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Breakthrough in  Nuclear Fusion? - Prof. Dennis Whyte
 
01:38:49
Nuclear fusion is the holy grail of energy generation because by fusing two hydrogen atoms together into a single helium atom it releases enormous amounts of energy, yet represents a clean, safe, sustainable and secure form of power. The most tried and true approach for generating nuclear fusion energy has been a tokamak fusion reactor, which uses very high density magnetic fields to compress and contain a plasma to 100 million degrees. But none has been able to generate more electricity than it consumes. Until now. Director Whyte will describe the ARC nuclear fusion reactor (shown above right), based on a new superconducting material, for achieving very high density magnetic fields. It will be used as a research center, but could ultimately become a prototype for an inexpensive 200MW power plant, vaulting nuclear fusion from scientific curiosity to potential commercialization. The ARC reactor is being designed to produce at least 3 times the power required to run it, which has never been done before and is the result of several new technologies which dramatically reduce the size and cost. The biggest breakthrough is a new superconducting material which produces a much higher magnetic field density, yielding a ten-fold increase in fusion power per volume. Molten salt will be used as a liquid cooling blanket for fast heat transfer and easy maintenance. And 3D printing techniques will allow the fabrication of reactor components in shapes that cannot be made by milling machines. The result is a much smaller, lower cost and highly efficient modular power plant with zero emissions and abundant fuel. Dennis Whyte, recently promoted to run MIT’s Nuclear Science and Engineering Department and Director of MIT’s Plasma Science & Fusion Center, works in magnetic fusion and specializes in the interface between the plasma and materials. Dennis received his PhD from the Universite du Quebec in 1993. A Fellow of the American Physical Society, Dennis was awarded the Department of Energy’s Plasma Physics Junior Faculty Award in 2003 and won the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Nuclear Fusion Prize in 2013. He is a two-time winner of the MIT Joel and Ruth Spira Award for teaching excellence. Among his many lectures on fusion energy research, Dennis was an invited speaker at CERAWeek and the National Science Foundation’s Engineering Distinguished Lecturer in 2015.
FAT Chance - Dr. Robert Lustig
 
01:19:43
Join Dr. Robert Lustig as he presents his New York Times best-seller, FAT Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease. His book illuminates the causes of obesity and challenges the dogma, "a calorie is a calorie." As our nation becomes wealthier, have we become healthier and wiser? Dr. Lustig's book stimulates us to re-evaluate our role as consumers of sugar and shocks us with a sharp bite on the consequences of fructose. As a sugar crusader, Dr. Lustig will talk about the mismatch between our environment and our science, business and politics that has fueled the pandemic of chronic disease over the last three decades. More importantly, he will share strategies to re-adjust key hormones that regulate hunger, reward, and stress. So, take the journey into the biochemistry of your brain and fat cells in order to help you and your family get healthy, no matter your size, in a palatable manner. "Your fat is not your fate -- provided you don't surrender!" Robert Lustig, MD, MSL, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology, at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and President, Institute for Responsible Nutrition (IRN) Dr. Lustig is a nationally-recognized authority in neuroendocrinology. His research investigates the contribution of biochemical, neural, hormonal, and genetic influences in the expression of the current obesity epidemic in adults and children. As an author of over 70 research articles and 35 chapters, he has also appeared in Sugar: The Bitter Truth and The Colbert Report. Dr. Lustig graduated from MIT, and received his MD from Cornell University, and just this month received a Masters of Studies in Law from UC Hastings College of the Law. He completed his pediatric residency at St. Louis Children's Hospital, clinical fellowship at UCSF, and post-doctoral fellowship in neuroendocrinology at The Rockefeller University in New York.
The Impending Revolution in Transportation - Dr. Stefan Heck
 
01:46:24
Have you driven the freeways around the Bay Area lately, wondering how we will ever get out of this mess? Commute traffic continues to worsen. Car pooling and HOV lanes have not worked. Light rail has not worked. BART is expanding but has limited coverage. What hope is there? Dr. Stefan Heck, co-Founder & CEO of Nauto, a Palo Alto-based autonomous vehicle software company, will kick off a new series on the Future of Transportation in the Bay Area, produced by the MIT Club of Northern California’s Energy & Environment team. Dr. Heck, a true visionary and a dynamic speaker, believes that a convergence of innovative new technologies, consisting of autonomous driving, vehicle sharing, connectedness and rapid growth of electric vehicles will create a revolution in how today’s current single car drivers will view their transportation options in the near future and that, although implementation will sometimes be challenging, there is room for cautious optimism in the Bay Area and elsewhere. Stefan Heck is CEO and co-Founder of Nauto, a Palo Alto-based autonomous vehicle technology company. Nauto connects fleet managers, insurers, commercial vehicles and drivers through a deep learning platform that makes roads safer and helps businesses run more effectively. At Nauto’s core is a perpetually learning artificial intelligence system and network which learns from drivers and events in real time, allowing drivers to stay one step ahead and gain a precise, comprehensive view of driving activity and behavior. Until recently, he was Consulting Professor at the Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford University, teaching courses and conducting research on innovation, energy and resource economics. Previously he was a Senior Partner at McKinsey and co-founded and led their Cleantech and Sustainability practice, working with many large companies globally. He is on the Board of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group and is an angel investor in disruptive technology companies. He received his PhD in Cognitive Science from UCSD and a BS with honors in symbolic systems from Stanford University, focusing his research on deep learning.
Pioneers in Clean Technology - Marc Tarpenning - Tesla Motors
 
01:43:23
Please join us at one of our two convenient locations for this exciting new series which will explore the challenges faced by founders and CEOs of well-known clean tech companies, who will describe the early years of their company. Aimed at entrepreneurs who want to hear "what it was like" from someone who experienced it, our speakers will describe financing, legal, technical and market-related issues and how they dealt with them.
Grid Storage for Renewables Integration
 
01:48:06
Kelly Warner – President, Advanced Microgrid Solutions Todd Strauss – Senior Director, PG&E Kate McGinnis – Market Director, AES Energy Storage Barry Cinnamon – CEO, Cinnamon Energy Systems Moderator: Jeff Byron, Band of Angels What will it take in terms of megawatts of energy storage and dollars to flatten the belly of the famous duck curve in California and meet the 2030 RPS goals? What storage solutions will prevail - customer-side, behind the meter or utility scale, in front of the meter,? What are the costs and benefits of each type of solution? In mid-May California broke a record on one day with 67% of its power being generated by renewable sources of electricity on the portion of the grid controlled by the CAISO. While this is a major achievement, sustaining this level of renewable power generation from a variety of sources is a challenge. California is a leader not only in renewable energy sources but also in energy storage. It has one of the country’s highest renewable portfolio standards requiring 50% of its energy generation to be powered by renewable resources by 2030. Currently at 27% of our electricity coming from renewable sources, we are ahead of our RPS goals of meeting 33% renewables by 2020. The electric grid is a complex system in which energy supply and demand must always match at any given time. Since renewable sources like wind and solar are subject to variability, energy storage helps to smooth out the differences between energy supply and demand. It stores excess energy when supply exceeds demand, and dispatches energy when demand exceeds supply. Today’s energy storage companies are going a step further by not only providing backup power to customers or the grid but also providing the ability to respond instantaneously to the utility grid needs. This combination of flexibility and ability to dispatch is a valuable asset. Until recently, the cost of energy storage has been prohibitive, but battery prices have been declining rapidly in recent years and are projected to continue to decline with technology improvements and manufacturing scale. Note: While other storage technologies are also being developed, this discussion will focus on chemical batteries, which are by far the most common.
Vitamin and Mineral Inadequacy Accelerates Aging - Professor Bruce Ames, UCB
 
01:29:27
Can a poor diet be just as bad as smoking cigarettes for your health? What can we do to protect our DNA and minimize the effects of aging and chronic disease? Professor Bruce Ames, from University of California, Berkeley, the inventor of the “Ames test” —a simple assay for detecting DNA mutagens, knows a thing or two about carcinogens. He helped establish the first evidence that carcinogens mutate DNA and then helped create a catalog of mutagens, including cigarette smoke, permanent hair dye (aromatic amines), and flame retardant used in children’s pajamas (tris-BP). Professor Ames developed a theory that DNA damage and late onset disease are a consequence of a"triage mechanism" developed during evolution to cope with periods of micronutrient shortage. Hear about the discoveries supporting his hypothesis which explains why diseases associated with aging, cancer, heart disease, and dementia, may be unintended consequences developed during evolution to protect us from immediate harm.
Does Solar + Storage = Grid 2.0?
 
01:49:59
Solar is getting cheaper, and battery storage seems to be on the same rapid cost reduction curve. Solar and storage – combined with the right software and policies – will be a key part of the electric grid of the future. But there are technical and business challenges as we transition from the Grid 1.0 infrastructure of power plants and power lines to a more distributed Grid 2.0. What does Grid 2.0 look like? Who pays for it, who owns it, who controls it? As batteries get cheaper, what supporting technologies will be required? Who will provide the software to coordinate the grid with local solar/storage & customer demand? What policy changes will be needed to incentivize utilities, resource providers and customers? Please join us for a lively panel discussion with solar, storage and utility industry leaders as they describe how their products and services will help build Grid 2.0. Christopher Johns – PG&E Co. Vice Chairman and former President Mateo Jaramillo – Tesla Director of Stationary Storage Jack Peurach – SunPower EVP Products Raghu Belur – Enphase VP Products and Strategy
Cold Fusion - Real, But Is It Ready? - Prof. Peter Hagelstein
 
01:47:21
Since 1988 when Professors Fleischmann & Pons from University of Utah first discovered “cold fusion”, there has been controversy as to whether the effect was an experimental artifact or whether it could be used to provide safe and inexpensive clean energy. The results claimed were not in agreement with the then-known laws of physics and skeptics drew attention to the many early negative experimental results to argue that the experiment could not be replicated. When their early experiments couldn’t be validated, most researchers concluded F&P’s results were “junk science”—and there has subsequently been little government sponsored research in the US. Nevertheless, over the last 30 years, researchers around the world have found out why the initial results weren’t easily duplicated and some experimental configurations have been consistently able to generate net power. Largely ignored by the traditional physics establishment in the US, research efforts continue in Japan, China, Russia, India and Italy, with governmental support ramping up in Japan. Cold fusion experiments produce little of the dangerous reaction products (neurons, gamma rays, or radioactive isotopes) that are seen in fission or traditional fusion reactions. Furthermore, the conditions necessary for cold fusion are modest compared to traditional hot fusion or fission, supporting much lower cost, high energy density implementations. So, even though it has been demonstrated to be relatively safe and inexpensive to implement, the phenomenon is not theoretically understood yet and much work remains to convert experimental results to useful products. Professor Hagelstein will trace the early history of cold fusion, highlighting important results and implications along the way. He will then review the theoretical issues and present his own model of what is going on, followed by a discussion of an experimental effort to test the model, with some preliminary results. Finally, he will discuss what he considers to be the necessary future directions in order to achieve commercialization. Peter L. Hagelstein is a principal investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) and an associate professor at MIT. He received a BS and MS degree in 1976, then his PhD in Electrical Engineering in 1981, all from MIT. He was a staff member of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 1981 to 1985 before joining the MIT faculty in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 1986. Hagelstein's early work focused on extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray lasers, receiving the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award in 1984 for his innovation in X-ray laser physics. While working at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory he pioneered the work that later produced the first X-ray laser, which helped stimulate the US Strategic Defense Initiative (“Star Wars”) program. In 1989 he started investigating cold fusion (also called low-energy nuclear reactions) and has written more than 50 papers on cold fusion while collaborating with key experimental researchers in the field. Hagelstein is the co-author of the textbook Applied Quantum and Statistical Mechanics and chaired the Tenth International Conference on Cold Fusion in 2003.
The Future of U.S. Solar Photovoltaic Technology - Tonio Buonassisi
 
01:15:45
The solar photovoltaic (PV) industry continues to grow, despite intense international competition and recent margin compression. Can innovation in technology and manufacturing allow American companies to compete and ultimately thrive in this huge but challenging market? Professor Buonassisi will address these questions as he explores the outlook for American PV cell and module suppliers. He will begin by using an industry-validated bottoms-up cost model to compare the cost-reduction potentials of various innovative PV technologies, and how their successful development could influence manufacturing location decisions. He will also describe recent progress toward these innovative technologies, highlighting the new computational and experimental tools that have accelerated the cycle of discovery and product development — providing "sneak peeks" at the technologies that may grace rooftops in years to come. He will conclude by showcasing recent success stories of U.S. innovation. Join us as Professor Buonassisi explains how technology innovation will open up pathways for success in the U.S. solar PV industry. Tonio Buonassisi, MIT Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, heads an interdisciplinary research laboratory focused on photovoltaics (PV). He completed his Ph.D. in Applied Science & Technology at UC Berkeley, with additional research at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems and the Max-Planck-Institute for Microstructure Physics. He is author of over a hundred journal papers, and co-developer of a dedicated course on photovoltaics. Prof. Buonassisi invents, develops, and applies defect-engineering techniques over the entire solar cell process, from crystal growth to modules, improving the cost effectiveness of commercial and next-generation solar cells. Several of his PV innovations have been implemented in industry, including key contributions leading to the founding of solar start-ups and a research institute.
The Materials Genome Initiative - Gerbrand Ceder
 
01:16:57
Novel materials design has become a critical capability to address several urgent societal problems. The Materials Genome Project, originally started at MIT (materialsproject.com), has as its objective to use high-throughput first principles computations on an unparalleled scale to provide basic materials property data on all known and many potential new inorganic compounds, thereby accelerating the search for new materials. Professor Ceder will show successful examples of high-throughput calculations in the field of lithium batteries, and show several new materials that have been discovered. He will discuss the public release version of the Materials Genome project, which is making large quantities of computed data freely available to the materials community. Gerbrand Ceder is a Professor of Materials Science & Engineering at MIT. He received an engineering degree from the University of Leuven, Belgium, and a Ph.D. in Materials Science from the University of California at Berkeley in 1991. Dr. Ceder's research interests lie in the design of novel materials for energy generation and storage, including battery materials, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, and photocatalysts. He has worked for 18 years in the Li-battery field, optimizing several new electrodes materials and has regularly served as scientific advisor to companies and investors in this area. He has published over 300 scientific papers, and holds several U.S. patents. He has served on MIT's Energy Council as well as on several Department of Energy committees, including the workgroup preparing the Basic Needs for Electrical Energy Storage report. He has received the MRS Gold Medal, the Battery Research Award from the Electrochemical Society for his work on understanding battery materials, the Career Award from the National Science Foundation, and the Robert Lansing Hardy Award from The Metals, Minerals and Materials Society. He is a co-founder of Computational Modeling Consultants, Pellion Technologies, and The Materials Project. Dr. Ceder's work on high-throughput computing was the inspiration of the Presidential Materials Genome Initiative.
Cancer Genetics and Precision Cancer Therapy - Life Sciences Forum
 
01:43:45
Please join us as MITCNC hosts the second Bay Area with/in/sight lecture series from the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT. We invite you to enjoy the networking reception, mingle with fellow guests and scientists, and join us for a series of informative talks about recent exciting progress in the areas of cancer genetics and new treatments based on our understanding of cancer genes. The event will showcase research from MIT's Dr. Tyler Jacks, PhD, David H. Koch Professor of Biology, Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and Director of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. Professor Jacks will discuss work from his laboratory on the development of novel therapeutic strategies that target common genetic alterations in many human cancers. Dr. Jacks will be joined by Dr. Kevin Shannon, MD, who is the Roma and Marvin Auerback Distinguished Professor in Pediatric Oncology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Shannon, a physician-scientist, will discuss the challenges and opportunities of new cancer medicines from a clinical perspective. Rounding out the program will be Dr. Jeffrey Settleman, PhD. Dr. Settleman is Senior Director of Discovery Oncology at Genentech. He will present research from his own laboratory at Genentech as well as review new cancer therapeutic programs at the company. The panel discussion will be moderated by Dr. Laura D. Attardi, PhD, an Associate Professor in the Departments of Radiation Oncology & Genetics, at Stanford University School of Medicine.
Plant-based Meat Has Arrived! - Part 2 - Impossible Testimonials
 
07:40
This is disruptive technology. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjW2vNVZIhE Dr. Patrick Brown: ”Impossible Foods began in 2011 with an ambitious goal: To drastically reduce humanity’s destructive impact on the global environment by completely replacing the use of animals as a food production technology. We intend to accomplish this mission within two decades by creating the world’s most delicious, nutritious, affordable and sustainable meat, fish and dairy foods directly from plants.” We will be serving Impossible Burgers for dinner, so come try them for yourself. They feel and taste like the real thing - in fact, these burgers even bleed when cooked! A quarter pound Impossible Burger with 20 grams of protein from wheat, coconut oil and potatoes uses 95% less land, 74% less water, and creates 87% less greenhouse gas emissions than a burger produced from a cow. In fact, animal agriculture uses 30% of all land, over 25% of all freshwater on Earth, and creates as much greenhouse gas emissions as all of the world’s cars, trucks, trains, ships, and airplanes combined. Is this the key to feeding a world that will need 70% more food by 2050? The global plant based protein (PBP) market is expected to reach $11 billion by 2022. No longer a fringe market, even large meat producers like Tysons Foods, Nestle and Cargill have invested in clean or plant based meat companies. In fact, Tyson CEO Tom Hayes, believes that 20 percent of “meat” will come from clean or plant based meats in 25 years. Dr. Brown will discuss his journey from medical student to coinventor of DNA microarrays to Stanford biochemistry professor to founder of Impossible Foods. He will discuss how heme (as in hemoglobin) from genetically modified yeast is the key to the meat-like taste. Impossible also uses a gas chromatography mass spectrometer system to analyze and then reproduce the other flavors in meat from plant based sources. With all the other veggie burgers out there, why did Dr. Brown decide that he needed to make one that tastes and feels like meat? What are the regulatory and marketing battles he’s faced? What’s next after the Impossible Burger? Pat Brown was trained as a pediatrician at the University of Chicago, where he received his BS, MD and PhD. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2002 and is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Before founding Impossible Foods, he was Professor of Biochemistry at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the American Cancer Society Medal of Honor and the NAS Award in Molecular Biology. Pat Brown is also a co-founder of the Public Library of Science (PLOS), a nonprofit publisher of open-access scientific and medical research.
Distributed Energy Generation - Future or Fantasy?
 
01:38:42
Please join us at Silicon Valley Bank for an exploration of the efficacy of distributed energy generation in California based on regional policy and the economics of proposed solutions. Dian Grueneich -- ex-CPUC Commissioner Bryan Hannegan -- Vice President, EPRI Craig Lewis -- Exec Director, Clean Coalition Dave Ruben -- Director, Pacific Gas & Electric Moderator: Eric Wesoff, Green Tech Media As part of California's 33% renewable electricity portfolio standard, Governor Brown established a goal of 12,000 MW of renewable generation at customer sites, e.g. roof-top solar, or connected to the lower voltage electrical grid. These Distributed Generation (DG) facilities avoid some of the permitting and capacity problems of large-scale, transmission-connected projects and offer reduced electrical losses, avoidance of new substations, easier permitting, and local economic benefits. However, the electrical distribution system of today was not designed from either a technical or regulatory perspective for two-way power flows. As the Smart Grid is implemented many technical issues will be resolved, but other questions regarding access to the grid and establishing fair and sustainable rates for users of the distribution grid will remain.
Autonomous Vehicles - What Will It Take To Go Mainstream?
 
23:27
Two illustrious MIT alums - a politician who led the regulation of autonomous vehicles in the State Senate and a businessman who leads Waymo's effort - share their vision! Alex Padilla - CA Secretary of State John Krafcik - CEO Waymo Moderator: Jake Seid MIT '98 - Private Investor Autonomous vehicle technologies will dramatically change how we interact with vehicles; McKinsey estimates that 50 percent of new cars in 2030 could be highly autonomous. Laws and guidelines are being established at the state and federal level, but significant uncertainty still exists. Policy: What major policies or regulations have advanced the autonomous vehicle industry and what are the real & perceived issues that policy must now address? Markets: What are the early market opportunities and challenges, given policy and technology limitations? Where are the greatest opportunities for entrepreneurs? Business Models: What kinds of new business models will accelerate the adoption of AVs? How will the role of the traditional OEM evolve? The speakers will each give keynote introductions sharing how they got involved in the autonomous industry, how it has developed during this time and their vision for the future.
Future of the Electric Grid
 
01:33:35
Speakers: MIT Prof. John Kassakian, MIT Sloan Prof. Dick Schmalensee What key technologies will drive the evolution of the grid in the coming decades? What state & federal policies are necessary for efficient development & deployment? Our current electric grid is fairly robust and efficient, but will need to change significantly in the next 20 years to meet the emerging opportunities and challenges of distributed & large scale renewable energy generation, emergence of electric vehicles, dynamic retail pricing, interregional system planning and data communications privacy & security. Profs. Kassakian & Schmalensee, co-leaders of the newly released MIT study, The Future of the Electric Grid, will present its findings on the challenges facing our grid and the recommended technologies and government policies required to meet them. Biographies Dr. John Kassakianis an MIT Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and former Director of the MIT Laboratory for Electromagnetic and Electronic Systems. He is the Founding President of the IEEE Power Electronics Society, and is the recipient of the IEEE Centennial Medal, the IEEE William E. Newell Award, the IEEE Power Electronics Society's Distinguished Service Award, and the IEEE Millennium Medal. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. John has published extensively in the areas of power electronics and is a co-author of the textbook Principles of Power Electronics. He is a consultant to industry and government and serves on the boards of several public companies and ISO-NE, the operator of the New England power grid. Dr. Richard Schmalensee is MIT's Howard W. Johnson Professor of Economics & Management , a member of the MIT Energy Council, and Director of the MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research. He served as the Dean of the MIT Sloan School of Management from 1998 through 2007 and was a Member of the President's Council of Economic Advisers with primary responsibility for energy and environmental policy from 1989 through 1991. Professor Schmalensee has published 11 books and more than 120 articles; his work focuses on industrial organization economics and its policy applications. Dick has served as a member of the National Commission on Energy Policy, the Executive Committee of the American Economic Association, and the EPA's Environmental Economics Advisory Committee.
Hydraulic Fracturing: Boon or Bane? - George King, P.E.
 
01:25:33
How does hydraulic fracturing work? Can chemicals in fracturing fluid contaminate fresh water supplies? Can we recycle all the waste water and other fluids from fracturing? What can prevent methane escaping into the atmosphere? Can fracturing cause earthquakes? How might focusing on the real risks shift the regulatory discussion? The Monterey Shale deposit in California is estimated to hold 15.4 billion barrels of oil, making it the largest shale deposit in the U.S. Since 2011, 1,250+ wells have been drilled and completed using hydraulic fracturing. Earlier this year, Governor Brown signed into law the controversial bill SB4 that allows oil and gas companies to continue with fracking in California, but under tight regulation. Critics worry about water and air pollution and the worsening effects on global warming, while the oil and gas industry touts the benefits that hydraulic fracturing will bring to the California economy. So - is this a good thing or a bad thing? Come hear George King describe the real risks of hydraulic fracturing so that we can steer the conversation in the right direction. George E. King is a registered professional engineer in multiple states with 42 years of worldwide oil and gas industry experience in most aspects of well construction and failure analysis. His work has focused on fracturing, well construction risk analysis, unconventional formations, sand control, and perforating. George holds a Chemistry degree from Oklahoma State University and a BS in Chemical Engineering and an MS in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Tulsa. He was awarded the 2012 Engineer of the Year from the Texas Society of Professional Engineers and the 2004 Society of Petroleum Engineers Production Operations Award. He has written 68 technical papers, journal articles and book chapters.
Reinventing America's Electricity System - Dr. Frank O'Sullivan, MITEI
 
01:45:03
Hear first-hand from the MITEI project leader of The Future of Solar and The Future of Natural Gas what tomorrow may look like! Today’s electricity sector is in a state of flux. Important questions are being asked by stakeholders up and down the value chain as to whether the technical and commercial paradigms that have defined the sector for a century are still relevant, and if not, how will tomorrow’s power system look? To what degree will greater customer engagement, new technologies and business models and evolving regulations yield a distinctly different-looking electricity business? MITEI’s Frank O’Sullivan will examine the rise of distributed energy resources and how these technologies can play a role in delivering cleaner, more cost effective and reliable energy services to the nation, while delivering greater value to end users. He will describe the technology gains that are opening up these new possibilities - including the rapidly falling cost of solar PV and battery storage and the increasing resolution of grid pricing and performance data, both temporal and spatial, highlighting the need for the much greater digitization of the power system and the challenge of paying for those assets. He will also examine the strengths and weaknesses of business model innovations that are bringing this change to the market, such as residential solar leasing and the role this plays in driving the development of new financial products including solar asset backed securities. He will cover the paradox that the successful deployment of clean low marginal cost energy assets tends to cannibalize their own competitiveness, impacting how a cleaner power system may be built. He will conclude with a discussion regarding the central role that business model innovation has played and will continue to play in transforming the power system, including where customer value lies and the challenges of financing the capital needs of the transformation. -------------------------------------------------------- Dr. Francis (Frank) O’Sullivan is Director of Research and Analysis for the MIT Energy Initiative, and a Senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management. His work is focused on the evolution of the electric power sector, particularly on the integration of large-scale solar and wind resources, advanced storage deployment and on how digitization is enabling operational optimization and the development of new business models. He was a Senior Advisor to the US Department of Energy’s 2017 Quadrennial Energy Review, and is a member of the National Academies’ Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability. Dr. O’Sullivan is also a Senior Associate with the Energy and National Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Prior to MIT, Frank was with McKinsey & Company. He is an electrical engineer by training, receiving his PhD, SM and EE degrees from MIT and his BE degree from the National University of Ireland.
Are Electric Vehicles at a Tipping Point?
 
01:30:06
Electric vehicles are set to overcome historic and significant hurdles: sticker price, range anxiety and limited model options. Annual sales are forecasted to jump from 1% today to 25% in 2030 and cross 50% by 2040. Nearly every major car maker has announced new models for EVs. By 2020, there will be 44 models of EVs available in North America. Sven Beiker – Moderator & Keynote Speaker, Stanford GSB Pat Romano – CEO, Chargepoint Fred Kim – R&D Group Manager, Daimler Benz Albert Liu – Director of Battery Technology, Lucid Motor Please join us for a lively panel discussion with diverse electric vehicle experts as they provide their take on the future of the industry and tackle tough questions like: What are the remaining technical, economic and political hurdles that will impact the mass adoption of EVs? Charging infrastructure vs EVs – the chicken and the egg problem. What’s the right amount and mix of charging infrastructure? Connected, Autonomous, Shared and Electric – How important is “electric” to this futuristic concept? When will EVs be cheaper to own than conventional internal combustion engine vehicles? Battery costs have fallen 74% since 2010 – what other technology opportunities exist i.e. new battery chemistry, economies of scale? China’s EV targets outpace Europe and the US. What are the implications for traditional automakers and Silicon Valley startups? California’s latest Executive Order targets 5 million EVs on the road by 2030. How do we get there?
The New Science of Radical Life Extension - David Ewing Duncan
 
01:24:50
How long do you want to live? 80 years, 120 years, 150 years, or forever are possible answers to this question that bestselling science writer David Ewing Duncan, the author of Experimental Man, asked 30,000 people in his new TED e-book, "When I'm 164: The New Science of Radical Life Extension, and What Happens If It Succeeds". While riffing on the Beatle's song "When I'm 164," the book surveys the increasingly legitimate science of radical life extension—from Healthy Living and Genetics to Regeneration and Machine Solutions—and considers the pluses and minuses of living to age 164, or beyond; everything from the impact on population and the cost of living to what happens to love, curiosity, and health. He shares classic stories and myths of people determined to defeat aging and death, and offers real-life tales of the techno-heroes and optimists who believe that technology can solve the "problem" of aging. Concluding that anti-aging technologies will probably succeed in the next 30-50 years despite his earlier skepticism, he brings us back to the age-old question: "will you still need me, will you still feed me, when I'm..." David Ewing Duncan, a best-selling author of eight books and an award-winning science journalist, is dedicated to exploring leading-edge science and technology, and its consequences in the present and in the future. A prolific writer, editor, commentator and television correspondent for NPR, ABC Nightline, NOVA, National Geographic, Wired, and many others, Duncan is famous for translating cutting-edge science and technology into provocative, accessible and entertaining content. He founded the Center for Life Science Policy at UC Berkeley to focus on studies and initiatives on topics ranging from personalized medicine to extending human lifespan; the politics of stem cells; and the integration of environmental studies with human bioscience. Duncan is also the Founder of the BioAgenda Institute, an independent, non-profit program of events and educational initiatives that discusses and analyzes crucial issues in life sciences. Duncan has always sought out stories and issues where clashes of ideas, cultures and discoveries occur. Chief Correspondent of NPR Talk's Biotech Nation and a former commentator for NPR's Morning Edition, Duncan is also a correspondent for Atlantic.com. He was a former contributing editor to Condé Nast Portfolio and was the "Natural Selection" science columnist for Portfolio.com. In addition, Duncan regularly contributes to National Geographic, Fortune, Wired, The New York Times, Atlantic Monthly, Smithsonian, and many others. He has won numerous awards including the Magazine Story of the Year from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His articles have twice been cited in nominations for National Magazine Awards, and his work has appeared twice in The Best American Science and Nature Writing.
Plant-based Meat Has Arrived! - Part 1 - An Impossible Presentation
 
01:00:11
This is disruptive technology. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjW2vNVZIhE Dr. Patrick Brown: ”Impossible Foods began in 2011 with an ambitious goal: To drastically reduce humanity’s destructive impact on the global environment by completely replacing the use of animals as a food production technology. We intend to accomplish this mission within two decades by creating the world’s most delicious, nutritious, affordable and sustainable meat, fish and dairy foods directly from plants.” We will be serving Impossible Burgers for dinner, so come try them for yourself. They feel and taste like the real thing - in fact, these burgers even bleed when cooked! A quarter pound Impossible Burger with 20 grams of protein from wheat, coconut oil and potatoes uses 95% less land, 74% less water, and creates 87% less greenhouse gas emissions than a burger produced from a cow. In fact, animal agriculture uses 30% of all land, over 25% of all freshwater on Earth, and creates as much greenhouse gas emissions as all of the world’s cars, trucks, trains, ships, and airplanes combined. Is this the key to feeding a world that will need 70% more food by 2050? The global plant based protein (PBP) market is expected to reach $11 billion by 2022. No longer a fringe market, even large meat producers like Tysons Foods, Nestle and Cargill have invested in clean or plant based meat companies. In fact, Tyson CEO Tom Hayes, believes that 20 percent of “meat” will come from clean or plant based meats in 25 years. Dr. Brown will discuss his journey from medical student to coinventor of DNA microarrays to Stanford biochemistry professor to founder of Impossible Foods. He will discuss how heme (as in hemoglobin) from genetically modified yeast is the key to the meat-like taste. Impossible also uses a gas chromatography mass spectrometer system to analyze and then reproduce the other flavors in meat from plant based sources. With all the other veggie burgers out there, why did Dr. Brown decide that he needed to make one that tastes and feels like meat? What are the regulatory and marketing battles he’s faced? What’s next after the Impossible Burger? Pat Brown was trained as a pediatrician at the University of Chicago, where he received his BS, MD and PhD. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2002 and is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Before founding Impossible Foods, he was Professor of Biochemistry at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the American Cancer Society Medal of Honor and the NAS Award in Molecular Biology. Pat Brown is also a co-founder of the Public Library of Science (PLOS), a nonprofit publisher of open-access scientific and medical research.
Residential Solar: Is the Market Ready to Explode?
 
01:48:30
The residential rooftop solar market is growing rapidly in California without state incentives. Across the country solar is becoming more cost competitive with the grid, spurring a boom in deployment. Yet costs in the US - see chart below - remain dramatically higher than elsewhere (residential rooftop solar prices in Germany are half of those in the U.S. and the DOE's SunShot goals are even more aggressive) and higher than they need to be to achieve truly broad acceptance. Please join us on September 26th to hear from the CEOs and advocates who enable this revolution as they discuss the next steps in bringing solar to every roof. Tom Werner -- CEO, SunPower, Paul Nahi -- CEO, Enphase, Andrew Birch -- CEO, Sungevity, Nicholas Lazares - Chairman & CEO, Admirals Bank, Susannah Churchill -- CA Policy Advocate, Vote Solar, Moderator: Barry Cinnamon -- Former CEO, Akeena/Westinghouse Solar
The Great Energy Debate
 
02:05:05
It’s an election year. Are you tired of the insults and focus on personalities rather than matters of substance? Do you want to hear about and discuss energy policy facts, alternatives, pros & cons? Then come to our informed and professional discussion about where energy policy should go. This distinguished panel of policy experts from four parties (Republicans, Democrats, Libertarians & Greens) will present and discuss their view of government policy (subsidies, incentives, taxes & regulation) in areas such as energy security, generation, efficiency, distribution, storage and transportation. Subsidies for renewables & EVs: how much and for how long? What role should policy play with respect to storage? Cap & trade vs carbon tax? How to maintain the grid? High speed rail? Nuclear? Please join us for a lively panel discussion with energy experts as they provide their take on the best policy alternatives going forward. Nancy Pfund (Dem) – Founder & Managing Partner, DBL Ventures Jim Sweeney (Rep) – Director, Stanford Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Josh Miller (Libertarian) – EVP & Country GM, Zapper Mark Roest (Green) – Energy Entrepreneur - SeaWave Battery, ex-Intel Moderator: Jeff Byron – CA Energy Commissioner (2006-11), NRG, EPRI Co-sponsored by the Energy Interest Group of the Band of Angels
Is There a Micro-grid in Your Future?
 
01:56:29
How are utilities taking advantage of lower equipment costs? What policies do we need to streamline this transition and reduce costs? What software & communications capabilities will interface with the grid? What is the potential for US manufacturing? Please join us for a lively panel discussion with top solar, storage, policy and utility industry leaders to get their insights into the transition from centrally generated power to business and residential microgrids. Bernadette del Chiaro – Executive Director, CA Solar & Storage Assn Peter Gibson – VP of Energy Storage, LG Chem Lior Handlesman – Co-Founder, SolarEdge Jan Pepper – CEO, Peninsula Clean Energy Moderator: Barry Cinnamon – CEO, Cinnamon Energy Systems
TIM Talk: AI in Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and Gaming - MITCNC Tech Conference 2017
 
20:34
Speaker: Danny Lange, Vice President of AI and ML, Unity Technologies
The Economics of Fossil Fuels & Climate Change Policy - Christopher Knittel
 
01:34:26
Christopher Knittel - MIT Sloan School of Management - Professor of Applied Economics - Director, MIT Center for Energy & Environmental Policy Research What unique features of climate change make action on it so difficult? Can we rely on “peak oil” to reduce our dependency on fossil fuels? What policies are most effective at reducing CO2 emissions? History is full of policy makers from both the US and the world coming together to solve environmental problems. In the 1990s, the US successfully reduced both sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions, greatly reducing the ill effects of acid rain and smog pollution. These reductions largely came from cleaner power plants and vehicles and shifting away from high-sulfur coal and fuels. In 1987, the world came together to solve the hole in the ozone layer. These environmental successes relied on both regulating fossil fuels and international agreements---the very same requirements for making headway in solving climate change. Despite this, the US and the world have made little progress in solving the climate change dilemma. What is different about climate change? Professor Knittel will discuss how the unique characteristics of climate change create a tendency toward inaction among policy makers. He will discuss how market forces in the fossil fuel industry suggest that the market alone is unlikely to lead to deep reductions in CO2 emissions, despite the progress we’ve seen in industries such as solar and electric vehicles. Deep reductions will require policy intervention. What policies should be adopted to limit the damage from climate change? His presentation will discuss and compare policy options available at the national and state levels to reduce CO2, including a critical look at the suite of policies under California’s AB32 in terms of efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Christopher Knittel is the George P. Shultz Professor of Applied Economics in the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also the Director of MIT’s Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research which has served as the hub for social science research on energy and the environmental since the late 1970s. Professor Knittel also co-directs of The E2e Project, a research initiative between MIT, UC Berkeley, and the University of Chicago to undertake rigorous evaluation of energy efficiency investments. His research focuses on environmental economics, studying how firms and consumers respond to policies. He joined the MIT faculty in 2011. He teaches Energy Economics & Policy to undergrads, MBA students, and graduate students from outside of the Sloan School of Management. Professor Knittel received his BA in economics and political science from the California State University, Stanislaus in 1994, an MA in economics from UC Davis in 1996 and a PhD in economics from UC Berkeley in 1999.
What We KNOW About Climate Change - Kerry Emanuel
 
01:30:00
Professor Kerry Emanuel has been known for his "Show me the data!" approach to climate science. In this talk, he will present a long term, evidence-driven view of Earth's climate change, culminating in a discussion of current risks and implications. An extensive audience Q&A will follow the presentation. Professor Emanuel is an award-winning meteorologist and climate scientist and the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Atmospheric Science at MIT. His research focuses on tropical meteorology and climate, with a specialty in hurricane physics. Emanuel has a PhD from MIT, has been a faculty member since 1981 and has served as the Director of the Center for Meteorology and Physical Oceanography and the Program in Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate. He is co-founder of the MIT Lorenz Center, which fosters creative approaches to fundamental science devoted to understanding how climate works. He was named one of Time Magazine's 100 Influential People who Shape Our World in 2006. In 2007, he was elected as a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He is an author of over 100 peer-reviewed scientific papers and two books, including What We Know about Climate Change, recently hailed by the NY Times as "... the single best thing written about climate change for a general audience."
California Water 2015 - Felicia Marcus, Chair, California Water Resources Control Board
 
01:41:50
Felicia Marcus will describe California water's setting – its basic hydrology and infrastructure – then discuss the drought's impacts and the state's current actions to address them. She will also describe how California water management is changing to cope with the impacts of population growth, climate change and increasing conflicts between uses. Felicia was appointed by Governor Jerry Brown to the State Water Resources Control Board for the State of California in 2012, and designated by the Governor as Chair in April of 2013. She previously served as the Regional Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region IX during the Clinton Administration. Prior to that, Felicia headed Los Angeles' Department of Public Works at a time when the City went from garnering lawsuits to garnering national awards for environmental excellence. In the non-profit world, she was the Western Director for the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Executive VP/COO of the Trust for Public Land (TPL), and was a private and non-profit sector attorney in Los Angeles. She is also currently an Obama Administration appointee to the Commission on Environmental Cooperation-Joint Public Advisory Council (US, Mexico, Canada) and was a Schwarzenegger Administration appointee to the Delta Stewardship Council prior to being appointed to the Water Board.
Engineering Organisms to Grow Unique Materials for Energy - Professor Angela Belcher
 
01:35:55
Hear the amazing story of how Professor Belcher uses genetically-engineered viruses to biologically assemble new materials at nano-structure scale for applications as diverse as lithium ion batteries and solar photovoltaic cells! Organisms have been making exquisite inorganic materials for over 500 million years. This talk will address conditions under which organisms first evolved to make materials and her scientific approaches to move beyond naturally-evolved materials to genetically manufacture advanced materials using a "green" process. There are many properties of living systems that can be harnessed by researchers to make advanced materials; Prof. Belcher's approach is to evolve organisms to work with a diverse set of building blocks. Her goal is to have a DNA sequence that codes for assembly of any inorganic material, typically using an M13 virus as a template. Two energy-related applications she is investigating are: 1) using bio-molecular recognition, attach electrochemically active materials to conducting carbon nanotubes networks to boost electron transfer in metal phosphate cathodes for rechargeable lithium ion batteries and 2) improve the efficiency of solar cells by using biologically-assembled nanocomposites with high electron mobility to efficiently collect photo-generated electrons. She will also demonstrate how these novel processes can be used in life science applications, such as ovarian cancer detection. ------------- Professor Belcher is a Materials Chemist with expertise in the fields of biomolecular materials, organic-inorganic interfaces and solid state chemistry. Her primary research focus is evolving new materials for energy, electronics and the environment. She received her B.S. in Creative Studies with an emphasis in biology from The University of California, Santa Barbara. She continued her education at UCSB and earned a Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry (1997). Following a year of postdoctoral research in electrical engineering at UCSB, Dr. Belcher joined the faculty at The University of Texas at Austin in the Department of Chemistry in 1999. She joined the faculty at MIT in 2002 and now holds the W.M. Keck Chair in Energy. In 2002, she founded the company Cambrios Technologies, Inc., and in 2007 she founded Siluria Technologies, Inc. In 2012, Dr. Belcher was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. She also received the Boston Museum of Science "Walker Prize" for lifetime achievement in science. In 2010 Dr. Belcher received the Eni Prize for Renewable and Non-conventional Energy. In 2009, Rolling Stone Magazine listed her as one of the top 100 people changing the country. In 2007, Time Magazine named her a "Hero"- for her research related to Climate Change. In 2006, she was named Research Leader of the Year by Scientific American and was awarded a 2006 Popular Mechanics Breakthrough award. In 2005, she was named as one of 10 to watch by Fortune magazine for "how the world will work in the next 75 years." Her work has been published in many prestigious scientific journals including Science and Nature, and has been reported in the popular press including Time, Fortune, Forbes, Discover, Scientific American, Rolling Stone, The New York Times, Washington Post, Business Week and The Wall Street Journal.
Securing More Sustainable Solutions to Urban Water Challenges - Prof. Richard Luthy
 
01:08:25
Dick Luthy is the Silas H. Palmer Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University and a Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment. His expertise is environmental engineering and water quality. He's Director of the NSF's Engineering Research Center for re- inventing the nation's urban water infrastructure (renuwit.org), a multi-university collaboration to develop, promote and achieve new, more sustainable solutions to urban water challenges. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Many cities, especially in the west, face increasing water scarcity and a mounting water crisis arising from climate change, population growth, ecosystem demands and deteriorating infrastructure. Dr Luthy will describe collaborative research efforts to address this crisis through more sustainable solutions to urban water use, reuse and management. Examples of engineered systems that employ distributed treatment systems, embrace energy-neutral wastewater reclamation and nutrient recovery, and manage natural resources will be described. These systems enhance our ability to transmit, store, and purify water while simultaneously restoring urban hydrology and aquatic habitat. While institutional issues confront water innovation, university-industry collaborations have the potential to identify and overcome these barriers.
Energy Access in Developing Countries
 
01:17:54
Please join us for a lively panel discussion with energy access leaders and policy makers as they describe the challenges and opportunities for providing clean and sustainable energy to more than a billion people in developing countries. Joshua Pierce – Co-founder & CTO, Off-Grid Electric Sandhya Hegde – General Partner, Khosla Impact Fund Brian Warshawsky – COO, Fenix International Lesley Marincola - Angaza Moderator: Lisa Ann Pinkerton – Technica Communications According to IFC, 1.6 billion on the planet have limited or no access to electricity. They spend almost $37 billion annually on traditional energy sources, primarily kerosene. This is almost 10% of a household’s monthly cash outlays. In addition, indoor air pollution from traditional lighting and cooking fuel results in 800,000 premature deaths and 300 million metric tons of CO2 emissions. Several innovative technology solutions - e.g. solar and rechargeable lanterns, solar kits, solar and battery nano- and micro-grids are increasingly being adopted as a preferred alternative. In addition to lighting, these solutions are also enabling mobile phone charging and appliances like fans, TVs and water pumps, transforming their lives. Not only they provide a more sustainable alternative, but the opportunity is estimated to be $31 billion. In 2015 alone, this sector attracted $112 million in venture funding.
The Oceans in a Warming World - John Marshall
 
58:21
How are the oceans changing and what role do they play in climate change? John Marshall is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Oceanography in the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS) at MIT. He conducts research in climate science and the general circulation of the atmosphere and oceans, which he studies through the development of mathematical and numerical models of key physical and bio-geochemical processes. John became interested in meteorology and oceanography as a physics undergraduate student at Imperial College, London. Since moving to MIT over 20 years ago, he has studied physical oceanography and, increasingly, the role of the ocean in climate. According to John, “I was attracted to the field of oceanography because of its wonderful mix of empiricism, observation, theory and modeling. Furthermore, its ‘bottom-up’ nature allows scientists themselves to identify the problems to be solved, then organize and implement programs to do so. It still remains a field in which scientists working in small groups can make a huge impact.” He is motivated by the fact that understanding the climate, and the role of the ocean therein, represents one of the greatest and important intellectual challenges facing mankind today. Professor Marshall is the Director of MIT’s Climate Modeling Initiative and also the coordinator of Oceans @ MIT, a new umbrella organization dedicated to all things related to the ocean across the Institute.
Pioneers of Clean Technology - Ahmad Chatila - The Making of SunEdison
 
01:26:31
How do you transform a silicon wafer supplier to the semiconductor industry into a global renewable energy company in six short years and where do you go from there? Join us for an evening of engaging dialogue as Ahmad Chatila tells the fascinating story of the transformation from MEMC to today’s SunEdison, with the challenges and opportunities he faced along the way and how he navigated through them, followed by his assessment of today’s global energy industry and how new technologies and business models are emerging from bold and innovative new energy companies. Ahmad Chatila serves as SunEdison’s President and Chief Executive Officer and a member of the Board of Directors. He also serves as Chairman of Terraform Power. Prior to SunEdison, Ahmad served as Executive Vice President of the Memory and Imaging Division, and head of global manufacturing for Cypress Semiconductor. In these roles, he was responsible for strategy, financial performance and revenue growth for the Memory and Imaging Division, as well as global manufacturing for all divisions of Cypress. Previously Ahmad served as managing director of Cypress' Low Power Memory Business Unit. Prior to these roles at Cypress, Ahmad served in sales at Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC). Ahmad holds a bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Arizona State University, a masters degree in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University, and has completed the Stanford Executive Program at Stanford University.
The MIT Logarhythms
 
44:55
In the spring of 1949 a group of MIT students came together to form the Logarhythms. Building upon the influence of barbershop tunes they swiftly began singing all over campus, building a fan base throughout Cambridge. Over the next few decades the 'Logs' introduced gospel, doo-wop, and modern hits, performing at several MIT events including Commencement. While balancing their academic workload, athletics, and keeping fans at bay, the Logs managed to record several albums, which last to this day. In the late 1990's the Logs made the transition from barbershop to modern a cappella introducing vocal percussion and complex arrangements of modern songs. The Logs performed off campus more often and toured around the country to California, Texas, Ohio, New York, Florida, and all of New England. Last year the Logs celebrated their 60th anniversary as one of the country's finest a cappella groups. Their tremendous success is attributed to its alumni who have shaped this group into what it is today.
The Future of Early Cancer Detection - Jorge Soto - Miroculus
 
51:36
Early detection of cancer has been problematic due to the fact that there are so many different variations of cancer and that current diagnostic approaches are invasive and expensive. Jorge and his team have developed a bold new test for cancer diagnosis – one that functions by searching for patterns in microRNA in the bloodstream. This affordable, open source device debuted publicly at the TEDGlobal conference in 2014. Speaker Biography Jorge, a graduate of both Tec de Monterrey and Singularity University, is co-founder and CTO of Miroculus, a life science company that aims to push forward a new test for different diseases based on circulating microRNAs. Prior to founding Miroculus, he co-founded CitiVox and later joined the office of the presidency of Mexico as the deputy general director of civic innovation. Jorge is an Endeavor Global entrepreneur, an Ashoka Fellow, an MIT Technology Review Innovator under 35 and a World Economic Forum Technology Pioneer and Global Shaper.
Plant-based Meat Has Arrived! - Part 3 - Impossible Questions
 
53:35
This is disruptive technology. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FjW2vNVZIhE Dr. Patrick Brown: ”Impossible Foods began in 2011 with an ambitious goal: To drastically reduce humanity’s destructive impact on the global environment by completely replacing the use of animals as a food production technology. We intend to accomplish this mission within two decades by creating the world’s most delicious, nutritious, affordable and sustainable meat, fish and dairy foods directly from plants.” We will be serving Impossible Burgers for dinner, so come try them for yourself. They feel and taste like the real thing - in fact, these burgers even bleed when cooked! A quarter pound Impossible Burger with 20 grams of protein from wheat, coconut oil and potatoes uses 95% less land, 74% less water, and creates 87% less greenhouse gas emissions than a burger produced from a cow. In fact, animal agriculture uses 30% of all land, over 25% of all freshwater on Earth, and creates as much greenhouse gas emissions as all of the world’s cars, trucks, trains, ships, and airplanes combined. Is this the key to feeding a world that will need 70% more food by 2050? The global plant based protein (PBP) market is expected to reach $11 billion by 2022. No longer a fringe market, even large meat producers like Tysons Foods, Nestle and Cargill have invested in clean or plant based meat companies. In fact, Tyson CEO Tom Hayes, believes that 20 percent of “meat” will come from clean or plant based meats in 25 years. Dr. Brown will discuss his journey from medical student to coinventor of DNA microarrays to Stanford biochemistry professor to founder of Impossible Foods. He will discuss how heme (as in hemoglobin) from genetically modified yeast is the key to the meat-like taste. Impossible also uses a gas chromatography mass spectrometer system to analyze and then reproduce the other flavors in meat from plant based sources. With all the other veggie burgers out there, why did Dr. Brown decide that he needed to make one that tastes and feels like meat? What are the regulatory and marketing battles he’s faced? What’s next after the Impossible Burger? Pat Brown was trained as a pediatrician at the University of Chicago, where he received his BS, MD and PhD. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2002 and is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Before founding Impossible Foods, he was Professor of Biochemistry at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the American Cancer Society Medal of Honor and the NAS Award in Molecular Biology. Pat Brown is also a co-founder of the Public Library of Science (PLOS), a nonprofit publisher of open-access scientific and medical research.
How the Atmosphere Affects Climate Change - Professor Dan Cziczo - MIT
 
01:23:20
What are the roles of greenhouse gases, small particles and clouds? It has been known for over a century that greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane warm the planet by trapping heat. What is not as well known is that particles can cool the planet by reflecting sunlight into space and by acting as the seeds on which clouds form. Particles and clouds are also of contemporary interest because it has been suggested they might affect climate by interacting with cosmic rays or be used to manipulate the Earth's temperature. Join us and hear from an expert how these climate forcings impact climate change! Dan Cziczo is an atmospheric scientist interested in the interrelationship of particulate matter and cloud formation. His research utilizes laboratory and field studies to elucidate how small particles interact with water vapor to form droplets and ice crystals which are important players in the Earth's climate system. Experiments include using small cloud chambers in the laboratory to mimic atmospheric conditions that lead to cloud formation and observing clouds in situ from remote mountaintop sites or through the use of research aircraft. Dan holds a bachelor's degree from the University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) and Masters and PhD degrees from the University of Chicago.
Smart Grid - Opportunities for Innovation
 
01:49:22
Neil Armstrong once said that our electric grid was one of the greatest engineering achievements of the 20th century. Yet, in the next few decades, our electric grid will need to be modernized to meet the evolving energy challenges of the 21st century. These include increasing renewable energy generation and dealing with the proliferation of distributed energy resources such as rooftop solar panels, electric vehicles, energy storage, and smart appliances, while keeping electric energy supply inexpensive and reliable. But with challenges come opportunities for innovation. New technologies such as grid data networking, smart meters, analytics and demand response algorithms will help modernize our electric grid and benefit consumers and utilities alike through enhanced energy efficiency, improved reliability, the ability to integrate new sources of energy generation, including at the local level. What new technologies, solutions, and business model innovations are required to allow a Smart Grid to be able to realize its potential to deliver these benefits, including adapting to emerging distributed energy resources? Smart Meters, aka advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), have been deployed throughout the state, but Time-of-Use (TOU) rates or dynamic pricing have not yet been implemented. Will they be mandated so consumers can start managing their energy bills better? With the smart grid, more energy devices will be networked and a lot of Big Data will flow. What innovations are needed to be able to analyze the data and optimize supply and demand in order to deliver benefits to energy providers and consumers? Please join us to learn about the numerous Smart Grid innovation opportunities from top executives of leading smart grid companies in the Bay Area! Andy White -- CEO, Trilliant Brian Thompson - CEO, Stem Lisa Caswell -- President, eMeter Steve Malnight -- VP, Pacific Gas & Electric Moderator: Don Keller -- Board of Directors, Orrick
TIM Talk: The Future of AI - MITCNC Tech Conference 2017
 
25:41
Speaker: Hemant Taneja, Managing Director, General Catalyst. Hemant discusses topics related to "Responsible Innovation". Shuja Keen starts with an introduction to the MIT Club of Northern California's Tech Conference for 2017. The conference is all about AI in research, application, investment and the enterprise. The keynote talk starts at 7:40.
Ghost in the Machine - AI and Autonomous Autos - Part 1 - MITCNC Tech Conference 2017
 
21:59
IRFAN ESSA, Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology ALI JAMEEL, Founder & CEO, TPL Holdings JOEL PAZHAYAMPALLIL, Co-Founder, Drive.ai LIOR RON, Co-Founder, Otto MODERATOR: SARAH MIRZA Partner, Artegis Law Group
China's Energy Future: How Clean, How Fast? - Professor Valerie Karplus, MIT
 
01:46:58
China’s energy system is changing rapidly on many fronts. Slower economic growth is calling into question the need for sustained expansion of the energy supply. At the same time, the structure of the economy is shifting away from energy-intensive, export-led growth in favor of domestic consumption. Severe local air pollution and its public health consequences are creating pressure to reduce reliance on coal, especially in the populous eastern coastal provinces. China has also pledged to mitigate global climate change by reaching peak CO2 emissions by 2030, by reducing CO2 intensity by 60-65% by 2030, relative to 2005, and raising the contribution of non-fossil energy to 20% of the nation’s primary energy mix by the same year. What do these developments mean for China’s energy system over the next 15 years? Prof. Karplus will discuss what it will take to reach peak CO2 emissions in China by 2030—and why there is a good chance that this peak will arrive early. The presentation will begin with an overview of China’s energy system and the policies and institutions that will influence the nature and pace of a clean energy transition. She will then discuss analysis by the MIT-Tsinghua China Energy and Climate Project on what China’s climate pledge, economic growth and structure transition, and ongoing energy system reforms will mean for the pace and difficulty of achieving a transition to cleaner forms of energy. She will also elaborate on what climate policies focused on CO2 will mean for air pollution and efforts to meet near-term air quality improvement goals. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of why a clean energy transition will not be quick or easy. Using examples from China’s experience in recent years, she will discuss the on-the-ground implementation challenges that advocates of transition face, including monitoring, reporting, and verification of CO2 emissions data, conflicting incentives, and the need for greater policy coordination. A discussion of the main uncertainties involved will complete this tour de force of China’s energy future. Valerie Karplus is an Assistant Professor of Global Economics and Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management. She studies resource and environmental management in firms operating in diverse national and industry contexts, with a focus on the role of institutions and management practices in explaining performance. She is an expert on China’s energy system, including technology and business model innovation, energy system governance, and the management of air pollution and climate change. From 2011 to 2015, she directed the MIT-Tsinghua China Energy and Climate Project, a five-year research effort focused on analyzing the design of energy and climate change policy in China, and its domestic and global impacts. Through continuing collaboration with Tsinghua University, she studies the technological and organizational challenges of managing energy and its environmental impacts in China. She is a faculty affiliate of the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change and the MIT Energy Initiative. She teaches Entrepreneurship without Borders, New Models for Global Business, and is currently developing a new course on Global Energy Markets and Policy. She holds a BS in biochemistry and political science from Yale University and a PhD in engineering systems from MIT.
MIT.nano: A Nanoscale Innovation Factory - MIT Dean Vladimir Bulović
 
01:29:49
The Nano Age is upon us. By constructing a $350M center for nanoscience and nanotechnology at the heart of MIT campus, the Institute aims to harness the power of nanotechnology to humanity’s greatest challenges in Health and Life Sciences, Energy, Computing, Information Technology and Manufacturing. Where can nano make a difference? Bulović will tell you: “Everywhere !” And then through examples of MIT technologies he will show you how nanoscale advancements will reimagine nearly every technical discipline in the world, because nano is not a specific technology. It does not belong to a particular industry. It is, rather, a revolutionary way of understanding and working with matter. Within MIT.nano, using cutting-edge new equipment and processes, over 2,000 MIT researchers will explore new science, invent new technologies and become the next generation of technology leaders. Advancements within MIT.nano will underpin and enable a wide range of technical and social endeavors, propelling the abilities of our nation and the world in the 21st century.
The Future of U.S. Solar Photovoltaic Technology - Q&A - Tonio Buonassisi
 
25:28
The solar photovoltaic (PV) industry continues to grow, despite intense international competition and recent margin compression. Can innovation in technology and manufacturing allow American companies to compete and ultimately thrive in this huge but challenging market? Professor Buonassisi will address these questions as he explores the outlook for American PV cell and module suppliers. He will begin by using an industry-validated bottoms-up cost model to compare the cost-reduction potentials of various innovative PV technologies, and how their successful development could influence manufacturing location decisions. He will also describe recent progress toward these innovative technologies, highlighting the new computational and experimental tools that have accelerated the cycle of discovery and product development — providing "sneak peeks" at the technologies that may grace rooftops in years to come. He will conclude by showcasing recent success stories of U.S. innovation. Join us as Professor Buonassisi explains how technology innovation will open up pathways for success in the U.S. solar PV industry. Tonio Buonassisi, MIT Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, heads an interdisciplinary research laboratory focused on photovoltaics (PV). He completed his Ph.D. in Applied Science & Technology at UC Berkeley, with additional research at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems and the Max-Planck-Institute for Microstructure Physics. He is author of over a hundred journal papers, and co-developer of a dedicated course on photovoltaics. Prof. Buonassisi invents, develops, and applies defect-engineering techniques over the entire solar cell process, from crystal growth to modules, improving the cost effectiveness of commercial and next-generation solar cells. Several of his PV innovations have been implemented in industry, including key contributions leading to the founding of solar start-ups and a research institute.
Acquiring Intelligence - The AI Corporate VC and M&A landscape - MITCNC Tech Conference 2017
 
24:08
JAMES CHAM, Partner, Bloomberg Beta JOHN RODKIN, Managing Director, Samsung NEXT Start MATT GARRATT, VP Corporate Development, Salesforce Ventures PEGAH EBRAHIMI, COO Global Technology Banking, Morgan Stanley Investment Banking Division JOEL PAZHAYAMPALLIL, Co-Founder, Drive.ai MODERATOR: ALEX ROSEN, Managing Director, IDG Ventures MENS ET MANUS + MACHINES -- The Future of AI AI trailblazers, machine learning experts, forward thinking executives, data scientists, and product and engineering innovators will gather at the MITCNC Applied AI Conference to share how to build real-world AI solutions as well as impact of AI in our society and life.
Towards 1 Gpbs Broadband Access - Dr. Cedric Lam - Google
 
41:07
On March 30, 2011, Google announced Kansas City, Kansas, would be the first community where 1,000 Mbps broadband network access would be deployed. Google's fiber-to-the premises services in the United States aims to provide broadband internet and television speed 100 times faster than today's basic broadband, giving consumers instant connection to video chat, online games, and other entertainment and information destination. The last mile has always been the biggest bottle neck in internet connectivity. Various technologies and companies have emerged to solve this problem. Come listen to Dr. Lam explain how Google is tackling this problem one city at a time. Dr. Cedric F. Lam (林 峯) is currently Tech Lead / Manager at Google. He manages the Platforms Group of Google Fiber to develop scalable and cost-effective next generation FTTH technologies to fulfill Google's mission of deploying 1 Gb/s access to broadband customer. Before joining Google, Dr. Lam was Chief System Architect at Opvista which made ultra-high density WDM transport systems. Prior to Opvista, Dr. Lam was Senior Technical Staff Member at AT&T Labs, Broadband Access Research Department. Dr. Lam has a PhD from UCLA and B. Eng. (First Class Honors) from University of Hong Kong, both in Electrical Engineering. His current interests include broadband access network architectures, technologies, and datacenter networking.
TIM Talk: AI in SAAS - MITCNC Tech Conference 2017
 
17:48
Speaker: TEVEN TAMM, CTO, Salesforce MENS ET MANUS + MACHINES -- The Future of AI AI trailblazers, machine learning experts, forward thinking executives, data scientists, and product and engineering innovators will gather at the MITCNC Applied AI Conference to share how to build real-world AI solutions as well as impact of AI in our society and life.
AI Frontiers - MITCNC Tech Conference 2017 on The Future of AI
 
32:27
Panel: AI Frontiers - Straight from the Labs ED BOYDEN, Professor, MIT VIJAY PANDE, General Partner, Andreesen Horowitz SURYA GANGULI, Assistant Professor, Stanford University EDUARDO TORRES-JARA, CEO, Robot Rebuilt MANOLIS KELLIS, Professor, MIT MODERATOR: AMAR KENDALE, SVP Product, Livongo Health MENS ET MANUS + MACHINES -- The Future of AI AI trailblazers, machine learning experts, forward thinking executives, data scientists, and product and engineering innovators will gather at the MITCNC Applied AI Conference to share how to build real-world AI solutions as well as impact of AI in our society and life.
Biofuels
 
01:50:27
Biofuels: How Biotech is Changing the Energy Industry Featuring the top executives of the Bay Area's leading Biofuels companies! John Melo - CEO, Amyris Jonathan Wolfson - CEO, Solazyme Bob Mayer - CEO, Cobalt Technologies Noubar Afeyan - Chairman, LS9 Moderator: Don Keller - Partner, Orrick SV Despite widespread interest in electric cars, the EIA projects that liquid fuels will provide more than 90% of US transportation energy through 2035. There is an urgent need to find renewable sources, to provide a reliable supply for US consumers and to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions created by fossil fuels. Biofuels look well-positioned for this role, but face daunting challenges in raising capital for facilities and competing with volatile commodity prices. Biotechnology offers firms the promise of meeting these crucial challenges by improving the yields of feedstocks, reducing processing costs and producing high-value outputs. But will this be enough? * How effectively will biofuels compete with other transportation fuels, such as ethanol or natural gas? * What are the major challenges biofuels firms face as they attempt to scale up to compete with petroleum and what are their strategies to deal with them? * What federal policies are most important to the industrybfuture? Hear first-hand how these executives will tackle these and other key challenges to build their companies for success!
The Prosetta Platform Applied to Human Disease - Dr. Vishwanath Lingappa
 
01:26:28
Overcoming old paradigms in science can often take decades. Learn how Dr Vishawanath Lingappa fast tracked his "against-the-herd" discovery of self-assembly of viruses and the creation of a new subfield of molecular biology. He will bring his lively role as an internationally known speaker and scientist to the MITCNC Life Science forum. Dr Lingappa will focus his talk on three broad areas: 1) The pursuit of scientific knowledge and the trials and tribulations of developing truly new paradigms. 2) The journey from academic physician and Professor at UCSF to Founder and CEO of a for-profit biotech company, Prosetta. 3) Prosetta's current translational research: clinical applications from basic scientific discoveries to clinical development of truly novel therapies. Vishwanath R. Lingappa is currently CTO and Co-CEO of Prosetta Antiviral, Inc, in San Francisco. In these roles he is responsible for the advancement of Prosetta's scientific programs in both anti-viral drug development and protein bioconformatics. He received a B.A. from Swarthmore College in 1975, a Ph.D. from The Rockefeller University in 1979, and an M.D. from Cornell University Medical College in 1980. Dr. Lingappa joined the faculty of UCSF in 1982, where he ran an NIH-funded basic research laboratory for over 20 years and he has practiced internal medicine at SF General Hospital for over 26 years. Dr. Lingappa has co-authored over 90 publications. He maintains voluntary positions as Senior Scientist at the Research Institute of California Pacific Medical Center and Emeritus Professor of Physiology at UCSF. He is recipient of a Kaiser Award for excellence in teaching (1990) and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2004).
Clean Tech Investing: Novel Ways To Fund Your Cleantech Company
 
01:52:25
Many traditional early stage investors have de-emphasized clean tech or pulled out altogether, so where can you go to fund your new company? Traditional venture investors are still participating in this sector, although they tend to be smaller and more focused. And there are many others. Have you considered angels, private equity, corporate venture funds, federal or state grants, international venture investors, prizes or family offices? Come hear about these less well-known new funding sources and get advice from the experts. Amit Kumar, Band of Angels Dag Syrrist, Global BSN Felix Zhang, Envision Energy Danny Kennedy, CalCEF Kristian Hannelt, Ultra Capital Stephan Dolezalek, Vantage Point Capital Partners Moderator: Eric Wesoff, Editor in Chief, Greentech Media
Unsupervised Earlystage Investing - MITCNC Tech Conference 2017
 
24:33
ELAD GIL, Chairman and Founder, Color Genomics LEONARD SPEISER, Founder, Neuron.vc VANESSA LARCO, Partner, NEA AJAY SUDAN, Partner, Lightspeed Venture Partners AILEEN LEE Founding Partner, Cowboy Ventures MODERATOR: SARAH GUO, Principal, Greylock Partners MENS ET MANUS + MACHINES -- The Future of AI AI trailblazers, machine learning experts, forward thinking executives, data scientists, and product and engineering innovators will gather at the MITCNC Applied AI Conference to share how to build real-world AI solutions as well as impact of AI in our society and life.

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