factor into farmland rental payments; adjusting the combine ahead of corn harvest to avoid grain losses in the field; you can renovate your drought-stressed lawn this fall… Agriculture Today is a daily program featuring Kansas State University agricultural specialists and other experts examining ag issues facing Kansas and the nation. It is hosted by Eric Atkinson and distributed to radio stations throughout Kansas and as a daily podcast. 00:01:30 – Landlords and Subsidy Payments:  K-State agricultural economist Nathan Hendricks shares the findings from his new study, which looked at USDA crop program subsidies and how they factor into farmland rental payments...he specifically was interested in the extent to which landlords gain from those subsidies, compared to tenants...he is presenting that information later today at K-State' Risk and Profit Conference. 00:13:00 – Equipment Adjustments:  K-State crops and soils specialist Gretchen Sassenrath talks about the importance of adjusting the combine ahead of corn harvest to avoid grain losses in the field....she goes over a simple method of measuring those losses, and talks about minimizing those to save grain and to prevent volunteer corn from turning up in the field later on. 00:24:30 – Ag News:  Eric Atkinson covers the day's agricultural news headlines, including this week’s Kansas soybean update. 00:32:58 – Relief For Drought-Stressed Lawns:  K-State turfgrass specialist Jared Hoyle talks about getting ready to renovate a drought-stressed fescue lawn this fall.   Send comments, questions or requests for copies of past programs to [email protected] K‑State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well‑being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K‑State campus in Manhattan.
Market Journal - October 20, 2017 (full episode)
 
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This week on Market Journal… Market Analysis – Jeff Peterson, Heartland Farm Partners president, gives an update on harvest progress and yield results across the country. Jeff also talks about selling strategies for 2017 corn and soybeans. Cutting or Grazing Alfalfa – Bruce Anderson, Nebraska Extension forage specialist, outlines recommendations for cutting or grazing alfalfa in October. ARC & PLC Payments – Brad Lubben, Nebraska Extension policy specialist, discusses farm program payments in Nebraska from Agriculture Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage. Ephemeral Gullies – Britt Weiser, Nebraska Natural Resources Conservation Service state resource conservationist, explains how producers with highly erodible cropland will need to control ephemeral erosion in order to maintain farm program benefits. Weather Outlook – Al Dutcher, Nebraska Extension agricultural climatologist, gives his forecast for the coming week.
Views: 379 Market Journal
Agricultural Subsidies: Corporate Welfare for Farmers
 
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"The government is bailing out the banks...but who's going to bail out the government?" asks Texas cotton farmer Ken Gallaway, a vocal critic of agricultural subsidies that cost U.S. taxpayers and consumers billions of dollars a year in direct payments and higher prices for farm goods. Agricultural subsidies were put in place in the 1930s during the Great Depression, when 25 percent of Americans lived on farms. At the time, Secretary of Agriculture Henry Wallace called them "a temporary solution to deal with an emergency." Those programs are still in place today, even though less than 1 percent of Americans currently live on farms that are larger, more efficient, and more productive than ever before. Consider these facts. Ninety percent of all subsidies go to just five crops: corn, rice, cotton, wheat, and soybeans. Two thirds of all farm products—including perishable fruits and vegetables—receive almost no subsidies. And just 10 percent of recipients receive 75 percent of all subsidies. A program intended to be a temporary solution has become one of our governments most glaring examples of corporate welfare. U.S. taxpayers arent the only ones who pay the price. Cotton subsidies, for example, encourage overproduction which lowers the world price of cotton. Thats great for people who buy cotton, but its disastrous for already impoverished cotton farmers in places such as West Africa. U.S. farm programs cost taxpayers billions each year, significantly raise the price of commodities such as sugar (which is protected from competition from other producers in other countries), undermine world trade agreements, and contribute to the suffering of poor farmers around the world. Its bad public policy, especially in these troubled economic times. "Agricultural Subsidies: Corporate Welfare for Farmers" is hosted by Reason.tv's Nick Gillespie and is approximately 8.30 minutes long. The producer-writer is Paul Feine and the producer-editor is Roger Richards.
Views: 18288 ReasonTV
KY Agriculture Water Quality Act – Sherwood Acres Farm
 
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Jon Bednarski describes how a water quality plan has helped to improve their farmland and the land around them. For more information on the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act and how to make your own ag water quality plan, please visit: http://www.uky.edu/bae/awqp - What is the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act? The Kentucky General Assembly passed the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Act in 1994. The goal of the act is to protect surface and groundwater resources from pollution as a result of agriculture and silviculture (forestry) activities. - Whom does the Agriculture Water Quality Act affect? The Agriculture Water Quality Act requires all landowner/land users with ten (10) or more acres that is being used for agriculture or silviculture operations to develop and implement a water quality plan based upon guidance from the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan. - How are agriculture and silviculture defined under the Agriculture Water Quality Act? "Agriculture operation" means any farm operation on a tract of land, including all income producing improvements and farm dwellings, together with other farm buildings and structures incident to the operation and maintenance of the farm, situated on ten (10) contiguous acres or more of land used for the production of livestock, livestock products, poultry, poultry products, milk, milk products, or silviculture products or for the growing of crops such as, but not limited to, tobacco, corn, soybeans, small grains, fruits and vegetables, or devoted to and meeting the requirements and qualifications for payments to agriculture programs under an agreement with the state or federal government. "Silviculture" generally means that part of forestry that involves growing and harvesting of trees. - What is the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan? The Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan consists of best management practices from six different areas - Silviculture, Pesticides and Fertilizers, Farmstead, Crops, Livestock, and Streams and Other Waters. Each BMP includes definitions and descriptions, regulatory requirements, Agriculture Water Quality Authority requirements, design information, practice maintenance, technical assistance, cost share assistance, recommendations and references. This statewide plan will serve as a guide to individual landowners/land users as they develop water quality plans for their individual operations. - What is the process for developing and implementing an individual water quality plan? Individual landowners/land users must fully implement applicable requirements of the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan by October 23, 2001. Various tools are available to help landowners develop their plan. This web site contains an on-line tool to be used by landowners to assess their operation and identify best management practices to be included in their individual plan. After identifying the best management practices, landowners/land users implement these practices on their land. Assistance to implement the plan can be obtained through a variety of technical agencies.
Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act - Tallow Creek
 
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Harry and Karen Pelle discuss their decision to manage their land for timber. For more information on the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act and how to make your own ag water quality plan, please visit: http://www.uky.edu/bae/awqp - What is the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act? The Kentucky General Assembly passed the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Act in 1994. The goal of the act is to protect surface and groundwater resources from pollution as a result of agriculture and silviculture (forestry) activities. - Whom does the Agriculture Water Quality Act affect? The Agriculture Water Quality Act requires all landowner/land users with ten (10) or more acres that is being used for agriculture or silviculture operations to develop and implement a water quality plan based upon guidance from the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan. - How are agriculture and silviculture defined under the Agriculture Water Quality Act? "Agriculture operation" means any farm operation on a tract of land, including all income producing improvements and farm dwellings, together with other farm buildings and structures incident to the operation and maintenance of the farm, situated on ten (10) contiguous acres or more of land used for the production of livestock, livestock products, poultry, poultry products, milk, milk products, or silviculture products or for the growing of crops such as, but not limited to, tobacco, corn, soybeans, small grains, fruits and vegetables, or devoted to and meeting the requirements and qualifications for payments to agriculture programs under an agreement with the state or federal government. "Silviculture" generally means that part of forestry that involves growing and harvesting of trees. - What is the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan? The Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan consists of best management practices from six different areas - Silviculture, Pesticides and Fertilizers, Farmstead, Crops, Livestock, and Streams and Other Waters. Each BMP includes definitions and descriptions, regulatory requirements, Agriculture Water Quality Authority requirements, design information, practice maintenance, technical assistance, cost share assistance, recommendations and references. This statewide plan will serve as a guide to individual landowners/land users as they develop water quality plans for their individual operations. - What is the process for developing and implementing an individual water quality plan? Individual landowners/land users must fully implement applicable requirements of the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan by October 23, 2001. Various tools are available to help landowners develop their plan. This web site contains an on-line tool to be used by landowners to assess their operation and identify best management practices to be included in their individual plan. After identifying the best management practices, landowners/land users implement these practices on their land. Assistance to implement the plan can be obtained through a variety of technical agencies. ----- The College of Agriculture, Food and Environment serves the people of Kentucky and the world, through unparalleled teaching, transformative research and relevant service to farms, families and communities. The college proudly continues to build upon its land grant tradition with a strong commitment to improve lives and to build a sustainable future. Learn more ----- www.ca.uky.edu Apply and start your future in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment ----- http://students.ca.uky.edu/future The University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service provides practical education you can trust to help people, businesses, and communities solve problems, develop skills, and build a better future. Find an office near you ----- http://extension.ca.uky.edu
Seve Censky on the Farm Bill and Market Facilitation Program payments
 
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Steve Censky responds to questions about the Farm Bill and Market Facilitation Program payments.
Commodity Marketing Assistance Loans and Loan Deficiency Payments
 
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See: http://www.farm-ag-loans.com/ Your Agriculture, Farm and Ranch Loan Partner You love to grow things - We love to help! Great Loan Rates for Farmers, Agriculturists and Ranchers For more info, see: http://www.govloans.gov/loans/loan-details/339
Views: 262 farmagloans
KY Agriculture Water Quality Act – Jim Morse's Story
 
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Jim Morse tells his story of raising beef cattle from the top of the watershed. For more information on the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act and how to make your own ag water quality plan, please visit: http://www.uky.edu/bae/awqp - What is the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act? The Kentucky General Assembly passed the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Act in 1994. The goal of the act is to protect surface and groundwater resources from pollution as a result of agriculture and silviculture (forestry) activities. - Whom does the Agriculture Water Quality Act affect? The Agriculture Water Quality Act requires all landowner/land users with ten (10) or more acres that is being used for agriculture or silviculture operations to develop and implement a water quality plan based upon guidance from the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan. - How are agriculture and silviculture defined under the Agriculture Water Quality Act? "Agriculture operation" means any farm operation on a tract of land, including all income producing improvements and farm dwellings, together with other farm buildings and structures incident to the operation and maintenance of the farm, situated on ten (10) contiguous acres or more of land used for the production of livestock, livestock products, poultry, poultry products, milk, milk products, or silviculture products or for the growing of crops such as, but not limited to, tobacco, corn, soybeans, small grains, fruits and vegetables, or devoted to and meeting the requirements and qualifications for payments to agriculture programs under an agreement with the state or federal government. "Silviculture" generally means that part of forestry that involves growing and harvesting of trees. - What is the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan? The Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan consists of best management practices from six different areas - Silviculture, Pesticides and Fertilizers, Farmstead, Crops, Livestock, and Streams and Other Waters. Each BMP includes definitions and descriptions, regulatory requirements, Agriculture Water Quality Authority requirements, design information, practice maintenance, technical assistance, cost share assistance, recommendations and references. This statewide plan will serve as a guide to individual landowners/land users as they develop water quality plans for their individual operations. - What is the process for developing and implementing an individual water quality plan? Individual landowners/land users must fully implement applicable requirements of the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan by October 23, 2001. Various tools are available to help landowners develop their plan. This web site contains an on-line tool to be used by landowners to assess their operation and identify best management practices to be included in their individual plan. After identifying the best management practices, landowners/land users implement these practices on their land. Assistance to implement the plan can be obtained through a variety of technical agencies.
KY Agriculture Water Quality Plan – TNT Farms
 
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Tee Ray describes how his water quality plan has helped to improve their farming operation. For more information on the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act and how to make your own ag water quality plan, please visit: http://www.uky.edu/bae/awqp - What is the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act? The Kentucky General Assembly passed the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Act in 1994. The goal of the act is to protect surface and groundwater resources from pollution as a result of agriculture and silviculture (forestry) activities. - Whom does the Agriculture Water Quality Act affect? The Agriculture Water Quality Act requires all landowner/land users with ten (10) or more acres that is being used for agriculture or silviculture operations to develop and implement a water quality plan based upon guidance from the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan. - How are agriculture and silviculture defined under the Agriculture Water Quality Act? "Agriculture operation" means any farm operation on a tract of land, including all income producing improvements and farm dwellings, together with other farm buildings and structures incident to the operation and maintenance of the farm, situated on ten (10) contiguous acres or more of land used for the production of livestock, livestock products, poultry, poultry products, milk, milk products, or silviculture products or for the growing of crops such as, but not limited to, tobacco, corn, soybeans, small grains, fruits and vegetables, or devoted to and meeting the requirements and qualifications for payments to agriculture programs under an agreement with the state or federal government. "Silviculture" generally means that part of forestry that involves growing and harvesting of trees. - What is the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan? The Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan consists of best management practices from six different areas - Silviculture, Pesticides and Fertilizers, Farmstead, Crops, Livestock, and Streams and Other Waters. Each BMP includes definitions and descriptions, regulatory requirements, Agriculture Water Quality Authority requirements, design information, practice maintenance, technical assistance, cost share assistance, recommendations and references. This statewide plan will serve as a guide to individual landowners/land users as they develop water quality plans for their individual operations. - What is the process for developing and implementing an individual water quality plan? Individual landowners/land users must fully implement applicable requirements of the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan by October 23, 2001. Various tools are available to help landowners develop their plan. This web site contains an on-line tool to be used by landowners to assess their operation and identify best management practices to be included in their individual plan. After identifying the best management practices, landowners/land users implement these practices on their land. Assistance to implement the plan can be obtained through a variety of technical agencies.
Part 4: Calculating ARC PLC Payments
 
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Farmland owners by FSA farm number have a one-time opportunity to: (1) maintain the farm’s 2013 base acres of covered commodities through 2018; or (2) reallocate base acres among those covered commodities planted on the farm during the 2009 to 2012 crop years. The first step is whether you want to update base acres and/or yields. The landowner makes that final decision and signs the appropriate FSA form CCC 858. The landowner has between Sept. 29, 2014, to Feb. 27, 2015, to update base acres and/or yields by FSA farm number. When updating the farm’s yield, a choice needs to be made by the landowner on the farm. Should they retain the farm’s CC yield or update to a new Price Loss Coverage (PLC) yield? This new yield would reflect actual production for a commodity crop grown on the farm during the years 2008 to 2012. This base acres and/or yield update can take place now through Feb. 27, 2015. The current producer on the farm can then elect by FSA farm number between a revenue-loss program that covers a combination of price and yield losses -- Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC) or a price-loss only program known as PLC. The second and third steps involve the current producer(s) on the farm. The second step is the determination of whether or not to elect ARC or PLC. Learn more: ISU Ag Decision Maker Farm Bill Information: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/agdm/info/farmbill.html USDA Farm Service Agency ARC PLC Programs: http://www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&subject=arpl&topic=landing
Debating Direct Payments to Farmers
 
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From VOA Learning English, this is the Agriculture Report. The United States Senate recently voted to cut a program that makes $5 billion a year in direct payments to farmers. But the Senate agreed to add new subsidies that critics say could hurt farmers in other countries. The vote was part of a $955 billion farm bill approved by a wide majority in the Senate. Ten days later, however, the House of Representatives defeated its own version of the farm bill. The Senate bill would cut about $24 billion from the federal budget over 10 years. Some of those cuts come from direct payments. Farmers receive direct payments whether they had good years or bad. But high crop prices and historically high farm profits have made the payments politically unpopular at a time of reduced federal spending.The Senate bill would help farmers manage the risk of bad weather and bad markets. It would do this by offering crop insurance to farmers raising crops that have not previously been insured. And it would make payments to farmers if prices drop too much. Supporters say the goal is to help the American farmers who supply the nation with food. But critics say the bill goes too far. Some say the proposed new guarantees to pay farmers if prices drop could cause trouble for the United States at the World Trade Organization. Other countries could claim that the policy suppresses prices in world markets. The bill would also let the government buy $60 million in emergency food aid closer to where a crisis is happening. Supporters say doing that is faster and cheaper than shipping food from the United States, and could save more lives. For VOA Learning English, I'm Mario Ritter.
Views: 11332 VOA Learning English
Trade Disputes, Trade Relief and the Farm Bill, FAPRI’s Westhoff, 08.02.18
 
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Title: Trade Disputes, Trade Relief and the Farm Bill Video: August 2, 2018 Presenter: Dr. Patrick Westhoff, Director of the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at the University of Missouri–Columbia and a Professor in the MU Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics Description: As Congress considers a new farm bill, trade disputes have had a negative impact on prices for soybeans and other agricultural commodities and the Administration has announced plans to provide additional federal support to the farm sector. As of 08/02/18 Westhoff brought perspective to this quickly-changing situation and discussed possible implications for agricultural markets and farm program payments. Bio: Dr. Patrick Westhoff is the director of the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at the University of Missouri–Columbia and a professor in the MU department of agricultural and applied economics. He has degrees from the University of Iowa and the University of Texas, and a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Iowa State University. He served in the Peace Corps in Guatemala, and was an economist with the U.S. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry before joining MU in 1996.
Views: 319 UAEX Internal
Agri tech startup - Agrostar
 
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Agri-tech start-up AgroStar -This startups built a unique business model which helps farmers with the help of technology. AgroStar, a Pune-based m-commerce startup sells agricultural inputs to door step and provide free advice to the farmers.
Views: 22078 CNBC Awaaz
USDA's Market Facilitation Program helps growers during trade uncertainty
 
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"Producers can apply without proof of yield but must certify 2018 production by May 1, 2019," said Bill Northey, under secretary for farm production and conservation at USDA. Since its launch in September 2018, more than 864,000 producers have applied, supporting those hit hard with nearly $8 billion in estimated payments. “Farmers are very resilient, and these payments are helping agricultural producers meet some of the costs of disrupted markets in 2018,” said Northey. “We view it as a short-term solution to help America’s farmers through these times of trade uncertainty". USDA previously announced the second and final round of trade mitigation payments. Producers need only sign-up once for the MFP to be eligible for the first and second payments.
Views: 29 MichiganFarmBureau
Grassley Wins Support for Payment Reform and Even-Handed Farm Bill Spending Reductions
 
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During work today in the Senate Budget Committee on a budget resolution for fiscal 2014, Senator Chuck Grassley affirmed that his initiative to reform farm program payments will be part of the Agriculture Committee's effort to achieve $23 billion in agricultural savings sought by the Budget Committee and that, contrary to what the Budget Committee Chairwoman's proposed budget says, all farm-bill spending will be on the table for spending reductions, including nutrition programs.
Views: 102 SenChuckGrassley
Farm subsidies: Where the money goes | IN 60 SECONDS
 
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As AEI Visiting Scholar Eric Belasco explains, the biggest beneficiaries of American farm subsidies are the biggest farms with the least need. Two new policy proposals might help to save money for taxpayers while still bolstering smaller farms. FULL REPORT — Where the money goes: The distribution of crop insurance and other farm subsidy payments https://goo.gl/gkNdxs ARTICLE — Farm subsidies need reform. Congress can start by ending ‘double dipping’ https://goo.gl/zLjX5r Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Photo credits: Shuttestock Unsplash Music credit: "Kickin It" by Jingle Punks — provided by YouTube Audio Library Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #farming #farm #agriculture #corn #soy #taxes #economy #economics
Guide to the Use of Digital Financial Services in Agriculture  Launch Event
 
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Smallholder farmers have the potential to play an ever-increasing role in feeding the world through sustainable supply of key agricultural commodities. However, most smallholders lack their own funds to invest in their farms to improve productivity and connect to markets. Without inclusive market systems, smallholders must rely on their own limited savings to invest in their farm, education, and other household needs, which contributes to lower productivity, persistent income inequality, and slower economic growth. The nature and scale of these challenges are familiar to those of you who are driving the progress of the U.S. Government’s Feed the Future initiative, which, over the past few years, has been addressing many of these challenges in order to unlock the potential of agriculture to reduce hunger, extreme poverty, and malnutrition. The Guide to the Use of Digital Finance in Agriculture aims to provide a quick and easy-to-use tool to understand how one new technology platform, digital finance, can help address some of the challenges that smallholder farmers are experiencing today – mainly, lack of access to financial services and convenient payment systems. The launch event will assist USAID and its implementing partners in the use of this quick and easy-to-use tool to address some of the challenges that smallholder farmers are experiencing today – primarily, lack of access to financial services and convenient payment systems. The goal of the Guide to the Use of Digital Finance in Agriculture is to identify specific challenges in value chains that can be addressed by improved payments or financial services, and then to identify corresponding DFS solutions to these specific challenges, with the aim of improving the ability of value chains to increase farmer incomes. In doing so, it is possible to increase farmer household access to a transaction account that builds household resiliency and offers access to payments and financial services long after an aid project or intervention is complete. Ultimately, this will move us closer to Feed the Future’s joint high-level objectives of inclusive agricultural sector growth and improved nutritional status. On February 17, 2016, USAID's Digital Development team and Bureau for Food Security hosted Launch of the Guide to the Use of Digital Financial Services in Agriculture at FHI 360. The launch event will assist USAID and its implementing partners in the use of this quick and easy-to-use tool to address some of the challenges that smallholder farmers are experiencing today – primarily, lack of access to financial services and convenient payment systems. This event provided an overview of the Guide and featured a panel of USAID implementing partners, who are are incorporating digital financial services into their agricultural activities under Feed the Future programs. Currently, the guide can be found here: http://www.ictworks.org/2016/02/16/new-usaid-guide-how-to-use-digital-financial-services-in-agriculture/?utm_source=ICTworks&utm_campaign=d865af311c-ICTworksEmailRSS&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0814c7961e-d865af311c-48320217
Views: 251 mSTAR Project
REDD+ Learning Session 58: How the BioCarbon Fund will pilot results-based payments for landscapes
 
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This is an archive of a session that took place on Wednesday, January 24, 2018. You can download a copy of the presentation with reference information here: http://bit.ly/2rxmy20 See answers to additional participant questions here: http://bit.ly/2FtGFQT The BioCarbon Fund Initiative for Sustainable Forest Landscapes (ISFL) is a multilateral fund that promotes reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the land sector. Late last year, the ISFL launched a first-of-its-kind comprehensive landscape greenhouse gas accounting approach that countries can use to access results-based payments from the fund and test approaches to account for emission reductions from landscapes involving forests, agriculture, and other relevant sectors that affect land use. This accounting framework is known as the ISFL Emission Reductions Program Requirements. In this learning session, Marco van der Linden from the World Bank highlights the objectives of the fund and walk participants through these ISFL Emission Reductions Program Requirements.
Cost of Studying & Living in Canada for International Students | Tuition Fees in Canada | ChetChat
 
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Cost of Study in Canada | How Much Does it Cost of Studying & Living in Canada for International Students. Tuition Fees in Canada with #ChetChat. How to Study in Canada for Free - https://bit.ly/2NTn44D Find out how to study in Canada and the cost of study in Canada, all details on the cost of studying in Canada and the cost of study in canada for Indians, with figures on expense to study in Canada and also how much does it cost to study in Canada as well as the cost of study in Toronto. In this Masterclass we will talk about the costs of studying in Canada for international students under the following heads a) Undergraduate tuition fee and Graduate Tuition Fee - a. For different Fields of study b. Across major provinces in Canada b) Cost of living c) Lowest Cost Universities in Canada and Average tuition fee of the top ranked universities d) Comparison of Costs with USA, UK, Australia, New Zealand and Singapore Undergraduate tuition fees in Canada The average tuition fees for international students in 2017/18 was CA$25,000 (~US$19,000 = Rs. 13,80,000) per year. a) Humanities, Arts, Social sciences, agriculture – CAD 22,000 to CAD 26,000 b) Architecture – CAD 25,000 c) Law – CAD 30,000 d) Physical sciences, computer science, math, engineering – CAD 30,000 e) Business administration – CAD 26,000 Postgraduate tuition fees in Canada The tuition fees for grad school is generally lower, the average for 2017/18 is CA$16,000 (US$12,000 = Rs. 8,80,000) a) Humanities, Arts, Social sciences, agriculture – CAD 13,000 to CAD 14,000 b) Architecture – CAD 24,000 (similar) c) Law – CAD 16,000 d) Physical sciences, computer science, math, engineering – CAD 15,000 – 18,000 e) Business administration – CAD 26,000 f) Regular MBA – CAD 40,000 g) Executive MBA – CAD 60,000 h) Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry, Veterinary Medicine – CAD10,000 to CAD 21,000 Cost of living in Canada Although Canadian student visa requirements say you must have at least CA$10,000 , estimate about CAD 15,000 to CAD 16,000 Most affordable universities in Canada Tuition fee between $5,000 and $12,000  Dominican University College  Brandon University  Universite de Saint-Bonaface  Canadian Menno-night University  Memorial University Of Newfoundland  Southern Alberta Institute of Technology  The Kings University College  Athabasca University  Canadian Mennonite University  Université de Moncton  Saint Paul University  Universite’ Saint- Anne  Mount Royal University  The University of Winnipeg  Concordia University of Edmonton Cost of Studying & Living in Canada for International Students, ChetChat, study in Canada, cost of study in Canada, cost of studying in Canada, cost of study in canada for Indians, expense to study in Canada, how much does it cost to study in Canada, cost of study in Toronto, study abroad, cost of education in Canada, cheapest universities in Canada, study expenses in Canada, what is the cost of study in Canada, study abroad in Canada, study, Canada, Toronto, cost of living in canada for Indians, cost of living in canada for international students, cost of studying in canada for international students Host – Chetna Vasishth www.youtube.com/c/ChetChat101 https://www.facebook.com/chetchat101/ https://twitter.com/chetchat101 https://www.instagram.com/chetchat101/ Gmail - [email protected] Click the link below to get our More Videos: How to Start a Restaurant Business-- https://goo.gl/lYhxOX How to become a CA - http://pics.ee/v-1617220 How to become a CA in India - http://lnk.pics/v-2390580 Entrepreneur Success Story India-- https://goo.gl/jDs525 How to Become a Lawyer-- https://goo.gl/GPYItf How to Become a Doctor-- https://goo.gl/uks2Ch Day in the life of an Investment Banker - http://lnk.pics/v-2517137 #TuitionFees #StudyinCanada #CostofLivinginCanada Thank You!
Views: 83743 ChetChat
CS Kiunjuri: “Most suspect payments in maize scam were made before my time.”
 
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Agriculture cabinet secretary Mwangi Kiunjuri has now accused the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission and the Directorate of Criminal Investigations of delaying investigations into the 9.4 billion shillings maize scandal. Kiunjuri says that while a number of farmers have received their payments, some are still waiting for the completion off investigations into the scandal. Watch more NTV Kenya videos at ntv.co.ke and nation.co.ke. Follow @ntvkenya on Twitter. Like our page on Facebook: NTV Kenya. Follow and Double tap on Instagram: NTV Kenya Join Our Telegram channel: www.telegram.me/NTVNewsRush
Views: 1159 NTV Kenya
KY Agriculture Water Quality Act – Bob James' Story
 
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Bob James and his sons tell their story of farming over 400 acres in Fayette County, Kentucky, with a focus on conservation. For more information on the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act and how to make your own ag water quality plan, please visit: http://www.uky.edu/bae/awqp - What is the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act? The Kentucky General Assembly passed the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Act in 1994. The goal of the act is to protect surface and groundwater resources from pollution as a result of agriculture and silviculture (forestry) activities. - Whom does the Agriculture Water Quality Act affect? The Agriculture Water Quality Act requires all landowner/land users with ten (10) or more acres that is being used for agriculture or silviculture operations to develop and implement a water quality plan based upon guidance from the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan. - How are agriculture and silviculture defined under the Agriculture Water Quality Act? "Agriculture operation" means any farm operation on a tract of land, including all income producing improvements and farm dwellings, together with other farm buildings and structures incident to the operation and maintenance of the farm, situated on ten (10) contiguous acres or more of land used for the production of livestock, livestock products, poultry, poultry products, milk, milk products, or silviculture products or for the growing of crops such as, but not limited to, tobacco, corn, soybeans, small grains, fruits and vegetables, or devoted to and meeting the requirements and qualifications for payments to agriculture programs under an agreement with the state or federal government. "Silviculture" generally means that part of forestry that involves growing and harvesting of trees. - What is the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan? The Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan consists of best management practices from six different areas - Silviculture, Pesticides and Fertilizers, Farmstead, Crops, Livestock, and Streams and Other Waters. Each BMP includes definitions and descriptions, regulatory requirements, Agriculture Water Quality Authority requirements, design information, practice maintenance, technical assistance, cost share assistance, recommendations and references. This statewide plan will serve as a guide to individual landowners/land users as they develop water quality plans for their individual operations. - What is the process for developing and implementing an individual water quality plan? Individual landowners/land users must fully implement applicable requirements of the Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Plan by October 23, 2001. Various tools are available to help landowners develop their plan. This web site contains an on-line tool to be used by landowners to assess their operation and identify best management practices to be included in their individual plan. After identifying the best management practices, landowners/land users implement these practices on their land. Assistance to implement the plan can be obtained through a variety of technical agencies.
CS Mwangi Kiunjuru: Some leaders are behind the NCPB Scandal
 
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Agriculture Cabinet Secretary Mwangi Kiunjuru alleged that some leaders are behind the NCPB Scandal that saw Kenyans lose billions of shillings in dubious payments. Kiunjuri who was appearing before National Assembly Agricultural Committee regretted the theft of the money and promised that the government will get to the bottom of the matter. Also, leaders from Rift Valley found themselves in the firing line over the Sh2 billion National Cereals and Produce Board (NCPB) scandal after angry farmers accused them of complicity in the saga. The more than 400 farmers from north rift met, with some leaders in Eldoret town yesterday in a session that almost turned chaotic. A number of leaders were shouted down and challenged to come out clean on their involvement in the scandal. Kapseret MP Oscar Sudi was jeered after he suggested that politicians had no role in resolving the scandal, which he said should be left to the Directorate of Criminal Investigation. His Soy counterpart Caleb Kositany was challenged to say what he knew about the scandal in which cartels were allowed to import maize and were paid, while thousands of farmers were left out. Farmers also asked Senate Majority Leader Kipchumba Murkomen to stop criticising leaders for speaking up against the scandal. “We are being called cartels yet we are genuine farmers. Leaders such as Elgeyo Marakwet Senator have been criticising those who are defending us, yet he knows who the cartels are. We demand our pay for the maize we delivered to the depots,” said David Chepsiya, their representative. SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more great videos: https://www.youtube.com/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/KTNNews Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KTNNewsKenya For more great content go to http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/ktnnews and download our apps: http://std.co.ke/apps/#android KTN News is a leading 24-hour TV channel in Eastern Africa with its headquarters located along Mombasa Road, at Standard Group Centre. This is the most authoritative news channel in Kenya and beyond.
Views: 9863 KTN News Kenya
The New Deal: Crash Course US History #34
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about the New Deal, which was president Franklin D. Roosevelt's plan to pull the united States out of the Great Depression of the 1930's. Did it work? Maybe. John will teach you about some of the most effective and some of the best known programs of the New Deal. They weren't always the same thing. John will tell you who supported the New Deal, and who opposed it. He'll also get into how the New Deal changed the relationship between the government and citizens, and will even reveal just how the Depression ended. (hint: it was war spending) Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. President Roosevelt developed his New Deal policies to ease the economic burdens of the Great Depression, a grim reality he began to tackle with his first fireside chat: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/president-roosevelt-s-first-fireside-chat In his Economic Bill of Rights, FDR tried to get the country to trust its banks again: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-economic-bill-of-rights Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @br8dybrunch
Views: 2622720 CrashCourse
"Safety-Net" Crop Payments Increasing, USDA Says
 
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USDA this week began sending out what will amount to nearly $8 billion in 2015 commodity support payments to American farmers. Producers, many facing lower commodity prices with the current year’s crop, will find the safety-net money in their mailboxes over the coming months. Price Loss Coverage, or PLC, and Agricultural Risk Coverage, or ARC, - both County and Individual - replaced the previous direct payment program after passage of the 2014 Farm Bill. The change brought an end to what opponents to the legislation called guaranteed payments under the previous law. Producers who signed up for ARC or PLC last year made five-year commitments, and those decisions required a bit of guessing on grain prices in future years. Many farmers, including one Iowa row-crop producer, chose ARC because PLC is considered more beneficial only when prices drop dramatically. Richard Dreifke, Hubbard, Iowa: “With PLC, it has to be under $3.70 for corn and $8.40 for soybeans, and we are banking on prices being higher than that.” So were other farmers. Seventy-six percent of the enrolled base acres are in the ARC-County program. And falling prices in 2016 may make for another year of safety-net payments to the 1.7 billion enrolled farms. In 2014, ARC-County paid the owners of 900,000 farms a total of $4.4 billion for all crops. Data for the same program in 2015 shows initial “safety-net” payments of $5.6 billion paid to the owners of 1.2 million farms. USDA officials said the PLC program paid about $800,000 to 90,000 operations in 2014, but – so far - that has grown to $1.2 billion among 350,000 operations for the 2015 crop year. Officials said that ARC-Individual data is not yet available as those payments, as well as payments for 11 of the 21 covered commodities, have yet to be processed.
Debating Government Payments for Farmers
 
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From VOA Learning English, this is the Agriculture Report. The United States Congress has been debating a new Farm Bill. This is a huge five-year plan that includes support programs for American farmers. Government payments make up eight percent of the income of farmers growing such major crops as maize, wheat, soybeans, cotton and peanuts. That eight percent is one of the lowest levels of support among developed countries. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development says the average among its members is 20 percent. One reason for the low payments is high global crop prices. The price supports, or subsidies, that pay farmers when prices are low have not been used very much recently.Grain prices are high. Farmers have earned record or near-record profits in the past few years. But they still receive about $5 billion every year in what are called direct payments. These payments go to farmers whether crop prices are high or low. Farmers do not even have to grow a crop to get direct payments. Now, Congress wants to cut between $20 and $40 billion from farm subsidies. Even the largest farmers' group, the American Farm Bureau Federation, expects that direct payments will end soon. Mary Kay Thatcher is the chief lobbyist for the group. She says the payments are hard to justify politically. But there are proposals to increase subsidies once crop prices go down again. One version would let farmers receive payments with higher market prices. Another would protect a farmer's total income when prices fall. David Orden is an economist with the International Food Policy Institute. He says both versions would anger farmers in other countries. For VOA Learning English, I'm Laurel Bowman.
GODAN Webinar - Unlocking the Potential of Blockchain for Agriculture - 23/01/19
 
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Blockchain technology has the potential to provide answers to a number of issues in agriculture, from farmer IDs to smart contracts, from traceability and improving certification, digital payments, insurance, consumer feedback and improved logistics. For example, to improve traceability in agriculture value chains, a decentralized ledger can help to connect inputs, suppliers, producers and buyers. Blockchain and Open Data share similar principles such as the promotion of transparency, equality in information knowledge and access, as well as the reorganisation of data exchange between a number of parties. Blockchain can be very useful to help overcome organisational and technological boundaries between entities that want to automate the exchange of data. It provides strong data security and is highly resilient against cyber-attacks. Both these qualities are desirable in open data platforms because they build a foundation of trust in the data. In this webinar, Chris Addison, Senior Programme Coordinator, CTA and Jaclyn Bolt, Business Innovator, Wageningen University & Research, gave an overview of blockchain and introduced the possible areas of impact for Agriculture, with example cases. The webinar will also highlight capacities which people working with data need, to engage with blockchain. N.B. Blockchain can be a difficult concept to grasp in a short presentation, therefore for a better experience, we recommend you get a basic understanding of how blockhain technologies work, prior. Here is a good video which explains the concept at various levels. Blockchain Expert Explains One Concept in 5 Levels of Difficulty https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYip_Vuv8J0
Views: 289 CTA
Outlook for Crop Farm Income, Cash Rents, Farmland Prices, and Agricultural Credit
 
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This webinar covered farm income estimates for 2017 based on current projections of prices, yields, and ARC-CO payments. Forecasts were made on 2018 cash rents and farmland prices based on a survey of Illinois Society of Professional Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers. An update of agricultural credit conditions was given.
Views: 1718 farmdoc illinois
Senate Passes Agriculture, Housing Funding Bill
 
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A Senate plan to infuse $220 million dollars into Minnesota agencies and programs that support the state's agriculture and housing industries was passed by the Senate on Thursday, March 30. Bill sponsor Torrey Westrom, R-Elbow Lake, said the bill focuses on growing the agriculture industry and addressing workforce housing shortages in rural areas. The bill increases funding for the Agriculture Growth, Research and Innovation Program by $4.6 million dollars. It offers $600,000 in grants to help agricultural communities fight the spread of noxious weeks, including Palmer amaranth. For housing, the bill dedicates $1.2 million dollars for grants designed to develop housing in rural areas where industries struggle to maintain workers due to limited living options. Furthermore, the bill allocates $1 million dollars to a fund helping families with the ability to pay mortgage payments secure down payments for purchasing a home. Another $1 million dollars is directed to communities hoping to improve their manufactured home parks.
mSTAR uses DFS to boost the agricultural sector in Bangladesh.
 
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Bangladesh has one of the fastest growing economies in the world, and since 2011 when mobile financial services were introduced, Bangladesh has seen a massive uptake. The mSTAR Project is capitalizing on the popularity of mobile financial services to strengthen the agricultural sector and improve farmers' economic resilience. USAID can help missions and partners identify specific challenges in value chains and corresponding DFS solutions to increase digital financial inclusion for smallholder farmers. Digital financial services help USAID projects run more efficiently and allow farmers to connect to the financial ecosystem, giving them tools to support their economic livelihoods long after the projects have ended. This video was produced by DDC International.
Views: 2030 mSTAR Project
2018 Farm Bill: Commodity Titles and Wildlife — Agriculture Today — December 18, 2018
 
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On today’s episode: a discussion of discuss the commodity title changes in the 2018 Farm Bill, which awaits final approval; agricultural news, and the latest “Milk Lines”; how the Farm Bill could impact wildlife conservation and management… Agriculture Today is a daily program featuring Kansas State University agricultural specialists and other experts examining ag issues facing Kansas and the nation. It is hosted by Eric Atkinson and distributed to radio stations throughout Kansas and as a daily podcast. 00:01:30 – Commodity Titles in the 2018 Farm Bill: K-State agricultural economists Robin Reid and Mykel Taylor discuss the commodity title changes in the 2018 Farm Bill which awaits final approval, focusing mostly on the "safety net" provisions in the form of the ARC and PLC payments...they highlight the new payment program flexibility that is now built in, and the important changes in how the actual payments are determined. 00:13:00 – Commodity Titles in the 2018 Farm Bill (Part 2): Continued discussion with K-State agricultural economists Robin Reid and Mykel Taylor… they talk about a new calculation tool they're putting together for producers to use for their ARC and PLC decisions starting in 2019. 00:24:29 – Ag News: Eric Atkinson covers the day's agricultural news headlines, along with this week's edition of "Milk Lines." 00:33:00 – Wildlife Conservation in the 2018 Farm Bill: K-State wildlife specialist Charlie Lee looks at the features in the new farm bill that pertain directly and indirectly to wildlife conservation and management. Send comments, questions or requests for copies of past programs to [email protected] K‑State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well‑being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K‑State campus in Manhattan.
EU Agriculture- CAP- Protect Environment
 
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http://ec.europa.eu/agriculture/cap-for-our-roots/index_en.htm Making agriculture greener and more efficient · Encouraging better use of natural resources to tackle climate change and safeguard biodiversity. 30% of direct payments and 30% of rural development funding will be linked to sustainable production methods. There will be specific aid for organic farming. · Doubling funding for research, innovation and knowledge-sharing including through a new European Innovation Partnership. This encourages closer cooperation between scientists and farmers, helping them modernise and produce more, with less, and better.
Views: 6756 European Commission
Farm Bill 2014: What they got right and wrong
 
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By Adam Bauer & Claire Hofius, Macalester College Minnesota is a big agricultural player, with 50% of the state's land used for farming. The food and agriculture industry is the state's 2nd largest employer, with rural communities heavily dependent on farm income. When it comes to the population as a whole, a number of folks who live nowhere near a farm also benefit from the Farm Bill, with 80% of its funding allocated to nutritional programs like SNAP and WIC. The Farm Bill has the potential to affect the livelihood and food security of many Minnesotans, and despite its flaws, Minnesotan farm advocates and policy leaders believe that the agricultural system will benefit from this new legislation. The 2014 Farm Bill has made some substantial changes for farmers, moving away from a direct payment system to increased dependence on crop insurance. In the direct payment system, landowners received a fixed per-acre payment, regardless of crop prices or even if they didn't plant at all.Instead farmers will take part in a program that looks to increase the level of risk management over time. $94.6 billion will be allocated for crop insurance over the next ten years. This means that farmers will only receive payments if they have poor crop years as a result of drought, flooding, etc. or if prices fall below a certain point. Others in farming criticize the plan saying that most of the new payments will go to a few select farmers, and that it will hurt smaller, family-run operations. Those a few steps removed from the farm are also unhappy $8.6 billion in cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps). Some of the 46 million monthly participants still struggle with food security. These cuts could result in a loss of 3.2 billion meals over the next decade. In Minnesota, the SNAP program benefitted 551,040 in November, 2013 alone. The Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy's Ben Lilliston agrees that it's definitely a problem for the growing number of working age Americans who rely on SNAP. However, there is an alternative program states can access to recoup a portion of lost funding. The farm bill also fell short in making needed reforms in how we grow food to be more environmentally sustainable, continuing heavy subsidies for conventional agricultural systems. Reform does not happen overnight. While we have time to work toward the next farm bill, let's promote sustainable, biodiverse, and smaller farms. Let's make immediately consumable food more accessible for all by boosting supplemental nutrition programs. Not only should you vote with your dollar by supporting small, local farms, but get active in working for real change in the next farm bill. Work to convince policymakers it's in our collective best interest to encourage more public investment in expanding fresh, local food. Policy change that reflects these values will benefit both Minnesotan producers and consumers.
Views: 79 Minnesota 2020

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